Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: To OLDSHOEers

Expand Messages
  • Stefano
    Well, thank you David, that s a lot of an inside view on OS s capabilities. I think everybody here knows (or better know!) that there isn t such thing as an
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 14, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Well, thank you David, that's a lot of an inside view on OS's capabilities. I think everybody here knows (or better know!) that there isn't such thing as an uncapsizeble boat, given right wheather and handling. Reading how that happened confirms my opinion of a safe boat overall. Reefing ahead is always a must, I agree with you. I figured that turning OS upside up might have been quite a challenge if singlehanded, good to hear that two can do it without unsteping masts. The amount of water that got in when turned back upside up is reassuring. I did think that locking front hatch very tight was desirable. Speaking of sides compartments if I ever decide to poke holes in them, than they will be shut with a watertight screw-on cap (like those you see in dinghies for aeration of buoyancy chambers). I think I will not cut out the hole in the bow transom, if I really need a step, then I'll screw a metal handle through central fastening frame (doubled) instead . As for hawsehole use, I can stretch one bow transom vertical fastening frame and having it become a bitt. Very minimal changes, methink. I agree with all your conclusions, and would add only one more: lifejackets on, everyone, every time, every wheather.
      I really appreciated your contribution.
      Thank you
      Ste


      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dir_cobb" <dir_cobb@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ste
      >
      > I can comment that in my case I do use the side compartments for storage and that they do actually work perfectly. I keep a short paddle down each side and small items like spare ropes and the motor toolkit.
      >
      > I find these compartments provide safe storage for items low down where they don't move about. The easy way to recover things is to stuff them in bags/sacks which can be tied to the bulkhead.
      >
      > I keep the main hatch as empty as possible when actually sailing and use it for storing the sails and PFD's when not out sailing.
      >
      > Re use of the compartments/access hatches I have a confession to make: I managed to capsize my Oldshoe.
      >
      > I was sailing with a elderly but seasoned sailor in pretty nasty conditions. It was blowing well and we were bucketing along nicely in our dry cockpit (no reefs). As we rounded a headland we came into a strange formation of short deep chop. A gust caught us from straight astern and the boat buried her bow in the water. Water came gushing through the front step and then over the bow transom as she tried to become a submarine. As the bow went down and water gushed over the hatch, the boat started to pitchpole but the mizzen brought the stern round just in time and we rolled sedately onto our side to then go completely over. She settled down nicely turtled and sat very stable with the whole bottom exposed to the day.
      >
      > Having checked that we were both OK, we came to the task of righting Oldshoe. In these conditions, she was very comfortably settled upside down, with both masts and sails vertically downwards and not much interest in rolling back. We got her on her side once and she rolled happily back again. On the second or third roll with our combined weight of 180 kg hanging from the keel and later the sides (there is a lot to hang on to but little purchase because of the small keel) she righted perfectly and rounded up into the wind. We did not unstep the masts or drop the sails in this process, but she certainly showed no intention of self righting.
      >
      > Getting in through the motor cutout was a breeze (while she shed the water) and she actually self bailed about half the contents of the footwell.
      >
      > The forward hatch stayed put for the whole operation but let a certain amount of water in (presumably as water gushed into and over it while the bow transom was submerging).
      >
      > I lost all the loose contents of the cockpit and wells including floorboard (recovered finally by a friendly motor boat but I suggest to paint it a bright colour unless somehow tied or secured in place), bailer, spare bits and bobs, water bottle, etc. (fortunately no camera on board this time).
      >
      > The 3.5 HP 2 stroke Tohatsu started third pull after the ordeal and made everything much easier (despite the chop).
      >
      >
      > My conclusions:
      >
      > 1) Do not cut side access holes in the flotation compartments. We would not have self rescued and sailed/motored home if the compartments had filled with water. The 10 or so gallons that did get in were bad enough.
      >
      > 2) Make sure your hatch catches are firm. I was dreading the forward fixing would fail as the water poured over/against Bulkhead A. I never envisaged the pitchpole effect, but once she starts to go down by the bow, there is no way to stop her.
      >
      > 3) Keep a spare bailer inside the hatch.
      >
      > 4) Put a reef in the sail long before you think it might be a good idea.
      >
      >
      > I love the design, she goes beautifully in a whole range of conditions and draws all types of comments. The latest (from a boatload of youngsters was "f*** what a weird ***". She does not like motorboat wakes (or big waves) head on (the bow transom slams horribly and stops her).
      >
      > I was pleasently surprised that there was no damage at all and that she continued business as usual after the ordeal. I continue to sail her happily and allow my 11 year old son to sail her when he feels like it. He is much more cautious than I am with my boat.
      >
      > Trust of use
      >
      >
      > David
      >
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Stefano" <gordas@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Thank you Dennis,
      > > That answered my question. Forward compartment being large enough, I'll use sides to get extra buoyancy and take kids out in even more safety (if possible).
      > >
      > > Ste
      > > Italy
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dennislancaster36" <dennislancaster36@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Not really, what I did with mine is to tie 10 empty sealed one gallon milk jugs to each other and stuffed them into the voids under the cockpit seats with a string tied to a stick of wood that rests in the forward locker so that I could pull all of them out of there if I needed to. Did this on both sides and did it for added floatation. Other builders have sealed off those voids and added access ports on the seat footwell sides. This design aspect of Phil's really puzzled me. The forward compartment is huge, big enough for an adult to clime into, so storage is not even an issue.
      > > >
      > > > Enjoy the build, she is a great boat.
      > > >
      > > > Regards,
      > > >
      > > > Dennis
      > > > OldShoe "Pearl"
      > > > Bellingham, WA USA
      > > >
      > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Stefano" <gordas@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I bought OS plans and am having fun studying them. One question to actual users: are side stowages really reachable from front hatch (through holes in 'B' bulkhead? Or should I think of some opening in footwell sides to get there?
      > > > > Ste
      > > > > Italy
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.