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Re: Dry Bilges

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  • yonderman@gmail.com
    I ve never regretted having a drain plug in the bottom of my larger boats. This is particularly useful when you are trailering during a heavy rainstorm. On a
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 1, 2011
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      I've never regretted having a drain plug in the bottom of my larger boats. This is particularly useful when you are trailering during a heavy rainstorm. On a large open boat, it's easy to wind up with a lot of very heavy water collecting in the bilges when you are trailering. I'd rather have a boat that drained to the highway than one that I had to get out an bail periodically. It's a safety thing above all else.

      Of course you have to remember to put the plug back in before you launch! I've forgotten this crucial step a time or two, I have to admit. That's when you go back and get the trailer and haul it back out to let the water drain out. Any worry about leaking through the drain plug is way overstated in my opinion. It's just not that big a deal to have an opening below the waterline.

      My current boat has an Elvstrom bailer mounted in the low point of the hulll. The advantage here is if you are going fast enough you can open it and bail the bilges without any effort by you.

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bill Howard <billh39@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am building a 1/8 scale model of Jim Michalak's Picara design. This has been an educational build. What I learned would convince me to never start a full size boat without building a model first.
      >
      > Questions for all you experienced builders and sailors:
      >
      > How does one get water out of the bilges? I just turn my June Bug upside down to put it on top of my CRV, and any drops fall out.
      >
      > But what to do about casual water in the bilges of a 1300 lb boat?
      >
      > My fiberglass Daysailer had a bilge plug in the transom for this purpose; when on the trailer this was the low point, and water fell out.
      >
      > What is the secret for larger wood boats?
      >
      > Thanks for your help.
      >
      > Bill Howard
      > Nellysford VA
      >
    • Ron Magen
      Bill & yonder - Depending on the type of Drain , or more specifically Drain Plug , hang a reminder on the hatch latch or some other VERY CONSPICUOUS
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 2, 2011
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        Bill & 'yonder' -
        Depending on the type of 'Drain', or more specifically 'Drain Plug', hang a
        'reminder' on the hatch latch or some other VERY CONSPICUOUS place.
        Something that MUST be unlocked or used BEFORE you even get the boat off the
        trailer.

        On the P15 I am refurbishing, I put in a scupper of brass tube and used a
        'screw/snap-latch' compressing plug. It is a separate piece. If this was
        used as a Bilge Drain I would attach a loop of Stainless 'safety wire' to it
        and place it on the hasp of the hatch lock. It would be not only
        'conspicuous, but the first thing I would touch before even entering the
        boat!! It would ANNOUNCE that THIS was the FIRST thing to be done.

        Even if you don't use this type of 'stopper' - use something ELSE as a
        'mnemonic. I believe the P15 originally came with a simple cork - attach a
        BIG one or even a large wooden plug shaped like one. Or an old latch-type
        Thermos stopper, etc.

        Regards & Good Luck,
        Ron Magen
        Backyard Boatshop


        > 2a. Re: Dry Bilges
        > Posted by: "yonderman@..." yonderman@... jmbell1
        <snip>
        > I've never regretted having a drain plug in the bottom of my larger boats.
        > This is particularly useful when you are trailering during a heavy
        > rainstorm.
        <snip>
        > Of course you have to remember to put the plug back in before you launch!
        > I've forgotten this crucial step a time or two, I have to admit.
        <snip>
        Bill Howard <billh39@...> wrote:
        >> Questions for all you experienced builders and sailors:
        >>
        >> How does one get water out of the bilges? . . . But what to do about
        >> casual water in the bilges of a 1300 lb boat?
        >>
      • John and Kathy Trussell
        I once was a passenger on a big deep v. The owner s wife backed us into the water and agreed to meet us at the end of the day. We motored 6 miles offshore to
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 2, 2011
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          I once was a passenger on a big deep v. The owner’s wife backed us into the water and agreed to meet us at the end of the day. We motored 6 miles offshore to an artificial reef, anchored, and began rigging the rods when we noticed a lot of water over our feet. We had a plug but we had not put in. Exciting times! Happily, the motor started, we tied a float cushion to the anchor line and dumped it, and were able to get up on a plane and suck the water out. Since then, I have painted ‘PLUG!’ on my trailer tongue as a reminder to install the plug before I launch. So far, it has worked.

           

          JohnT

           


          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto: bolger@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ron Magen
          Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 4:00 PM
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [bolger] Re: Dry Bilges

           

           

          Bill & 'yonder' -
          Depending on the type of 'Drain', or more specifically 'Drain Plug', hang a
          'reminder' on the hatch latch or some other VERY CONSPICUOUS place.
          Something that MUST be unlocked or used BEFORE you even get the boat off the
          trailer.

          On the P15 I am refurbishing, I put in a scupper of brass tube and used a
          'screw/snap-latch' compressing plug. It is a separate piece. If this was
          used as a Bilge Drain I would attach a loop of Stainless 'safety wire' to it
          and place it on the hasp of the hatch lock. It would be not only
          'conspicuous, but the first thing I would touch before even entering the
          boat!! It would ANNOUNCE that THIS was the FIRST thing to be done.

          Even if you don't use this type of 'stopper' - use something ELSE as a
          'mnemonic. I believe the P15 originally came with a simple cork - attach a
          BIG one or even a large wooden plug shaped like one. Or an old latch-type
          Thermos stopper, etc.

          Regards & Good Luck,
          Ron Magen
          Backyard Boatshop

          > 2a. Re: Dry Bilges
          > Posted by: "yonderman@..."
          yonderman@... jmbell1
          <snip>
          > I've never regretted having a drain plug in the bottom of my larger boats.
          > This is particularly useful when you are trailering during a heavy
          > rainstorm.
          <snip>
          > Of course you have to remember to put the plug back in before you launch!
          > I've forgotten this crucial step a time or two, I have to admit.
          <snip>
          Bill Howard <billh39@...> wrote:
          >> Questions for all you experienced builders and sailors:
          >>
          >> How does one get water out of the bilges? . . . But what to do about
          >> casual water in the bilges of a 1300 lb boat?
          >>

        • Douglas Pollard
          I am now sailing a Vega 27 and am happy to have a drain plug in the bilge. My ice box drains into the builge so when I haul I dump some detergent in the bilge
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 2, 2011
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            I am now sailing a Vega 27 and am happy to have a drain plug in the bilge.  My ice box drains into the builge so when I haul I dump some detergent in the bilge and scrub around in there and wash the whole thing out with a garden hose. The boat stays pretty sweet and it might not if it weren't easy to scrub her out.  If any food crumbs get in there a good rinsing out is also a good rot preventer on a wooden boat          Doug



            On 04/02/2011 04:23 PM, John and Kathy Trussell wrote:  

            I once was a passenger on a big deep v. The owner’s wife backed us into the water and agreed to meet us at the end of the day. We motored 6 miles offshore to an artificial reef, anchored, and began rigging the rods when we noticed a lot of water over our feet. We had a plug but we had not put in. Exciting times! Happily, the motor started, we tied a float cushion to the anchor line and dumped it, and were able to get up on a plane and suck the water out. Since then, I have painted ‘PLUG!’ on my trailer tongue as a reminder to install the plug before I launch. So far, it has worked.

             

            JohnT

             


            From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ron Magen
            Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 4:00 PM
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [bolger] Re: Dry Bilges

             

             

            Bill & 'yonder' -
            Depending on the type of 'Drain', or more specifically 'Drain Plug', hang a
            'reminder' on the hatch latch or some other VERY CONSPICUOUS place.
            Something that MUST be unlocked or used BEFORE you even get the boat off the
            trailer.

            On the P15 I am refurbishing, I put in a scupper of brass tube and used a
            'screw/snap-latch' compressing plug. It is a separate piece. If this was
            used as a Bilge Drain I would attach a loop of Stainless 'safety wire' to it
            and place it on the hasp of the hatch lock. It would be not only
            'conspicuous, but the first thing I would touch before even entering the
            boat!! It would ANNOUNCE that THIS was the FIRST thing to be done.

            Even if you don't use this type of 'stopper' - use something ELSE as a
            'mnemonic. I believe the P15 originally came with a simple cork - attach a
            BIG one or even a large wooden plug shaped like one. Or an old latch-type
            Thermos stopper, etc.

            Regards & Good Luck,
            Ron Magen
            Backyard Boatshop

            > 2a. Re: Dry Bilges
            > Posted by: "yonderman@..." yonderman@... jmbell1
            <snip>
            > I've never regretted having a drain plug in the bottom of my larger boats.
            > This is particularly useful when you are trailering during a heavy
            > rainstorm.
            <snip>
            > Of course you have to remember to put the plug back in before you launch!
            > I've forgotten this crucial step a time or two, I have to admit.
            <snip>
            Bill Howard <billh39@...> wrote:
            >> Questions for all you experienced builders and sailors:
            >>
            >> How does one get water out of the bilges? . . . But what to do about
            >> casual water in the bilges of a 1300 lb boat?
            >>


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