Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

Expand Messages
  • Susanne@comcast.net
    AYRS is an odd phenomenon that way. We attended a meeting of the New England at Dick Newick s and they were discussing new projects and notions that Phil had
    Message 1 of 18 , Jan 8, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      AYRS is an odd phenomenon that way.  We attended a meeting of the New England at Dick Newick's and they were discussing new projects and notions that Phil had resolved a while back.  I think one such issue was the small centerboard way forward/large rudder aft geometry such as in CARTOPPER a long time ago, and St.VALERIE more recently.  They asked Phil no questions since they apparently did not know the work (Payson had been selling them fpor years by then, with many built and sailing).  There is a lot of good will and energy there but these blindspots are troubling.  We speculated that the UK-roots might result in less than favorable interest in US progress on unorthodox geometries, with 'Bolger' being particularly 'hard to swallow'.  How to explain, since Phil wrote in fine English ?!  We left the meeting disappointed and annoyed with having spent a better part of a day around that meeting to hear folks be all excited about 'settled' questions, with Phil obviously having no role in their universe...  All loss all around.   

      Similar vibes with the Junk Rig Association, which can feature good experimentation on selected details, but will not entertain much deviation from the 'pure' junk-rig credo.  The assumption seems to be that it is considered a 'rigor' and thus 'untouchable'.  Well, Phil and later us together 'do touch'
       alright...

      The curved-batten rig has been built and sailed on a slightly scaled-up derivative of that PROA design.
      Phil proposed it also on a 48' whaler/double-ended free-form hull cruiser/liveaboard.  More 3-D work on that sail-type would seem useful.

      I think that total conceptual output by Phil may indeed be unique in its diversity and getting experimentation done, usually quick&instructive.  It may indeed be 'too much' for many, certainly the glossy yacht magazines far away from WOODENBOAT. 

      Another example:  THE LANDING SCHOOL had no use for Phil's presence either when we went there once or twice or approached them during the WOODENBOAT SHOW for instance.  It's chief quipped into Phil's face that 'all it took to do a Bolger boat was to buy Payson's books'...  Not a bad start, but since he had nothing further to say, this cute one-liner reflected his sad state of ignorance.  Some of Phil's books are in their library.  I look forward when the combined canon and the catalogue will have to sit there in multiple copies...and becomes part of the curriculum of must-reads.  But not in Phil's life-time. 

      Phil's work and personal presence may have given many the fright of (for them) overwhelming design-intellectual range.  And quite a few did not know how to address him and his work appropriately.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: c.ruzer
      Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2011 5:35 AM
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

       



      Nasty sail control issues of this AYRS rig leading to condemnation of it by those proa guys has already been discussed here. People have tried the sail, been clobbered - there's suggested fixes - but as far as I'm aware none tested as yet. However, as I thought they might've thrown the baby out with the bath water I raised the important, really innovative, Bolger aspect in this design of lee-helm-bow-steering (LHBS), and all the work PCB did in that area over decades, and you know what, they hadn't seen that one for looking! LHBS comes way out of left field for them, and even though the respect for PB&F's authority is there, they haven't read the assorted works, and don't really get what PCB was on about with respect to potential LHBS benefits and multis, especially proas. The proa guys will mostly just ask that as they see CLR moving so far forward at speed where comes the lee helm?

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@...> wrote:
      >
      > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/MinimumProa/
      >
      > This looks like a 'head turner' cheap, fun and fast boat. It
      > disassembles into pieces so (depending on the choice of scantlings) it
      > could just barely be cartopped. Being a proa, it has two bows, and
      > "tacks" by slowing to a stop and then reversing directions. The sail
      > shape is determined by pre-curved laminated battens, and hence it
      > probably could be startlingly fast. (Except for the cumbersome tacking
      > procedure.)
      >
      > I create this isometric so that I could actually understand the PCB
      > devised bi-directional steering linkage. The "aft" steering fin is
      > locked straight, and the steering is done with the forward steering
      > fin (swapped fins depending on which end is going forward.)
      >

    • John and Kathy Trussell
      A sad fact is that many of the gurus in boat design and boat building work so hard in their own shops that they frequently are unaware of what goes on in
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 8, 2011
      • 0 Attachment

        A sad fact is that many of the ‘gurus’ in boat design and boat building work so hard in their own shops that they frequently are unaware of what goes on in other shops.  Moreover, they have a proprietorial pride in their own work and are often not receptive to better  or different ideas. This is particularly true since anyone can publish anything on the internet even if it is like the man who invented a machine to pull screws out of wood because no one ever told him to turn them…

         

        We all had to start some place and I have done some strange things in my boat building career. I try to read with an open mind and I sometimes learn a better way.

         

        JohnT

         


        From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto: bolger@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Susanne@...
        Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2011 9:01 AM
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

         

         

        AYRS is an odd phenomenon that way.  We attended a meeting of the New England at Dick Newick's and they were discussing new projects and notions that Phil had resolved a while back.  I think one such issue was the small centerboard way forward/large rudder aft geometry such as in CARTOPPER a long time ago, and St.VALERIE more recently.  They asked Phil no questions since they apparently did not know the work (Payson had been selling them fpor years by then, with many built and sailing).  There is a lot of good will and energy there but these blindspots are troubling.  We speculated that the UK-roots might result in less than favorable interest in US progress on unorthodox geometries, with 'Bolger' being particularly 'hard to swallow'.  How to explain, since Phil wrote in fine English ?!  We left the meeting disappointed and annoyed with having spent a better part of a day around that meeting to hear folks be all excited about 'settled' questions, with Phil obviously having no role in their universe...  All loss all around.   

        Similar vibes with the Junk Rig Association, which can feature good experimentation on selected details, but will not entertain much deviation from the 'pure' junk-rig credo.  The assumption seems to be that it is considered a 'rigor' and thus 'untouchable'.  Well, Phil and later us together 'do touch' alright...

        The curved-batten rig has been built and sailed on a slightly scaled-up derivative of that PROA design.
        Phil proposed it also on a 48' whaler/double-ended free-form hull cruiser/liveaboard.  More 3-D work on that sail-type would seem useful.

        I think that total conceptual output by Phil may indeed be unique in its diversity and getting experimentation done, usually quick&instructive.  It may indeed be 'too much' for many, certainly the glossy yacht magazines far away from WOODENBOAT. 

        Another example:  THE LANDING SCHOOL had no use for Phil's presence either when we went there once or twice or approached them during the WOODENBOAT SHOW for instance.  It's chief quipped into Phil's face that 'all it took to do a Bolger boat was to buy Payson's books'...  Not a bad start, but since he had nothing further to say, this cute one-liner reflected his sad state of ignorance.  Some of Phil's books are in their library.  I look forward when the combined canon and the catalogue will have to sit there in multiple copies...and becomes part of the curriculum of must-reads.  But not in Phil's life-time. 

        Phil's work and personal presence may have given many the fright of (for them) overwhelming design-intellectual range.  And quite a few did not know how to address him and his work appropriately.

        ----- Original Message -----

        From: c.ruzer

        Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2011 5:35 AM

        Subject: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

         

         



        Nasty sail control issues of this AYRS rig leading to condemnation of it by those proa guys has already been discussed here. People have tried the sail, been clobbered - there's suggested fixes - but as far as I'm aware none tested as yet. However, as I thought they might've thrown the baby out with the bath water I raised the important, really innovative, Bolger aspect in this design of lee-helm-bow-steering (LHBS), and all the work PCB did in that area over decades, and you know what, they hadn't seen that one for looking! LHBS comes way out of left field for them, and even though the respect for PB&F's authority is there, they haven't read the assorted works, and don't really get what PCB was on about with respect to potential LHBS benefits and multis, especially proas. The proa guys will mostly just ask that as they see CLR moving so far forward at speed where comes the lee helm?

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@...> wrote:
        >
        > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/MinimumProa/
        >
        > This looks like a 'head turner' cheap, fun and fast boat. It
        > disassembles into pieces so (depending on the choice of scantlings) it
        > could just barely be cartopped. Being a proa, it has two bows, and
        > "tacks" by slowing to a stop and then reversing directions. The sail
        > shape is determined by pre-curved laminated battens, and hence it
        > probably could be startlingly fast. (Except for the cumbersome tacking
        > procedure.)
        >
        > I create this isometric so that I could actually understand the PCB
        > devised bi-directional steering linkage. The "aft" steering fin is
        > locked straight, and the steering is done with the forward steering
        > fin (swapped fins depending on which end is going forward.)
        >

      • Bruce Hallman
        ... Speaking for myself, the mental process of physically working out the detailing of the 3-D of this sail and the steering fin geometry did plenty to satisfy
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 8, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          > More 3-D work on that sail-type would seem useful.

          Speaking for myself, the mental process of physically working out the
          detailing of the 3-D of this sail and the steering fin geometry did
          plenty to satisfy my curiosities.

          The next step, of building full scale would not be that large of an
          undertaking. This is the "minimum Proa" after all.

          The two boxes could hardly be easier, and they could be 1/4 plywood
          simply sprung around two bulkheads, and taped seamed. The mid-deck is
          nothing more than plywood nailed on framing lumber. The mast could be
          cut from a piece of Home Depot lumber too. It all could be fastened
          together with simple galvanized bolts. The sail battens could be
          laminated up to the curvature from 1/4 ripped strips of framing lumber
          and Elmer's glue, and attached to polytarp sailcloth using a staple
          gun. The most complex part might be the hinges for the steering fins,
          but in my mind, they amount to nothing more than 1/4" steel plate with
          a couple tabs welded on. Bought for $250 at the local metal fab shop.

          I am not sure what this "Nasty sail control issues" would be. It
          looks like that sail could easily be luffed, or dropped on a moments
          notice. The entire platform of the boat seems stable, and the intense
          sail handling would be done while standing with your feet in a secure
          stable place. (Much safer, I imagine, than some of the sail handling
          routinely done with jibs or genoas on tiny forward decks of most
          sloops.)

          If I didn't have a day job plus a couple dozen unfinished projects in
          my life, I bet a 'Minimum Proa' could be built in 4 weekends spare
          time.
        • Tom Sorensen
          here s an excellent issue by someone that actually tried the rig.  there were some issues that Bolger actually alluded too in his own review. The primary ones
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 8, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            here's an excellent issue by someone that actually tried the rig.  there were some issues that Bolger actually alluded too in his own review. The primary ones being the easily stalled fine leading edge, and the second being the sheeting issues.
             
            I've wondered if making it a permanently sheeted, rotating rig might be a good solution....
             
             
            Tom

            --- On Sat, 1/8/11, Bruce Hallman <hallman@...> wrote:

            From: Bruce Hallman <hallman@...>
            Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, January 8, 2011, 10:27 AM

             
            > More 3-D work on that sail-type would seem useful.

            Speaking for myself, the mental process of physically working out the
            detailing of the 3-D of this sail and the steering fin geometry did
            plenty to satisfy my curiosities.

            The next step, of building full scale would not be that large of an
            undertaking. This is the "minimum Proa" after all.

            The two boxes could hardly be easier, and they could be 1/4 plywood
            simply sprung around two bulkheads, and taped seamed. The mid-deck is
            nothing more than plywood nailed on framing lumber. The mast could be
            cut from a piece of Home Depot lumber too. It all could be fastened
            together with simple galvanized bolts. The sail battens could be
            laminated up to the curvature from 1/4 ripped strips of framing lumber
            and Elmer's glue, and attached to polytarp sailcloth using a staple
            gun. The most complex part might be the hinges for the steering fins,
            but in my mind, they amount to nothing more than 1/4" steel plate with
            a couple tabs welded on. Bought for $250 at the local metal fab shop.

            I am not sure what this "Nasty sail control issues" would be. It
            looks like that sail could easily be luffed, or dropped on a moments
            notice. The entire platform of the boat seems stable, and the intense
            sail handling would be done while standing with your feet in a secure
            stable place. (Much safer, I imagine, than some of the sail handling
            routinely done with jibs or genoas on tiny forward decks of most
            sloops.)

            If I didn't have a day job plus a couple dozen unfinished projects in
            my life, I bet a 'Minimum Proa' could be built in 4 weekends spare
            time.

          • Bruce Hallman
            ... Thanks, that article is eye opening. One snippet quote: There is simply not enough time during this power-on process to accomplish all the tasks needed to
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 9, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              On Sat, Jan 8, 2011 at 2:00 PM, Tom Sorensen <tdsoren@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > here's an excellent issue by someone that actually tried the rig.  there were some issues that Bolger actually alluded too in his own review. The primary ones being the easily stalled fine leading edge, and the second being the sheeting issues.
              >
              > I've wondered if making it a permanently sheeted, rotating rig might be a good solution....
              >
              > http://www.proafile.com/view/magazine/article/rig_options_bolger/
              >
              > Tom
              >

              Thanks, that article is eye opening.

              One snippet quote: "There is simply not enough time during this
              power-on process to accomplish all the tasks needed to reverse the
              boat, so one is left with finishing up the shunting process while the
              boat is screaming along at a mad rate."

              Certainly, this boat would get your adrenaline pumping!
            • Susanne@comcast.net
              Very interesting test-report on the Chistmas-Tree rig. I believe the only proa-based report we ever saw was Joe Norwood s piece on his scaled-up (10%?)
              Message 6 of 18 , Jan 9, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Very interesting test-report on the 'Chistmas-Tree' rig.
                I believe the only proa-based report we ever saw was Joe Norwood's piece on his scaled-up (10%?) Bolger-Proa-20.  Phil of course tried it on his CANARD, if memory serves correctly.

                It's been too long since we looked at that rig, see MAIB Vol24#1,2, and 4 (starting May 15, 2006):
                - I'd have to take time to think through why you could not control your rate of acceleration at the tail-end of the shunting-process
                - higher-wind correct reefing-options should help more, as Part 3 of that series on the 60 shows very 'civilized' proportions of areas emerging ahead and behind the axes.
                - while there seems some dogma that Proas should always be smaller, the 60-footer's two-masted rig might offer further balance and trim-options, assuming speed-control and thus shunting-speed control are doable.
                Very good reference.  More work to do...
                Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, January 09, 2011 1:00 PM
                Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

                 

                On Sat, Jan 8, 2011 at 2:00 PM, Tom Sorensen <tdsoren@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > here's an excellent issue by someone that actually tried the rig.  there were some issues that Bolger actually alluded too in his own review. The primary ones being the easily stalled fine leading edge, and the second being the sheeting issues.
                >
                > I've wondered if making it a permanently sheeted, rotating rig might be a good solution....
                >
                > http://www.proafile.com/view/magazine/article/rig_options_bolger/
                >
                > Tom
                >

                Thanks, that article is eye opening.

                One snippet quote: "There is simply not enough time during this
                power-on process to accomplish all the tasks needed to reverse the
                boat, so one is left with finishing up the shunting process while the
                boat is screaming along at a mad rate."

                Certainly, this boat would get your adrenaline pumping!

              • KK7B
                Hi Susanne and Group, Phil Bolger s influence extends well beyond boats. I dabble in boat and rig design evenings and weekends, but I am an electronic
                Message 7 of 18 , Jan 9, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Susanne and Group,

                  Phil Bolger's influence extends well beyond boats. I dabble in boat and rig design evenings and weekends, but I am an electronic designer by profession. All of his books are close at hand, and I regularly read through a few pages of "Boats with and Open Mind" when I need to get unstuck on a radio design problem. Phil's basic philosophy of the quick experiment to test an interesting idea backed up by some theory and analysis is how I work in the lab. Reading his work is a constant reminder to view beautiful old ways of doing things with affection....but also with real interest and a critical and creative eye.

                  Regarding Wooden Boats, Junks and good old stuff in general--anything more than a few generations old may be surrounded by reverent and appreciative folks who aren't thinking much about radically different approaches to the problem. Those of us with the design gene are often unwelcome in such company. Strangely enough, some of the old unsolved problems and quirks are also viewed with reverence...

                  I spent some time aboard my friend Bob Larkin's Birdwatcher at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival this past year, and overheard comments from all camps. Several of the most outspoken described it as the best boat there.

                  Thank you for your continued presence on this web site. It is much appreciated.

                  Best Regards,

                  Rick


                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > AYRS is an odd phenomenon that way. We attended a meeting of the New England at Dick Newick's and they were discussing new projects and notions that Phil had resolved a while back. I think one such issue was the small centerboard way forward/large rudder aft geometry such as in CARTOPPER a long time ago, and St.VALERIE more recently. They asked Phil no questions since they apparently did not know the work (Payson had been selling them fpor years by then, with many built and sailing). There is a lot of good will and energy there but these blindspots are troubling. We speculated that the UK-roots might result in less than favorable interest in US progress on unorthodox geometries, with 'Bolger' being particularly 'hard to swallow'. How to explain, since Phil wrote in fine English ?! We left the meeting disappointed and annoyed with having spent a better part of a day around that meeting to hear folks be all excited about 'settled' questions, with Phil obviously having no role in their universe... All loss all around.
                  >
                  > Similar vibes with the Junk Rig Association, which can feature good experimentation on selected details, but will not entertain much deviation from the 'pure' junk-rig credo. The assumption seems to be that it is considered a 'rigor' and thus 'untouchable'. Well, Phil and later us together 'do touch' alright...
                  >
                  > The curved-batten rig has been built and sailed on a slightly scaled-up derivative of that PROA design.
                  > Phil proposed it also on a 48' whaler/double-ended free-form hull cruiser/liveaboard. More 3-D work on that sail-type would seem useful.
                  >
                  > I think that total conceptual output by Phil may indeed be unique in its diversity and getting experimentation done, usually quick&instructive. It may indeed be 'too much' for many, certainly the glossy yacht magazines far away from WOODENBOAT.
                  >
                  > Another example: THE LANDING SCHOOL had no use for Phil's presence either when we went there once or twice or approached them during the WOODENBOAT SHOW for instance. It's chief quipped into Phil's face that 'all it took to do a Bolger boat was to buy Payson's books'... Not a bad start, but since he had nothing further to say, this cute one-liner reflected his sad state of ignorance. Some of Phil's books are in their library. I look forward when the combined canon and the catalogue will have to sit there in multiple copies...and becomes part of the curriculum of must-reads. But not in Phil's life-time.
                  >
                  > Phil's work and personal presence may have given many the fright of (for them) overwhelming design-intellectual range. And quite a few did not know how to address him and his work appropriately.
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: c.ruzer
                  > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2011 5:35 AM
                  > Subject: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Nasty sail control issues of this AYRS rig leading to condemnation of it by those proa guys has already been discussed here. People have tried the sail, been clobbered - there's suggested fixes - but as far as I'm aware none tested as yet. However, as I thought they might've thrown the baby out with the bath water I raised the important, really innovative, Bolger aspect in this design of lee-helm-bow-steering (LHBS), and all the work PCB did in that area over decades, and you know what, they hadn't seen that one for looking! LHBS comes way out of left field for them, and even though the respect for PB&F's authority is there, they haven't read the assorted works, and don't really get what PCB was on about with respect to potential LHBS benefits and multis, especially proas. The proa guys will mostly just ask that as they see CLR moving so far forward at speed where comes the lee helm?
                  >
                  > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/MinimumProa/
                  > >
                  > > This looks like a 'head turner' cheap, fun and fast boat. It
                  > > disassembles into pieces so (depending on the choice of scantlings) it
                  > > could just barely be cartopped. Being a proa, it has two bows, and
                  > > "tacks" by slowing to a stop and then reversing directions. The sail
                  > > shape is determined by pre-curved laminated battens, and hence it
                  > > probably could be startlingly fast. (Except for the cumbersome tacking
                  > > procedure.)
                  > >
                  > > I create this isometric so that I could actually understand the PCB
                  > > devised bi-directional steering linkage. The "aft" steering fin is
                  > > locked straight, and the steering is done with the forward steering
                  > > fin (swapped fins depending on which end is going forward.)
                  > >
                  >
                • c.ruzer
                  Hi. Possibly redundant, but to note coincidently that the Proafile Bolger/AYRS test report author, John Dalziel, also posted here Jan 8th re AS 29. (
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jan 9, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi. Possibly redundant, but to note coincidently that the Proafile Bolger/AYRS test report author, John Dalziel, also posted here Jan 8th re AS 29. ( http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/65236 ) He may not have seen this concurrent thread. It's perhaps an old, and complex topic... I'm not sure how much John is still into proa sailing, but Kevin sure still is into the topic, and with the "need for speed", eg http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/34451

                    Many proaphiles seem to be settling for the practical advantages of COA shifting offered by twin masted rigs... amongst other things.



                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Very interesting test-report on the 'Chistmas-Tree' rig.
                    > I believe the only proa-based report we ever saw was Joe Norwood's piece on his scaled-up (10%?) Bolger-Proa-20. Phil of course tried it on his CANARD, if memory serves correctly.
                    >
                    > It's been too long since we looked at that rig, see MAIB Vol24#1,2, and 4 (starting May 15, 2006):
                    > - I'd have to take time to think through why you could not control your rate of acceleration at the tail-end of the shunting-process
                    > - higher-wind correct reefing-options should help more, as Part 3 of that series on the 60 shows very 'civilized' proportions of areas emerging ahead and behind the axes.
                    > - while there seems some dogma that Proas should always be smaller, the 60-footer's two-masted rig might offer further balance and trim-options, assuming speed-control and thus shunting-speed control are doable.
                    >
                    > Very good reference. More work to do...
                    > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                  • Susanne@comcast.net
                    Good Morning Rick, what a nice posting to start my day with. Obviously Phil would quietly agree with your judgment... Yes, the reverence -thing seems like an
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jan 10, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Good Morning Rick,
                           what a nice posting to start my day with.  Obviously Phil would quietly agree with your judgment...
                      Yes, the 'reverence'-thing seems like an 'Ersatz-Religion' - a sometimes deeply emotional connection to a particular flavor/geometry - with at times quite virulent reactions to perceived slights and actual doubt about those unaddressed problems/short-comings if not outright practical dangers. 

                      Phil was not shy questioning his own judgment in-house on some issue, something I did give rise to as well.  Upon extended discussions he would revise some long-held perspectives.

                      We've always thought that there ought to be BIRDWATCHERS all over the place in light of their virtues.  On the other hand, most magazines defend their 'reverence' for deeper-draft geometries and synthetic-chemical-soaked dismissal of plywood as any 'plausible' structural material. "And all that glass is just not sea-worthy..." must be balanced with the liabilities of 'their' preferred types.  But I think we'll get there yet...

                      Susanne Altenburger, PB&F  


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: KK7B
                      Sent: Sunday, January 09, 2011 11:32 PM
                      Subject: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

                       

                      Hi Susanne and Group,

                      Phil Bolger's influence extends well beyond boats. I dabble in boat and rig design evenings and weekends, but I am an electronic designer by profession. All of his books are close at hand, and I regularly read through a few pages of "Boats with and Open Mind" when I need to get unstuck on a radio design problem. Phil's basic philosophy of the quick experiment to test an interesting idea backed up by some theory and analysis is how I work in the lab. Reading his work is a constant reminder to view beautiful old ways of doing things with affection....but also with real interest and a critical and creative eye.

                      Regarding Wooden Boats, Junks and good old stuff in general--anything more than a few generations old may be surrounded by reverent and appreciative folks who aren't thinking much about radically different approaches to the problem. Those of us with the design gene are often unwelcome in such company. Strangely enough, some of the old unsolved problems and quirks are also viewed with reverence...

                      I spent some time aboard my friend Bob Larkin's Birdwatcher at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival this past year, and overheard comments from all camps. Several of the most outspoken described it as the best boat there.

                      Thank you for your continued presence on this web site. It is much appreciated.

                      Best Regards,

                      Rick

                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > AYRS is an odd phenomenon that way. We attended a meeting of the New England at Dick Newick's and they were discussing new projects and notions that Phil had resolved a while back. I think one such issue was the small centerboard way forward/large rudder aft geometry such as in CARTOPPER a long time ago, and St.VALERIE more recently. They asked Phil no questions since they apparently did not know the work (Payson had been selling them fpor years by then, with many built and sailing). There is a lot of good will and energy there but these blindspots are troubling. We speculated that the UK-roots might result in less than favorable interest in US progress on unorthodox geometries, with 'Bolger' being particularly 'hard to swallow'. How to explain, since Phil wrote in fine English ?! We left the meeting disappointed and annoyed with having spent a better part of a day around that meeting to hear folks be all excited about 'settled' questions, with Phil obviously having no role in their universe... All loss all around.
                      >
                      > Similar vibes with the Junk Rig Association, which can feature good experimentation on selected details, but will not entertain much deviation from the 'pure' junk-rig credo. The assumption seems to be that it is considered a 'rigor' and thus 'untouchable'. Well, Phil and later us together 'do touch' alright...
                      >
                      > The curved-batten rig has been built and sailed on a slightly scaled-up derivative of that PROA design.
                      > Phil proposed it also on a 48' whaler/double-ended free-form hull cruiser/liveaboard. More 3-D work on that sail-type would seem useful.
                      >
                      > I think that total conceptual output by Phil may indeed be unique in its diversity and getting experimentation done, usually quick&instructive. It may indeed be 'too much' for many, certainly the glossy yacht magazines far away from WOODENBOAT.
                      >
                      > Another example: THE LANDING SCHOOL had no use for Phil's presence either when we went there once or twice or approached them during the WOODENBOAT SHOW for instance. It's chief quipped into Phil's face that 'all it took to do a Bolger boat was to buy Payson's books'... Not a bad start, but since he had nothing further to say, this cute one-liner reflected his sad state of ignorance. Some of Phil's books are in their library. I look forward when the combined canon and the catalogue will have to sit there in multiple copies...and becomes part of the curriculum of must-reads. But not in Phil's life-time.
                      >
                      > Phil's work and personal presence may have given many the fright of (for them) overwhelming design-intellectual range. And quite a few did not know how to address him and his work appropriately.
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: c.ruzer
                      > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2011 5:35 AM
                      > Subject: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Nasty sail control issues of this AYRS rig leading to condemnation of it by those proa guys has already been discussed here. People have tried the sail, been clobbered - there's suggested fixes - but as far as I'm aware none tested as yet. However, as I thought they might've thrown the baby out with the bath water I raised the important, really innovative, Bolger aspect in this design of lee-helm-bow-steering (LHBS), and all the work PCB did in that area over decades, and you know what, they hadn't seen that one for looking! LHBS comes way out of left field for them, and even though the respect for PB&F's authority is there, they haven't read the assorted works, and don't really get what PCB was on about with respect to potential LHBS benefits and multis, especially proas. The proa guys will mostly just ask that as they see CLR moving so far forward at speed where comes the lee helm?
                      >
                      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/MinimumProa/
                      > >
                      > > This looks like a 'head turner' cheap, fun and fast boat. It
                      > > disassembles into pieces so (depending on the choice of scantlings) it
                      > > could just barely be cartopped. Being a proa, it has two bows, and
                      > > "tacks" by slowing to a stop and then reversing directions. The sail
                      > > shape is determined by pre-curved laminated battens, and hence it
                      > > probably could be startlingly fast. (Except for the cumbersome tacking
                      > > procedure.)
                      > >
                      > > I create this isometric so that I could actually understand the PCB
                      > > devised bi-directional steering linkage. The "aft" steering fin is
                      > > locked straight, and the steering is done with the forward steering
                      > > fin (swapped fins depending on which end is going forward.)
                      > >
                      >

                    • etap28
                      I definitely have the experimental gene, and was always treading a fine line with my boaty pals where I lived, who were, and are, steeped in the most
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jan 10, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I definitely have the experimental gene, and was always treading a fine line with my boaty pals where I lived, who were, and are, steeped in the most conservative boat dogma, the apex of which they rather arbitrarily seemed to have fixed at somewhere between 1890 and 1940. Sure, there's nothing wrong with a 3/4 keel ketch or sloop or schooner with stayed rigs, spoon bow, counter stern...
                        My Skimmer was mocked lightly as "a boat with corners" by an eminent boat builder who shall remain nameless, though they hired me on anyway (of course I dusted his 40 footer downwind one day. .. )



                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "KK7B" <kk7b@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Susanne and Group,
                        >
                        > Phil Bolger's influence extends well beyond boats. I dabble in boat and rig design evenings and weekends, but I am an electronic designer by profession. All of his books are close at hand, and I regularly read through a few pages of "Boats with and Open Mind" when I need to get unstuck on a radio design problem. Phil's basic philosophy of the quick experiment to test an interesting idea backed up by some theory and analysis is how I work in the lab. Reading his work is a constant reminder to view beautiful old ways of doing things with affection....but also with real interest and a critical and creative eye.
                        >
                        > Regarding Wooden Boats, Junks and good old stuff in general--anything more than a few generations old may be surrounded by reverent and appreciative folks who aren't thinking much about radically different approaches to the problem. Those of us with the design gene are often unwelcome in such company. Strangely enough, some of the old unsolved problems and quirks are also viewed with reverence...
                        >
                        > I spent some time aboard my friend Bob Larkin's Birdwatcher at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival this past year, and overheard comments from all camps. Several of the most outspoken described it as the best boat there.
                        >
                        > Thank you for your continued presence on this web site. It is much appreciated.
                        >
                        > Best Regards,
                        >
                        > Rick
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@" <philbolger@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > AYRS is an odd phenomenon that way. We attended a meeting of the New England at Dick Newick's and they were discussing new projects and notions that Phil had resolved a while back. I think one such issue was the small centerboard way forward/large rudder aft geometry such as in CARTOPPER a long time ago, and St.VALERIE more recently. They asked Phil no questions since they apparently did not know the work (Payson had been selling them fpor years by then, with many built and sailing). There is a lot of good will and energy there but these blindspots are troubling. We speculated that the UK-roots might result in less than favorable interest in US progress on unorthodox geometries, with 'Bolger' being particularly 'hard to swallow'. How to explain, since Phil wrote in fine English ?! We left the meeting disappointed and annoyed with having spent a better part of a day around that meeting to hear folks be all excited about 'settled' questions, with Phil obviously having no role in their universe... All loss all around.
                        > >
                        > > Similar vibes with the Junk Rig Association, which can feature good experimentation on selected details, but will not entertain much deviation from the 'pure' junk-rig credo. The assumption seems to be that it is considered a 'rigor' and thus 'untouchable'. Well, Phil and later us together 'do touch' alright...
                        > >
                        > > The curved-batten rig has been built and sailed on a slightly scaled-up derivative of that PROA design.
                        > > Phil proposed it also on a 48' whaler/double-ended free-form hull cruiser/liveaboard. More 3-D work on that sail-type would seem useful.
                        > >
                        > > I think that total conceptual output by Phil may indeed be unique in its diversity and getting experimentation done, usually quick&instructive. It may indeed be 'too much' for many, certainly the glossy yacht magazines far away from WOODENBOAT.
                        > >
                        > > Another example: THE LANDING SCHOOL had no use for Phil's presence either when we went there once or twice or approached them during the WOODENBOAT SHOW for instance. It's chief quipped into Phil's face that 'all it took to do a Bolger boat was to buy Payson's books'... Not a bad start, but since he had nothing further to say, this cute one-liner reflected his sad state of ignorance. Some of Phil's books are in their library. I look forward when the combined canon and the catalogue will have to sit there in multiple copies...and becomes part of the curriculum of must-reads. But not in Phil's life-time.
                        > >
                        > > Phil's work and personal presence may have given many the fright of (for them) overwhelming design-intellectual range. And quite a few did not know how to address him and his work appropriately.
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: c.ruzer
                        > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2011 5:35 AM
                        > > Subject: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Nasty sail control issues of this AYRS rig leading to condemnation of it by those proa guys has already been discussed here. People have tried the sail, been clobbered - there's suggested fixes - but as far as I'm aware none tested as yet. However, as I thought they might've thrown the baby out with the bath water I raised the important, really innovative, Bolger aspect in this design of lee-helm-bow-steering (LHBS), and all the work PCB did in that area over decades, and you know what, they hadn't seen that one for looking! LHBS comes way out of left field for them, and even though the respect for PB&F's authority is there, they haven't read the assorted works, and don't really get what PCB was on about with respect to potential LHBS benefits and multis, especially proas. The proa guys will mostly just ask that as they see CLR moving so far forward at speed where comes the lee helm?
                        > >
                        > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/MinimumProa/
                        > > >
                        > > > This looks like a 'head turner' cheap, fun and fast boat. It
                        > > > disassembles into pieces so (depending on the choice of scantlings) it
                        > > > could just barely be cartopped. Being a proa, it has two bows, and
                        > > > "tacks" by slowing to a stop and then reversing directions. The sail
                        > > > shape is determined by pre-curved laminated battens, and hence it
                        > > > probably could be startlingly fast. (Except for the cumbersome tacking
                        > > > procedure.)
                        > > >
                        > > > I create this isometric so that I could actually understand the PCB
                        > > > devised bi-directional steering linkage. The "aft" steering fin is
                        > > > locked straight, and the steering is done with the forward steering
                        > > > fin (swapped fins depending on which end is going forward.)
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • c.ruzer
                        A 4 tonner? Proa investigations toward a 40ft AS-like-hulled cruising build, and other developments: Bolger Advanced Sharpie like Proa, now with Videos.
                        Message 11 of 18 , Sep 3, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          A 4 tonner? Proa investigations toward a 40ft AS-like-hulled cruising build, and other developments:

                          "Bolger Advanced Sharpie like Proa, now with Videos." http://proafile.com/forums/viewthread/93/


                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:

                          > Very interesting test-report on the 'Chistmas-Tree' rig.
                          > I believe the only proa-based report we ever saw was Joe Norwood's piece on his scaled-up (10%?) Bolger-Proa-20. Phil of course tried it on his CANARD, if memory serves correctly.

                          > It's been too long since we looked at that rig, see MAIB Vol24#1,2, and 4 (starting May 15, 2006):
                          > - I'd have to take time to think through why you could not control your rate of acceleration at the tail-end of the shunting-process
                          > - higher-wind correct reefing-options should help more, as Part 3 of that series on the 60 shows very 'civilized' proportions of areas emerging ahead and behind the axes.
                          > - while there seems some dogma that Proas should always be smaller, the 60-footer's two-masted rig might offer further balance and trim-options, assuming speed-control and thus shunting-speed control are doable.

                          > Very good reference. More work to do...
                          > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F

                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: Bruce Hallman
                          > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Sunday, January 09, 2011 1:00 PM
                          > Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

                          > On Sat, Jan 8, 2011 at 2:00 PM, Tom Sorensen <tdsoren@...> wrote:

                          > > here's an excellent issue by someone that actually tried the rig. there were some issues that Bolger actually alluded too in his own review. The primary ones being the easily stalled fine leading edge, and the second being the sheeting issues.

                          > > I've wondered if making it a permanently sheeted, rotating rig might be a good solution....

                          http://www.proafile.com/view/magazine/article/rig_options_bolger/

                          > > Tom

                          > Thanks, that article is eye opening.
                          >
                          > One snippet quote: "There is simply not enough time during this
                          > power-on process to accomplish all the tasks needed to reverse the
                          > boat, so one is left with finishing up the shunting process while the
                          > boat is screaming along at a mad rate."

                          > Certainly, this boat would get your adrenaline pumping!
                        • c.ruzer
                          Joe Norwood s _Practical Proas_ report to the AYRS on the Minimum Proa and that rig is at page 42 here http://www.ayrs.org/Catalyst_N03_Jan_2001.pdf (He found
                          Message 12 of 18 , Nov 21, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Joe Norwood's _Practical Proas_ report to the AYRS on the Minimum Proa and that rig is at page 42 here http://www.ayrs.org/Catalyst_N03_Jan_2001.pdf (He found the steering to be good, indeed the boat appears to have given him much pleasure.)

                            To refresh, others found the rig problematic http://proafile.com/archive/article/rig_options_bolger
                            however the fascination http://proafile.com/archive/article/the_zen_of_proa continues with further developments under way in search of the well mannered quick bidirectional cambered shunting sail
                            http://proafile.com/forums/viewthread/124/
                            Perhaps, as is suggested there, in the earlier trial excessive roach was a problem?

                            ~
                            ~ ^ ~
                            / \
                            / | \
                            <___________>



                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:

                            > Very interesting test-report on the 'Chistmas-Tree' rig.
                            > I believe the only proa-based report we ever saw was Joe Norwood's piece on his scaled-up (10%?) Bolger-Proa-20. Phil of course tried it on his CANARD, if memory serves correctly.
                            >
                            > It's been too long since we looked at that rig, see MAIB Vol24#1,2, and 4 (starting May 15, 2006):
                            > - I'd have to take time to think through why you could not control your rate of acceleration at the tail-end of the shunting-process
                            > - higher-wind correct reefing-options should help more, as Part 3 of that series on the 60 shows very 'civilized' proportions of areas emerging ahead and behind the axes.
                            > - while there seems some dogma that Proas should always be smaller, the 60-footer's two-masted rig might offer further balance and trim-options, assuming speed-control and thus shunting-speed control are doable.
                            >
                            > Very good reference. More work to do...
                            > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F

                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: Bruce Hallman
                            > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Sunday, January 09, 2011 1:00 PM
                            > Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Isometric, 19ft6in 'Minimum Proa'

                            > On Sat, Jan 8, 2011 at 2:00 PM, Tom Sorensen <tdsoren@...> wrote:
                            > > here's an excellent issue by someone that actually tried the rig. there were some issues that Bolger actually alluded too in his own review. The primary ones being the easily stalled fine leading edge, and the second being the sheeting issues.
                            > > I've wondered if making it a permanently sheeted, rotating rig might be a good solution....

                            http://www.proafile.com/view/magazine/article/rig_options_bolger/
                            > >
                            > > Tom

                            > Thanks, that article is eye opening.
                            >
                            > One snippet quote: "There is simply not enough time during this
                            > power-on process to accomplish all the tasks needed to reverse the
                            > boat, so one is left with finishing up the shunting process while the
                            > boat is screaming along at a mad rate."
                            >
                            > Certainly, this boat would get your adrenaline pumping!
                          • c.ruzer
                            I thought the Bolger proas were sorted in the group designs list database. I m sure I entered one or two myself some years ago. I went to that cupboard and let
                            Message 13 of 18 , Nov 22, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I thought the Bolger proas were sorted in the group designs list database.


                              I'm sure I entered one or two myself some years ago. I went to that cupboard and let me tell ya it's pretty bare, and it's - Arrrggghhhh! - it's confusion all over again. There's so much confusion and confounding of things to do with the Bolger proa effort out there on the intertubes. I'll have a go at straightening it out a bit. I don't have all the reference material I'd like to have, and it's somewhat patchy, for example, page number determinations but not the publication issue. So if you'll bear with me, lengthy post, and please correct any errors...



                              I've clipped that Catalyst photo of Joe Norwood minimum proa sailing ( http://www.ayrs.org/Catalyst_N03_Jan_2001.pdf it's also a BoD article illustration) and will later stick it in the Photos section, and I'll add some entries to the designs database later. But first to somehow get it better sorted, at least in my mind, a bit of background...


                              And a bit of note taking.

                              Bolger Proa 20 Design #664, 19'6" x 10'0" x 147sf (MAIB V21N06 pp27-31): [The Concept Study was Proa 19'6" x 10'5" x 95sf BWAOM Chapter 24 (aka Minimum Proa - AYRS Xmas-tree sail - two independent kick-up rudders mounted toward midships and cantilevered to windward of the vaka), 95sf rig tested prior to MiniP on Canard Design #440 (was prior SBJ#70 Cartoon "South Seas Proa", see http://hallman.org/bolger/isometrics and especially http://hallman.org/sbj/70/ {NB. SBJ media pdf<=65, gif<=68?})]



                              #664 Proa 20 now has the rudders [robust aluminium those, plus stout leeboard (off the lee of a proa!) 360 degree articulated amidships - 170 degrees of that a clr fine adjustment from tiller] moved to the very bows, one at each end of the vaka (main hull) with, wait for it, a single tiller. Ah-ha! Recall, from Canard Chapter 23 BWAOM page 112, for example, "If I design another bow-steerer, I will arrange the two fins to be independently steerable for balance adjustment, but interconnected for sharp turns in such a way that the ends of the boat both swing around the center of gravity. An America's Cup boat with such a layout was astonishingly competitive, considering how radical the concept was. (I had nothing to do with her design except to admire its boldness.)" But wait again, no, here the rudders free in two planes are always either one kicked up (the current bow) or both up - freed as it were by the leeboard control. Rudder steering response is also adjustable by gearing. It may sound like these controls, linkage routing, endless loops are a busy worried complex thing, but it seems to be all simplicated in a remarkable way at the almost common tiller and mast axis - the cable routing becomes cleverly very direct, so much so I think I may call the tiller what it seems to be - a joy stick! Improved mast staying, bigger sail of lower aspect, 2HP Honda, two 'bridges' for trimming crew weight aft - and a volunteer promising to build in Noumea.



                              Plans price for #664 isn't mentioned in that MAIB BoD article (there will be a number of plans sheets). Also, the preceeding issue had a 2 page BoD article, "Proa Background" (MAIB V21N05), covering Micronesia, rig issues, Anson's drawing, Munroe, LFH, Minimum Proa study concept, steering, Xmas-tree, Joe Norwood (Minimum Proa sailing photo... his previous proa publications), the Netherlands Minimum Proa speed experience of Vincent de Bode with a windsurfer adapted rig but limited by aft rocker (it looks to me from the MAIB illustrations that #664 has finer hulls and flatter rocker towards the bows); and so on to the design of an improved version for a committed New Caledonian volunteer builder, and the subject of the subsequent issue covered already above.



                              Then later (MAIB V24N01 pp.26-28 Bolger Proa-60 Pt 1 5/15/2005 - I am only sure of the page numbers for this reference) there's the concept study of a large cruising "Bolger Proa-60", 60'0" x 25'6" x 1'6" x 1600/2sf, with tabernacled lowereing two masted refined Xmas-tree rig, partially lateral plane loaded rudders mounted within articulating bows of the vaka, two centreboards in the ama, capsize mitigating self-correcting geometry, asymetric reserve bouyancy, sail panels of differentially weighted cloth, differentially cambered sail panels according to height with additionally electrically actuated differential sail panel camber adjustment, a third sail flown from the mastheads brace...


                              The next MAIB BoD article MAIB V24N02 Bolger Proa-60 Pt 2, and another later still, MAIB V24 N06 Proa 60 Pt 3, have more detail on handling this Proa-60 rig, dicussion of the hull structures, the ergonomics... and sundries such as dinghies and auxiliary propulsion. Bruce Hallman has given us an index at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/61756 From that we may be better able to check what's been published on the proas as concepts and designs, and maybe what has been built....



                              Now the business:



                              Connected in some way with Bolger proa design there is published and/or built:


                              1. Proa, Design #217, 39'6" x 19'6"; The Folding Schooner, Chapter 15, p91. (I'm not so sure this was built)



                              2. South Seas Proa, aka Minimum Proa, aka AYRS or Xmas-tree or Christmas tree proa, 19'6" x 10'5" x 95sf; both as Cartoon in SBJ#70 and Concept Study in BWAOM, Chapter 24, p116. (2 boats known - associated by most with Joseph Norwood's boat) http://hallman.org/sbj/70/ http://www.ayrs.org/Catalyst_N03_Jan_2001.pdf page 42



                              3. Proa 20, Design #664, 19'6" x 10'0" x 147sf; MAIB V21N06, pp27-31. (MAIB V21 N06 Bolger Proa 20 Pg 1 A boat built in Noumea?)



                              4. James Wharram Designs designed and built a 30ft proa with, allegedly, a Bolger proa rig. They certainly built a proa.



                              5. Michael Schacht (proafile.com) built a proa with a test Bolger Proa Rig



                              6. John Dalziel (AS29 skipper, Yahoo proafile group owner, and member of this group) built a proa with a test Bolger Proa Rig



                              And further, in literature only there is:



                              7. Proa Background Pg 1 MAIB V21N05



                              8. Bolger Proa-60, Concept Study, 60'0" x 25'6" x 1'6" x 1600/2sf; Bolger on Design Pt 1 (5/15/2005) MAIB V24N01, pp.26-28.



                              9. Bolger Proa-60 Pt 2 MAIB V24N02



                              10. Bolger Proa-60 Pt 3 MAIB V24N06



                              Looks like 3 boats to enter in the design databse. It's a start anyway. Gotta getta sleep.





                              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Joe Norwood's _Practical Proas_ report to the AYRS on the Minimum Proa and that rig is at page 42 here http://www.ayrs.org/Catalyst_N03_Jan_2001.pdf (He found the steering to be good, indeed the boat appears to have given him much pleasure.)
                              >
                              > To refresh, others found the rig problematic http://proafile.com/archive/article/rig_options_bolger
                              > however the fascination http://proafile.com/archive/article/the_zen_of_proa continues with further developments under way in search of the well mannered quick bidirectional cambered shunting sail
                              > http://proafile.com/forums/viewthread/124/
                              > Perhaps, as is suggested there, in the earlier trial excessive roach was a problem?
                              >
                              > ~
                              > ~ ^ ~
                              > / \
                              > / | \
                              > <___________>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@" <philbolger@> wrote:
                              >
                              > > Very interesting test-report on the 'Chistmas-Tree' rig.
                              > > I believe the only proa-based report we ever saw was Joe Norwood's piece on his scaled-up (10%?) Bolger-Proa-20. Phil of course tried it on his CANARD, if memory serves correctly.
                            • BruceHallman
                              Thanks for the research, I updated the listing I keep with these 3 boats to synchronize. I am missing images of Proa 20 and Proa 60, though I will go digging
                              Message 14 of 18 , Nov 26, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Thanks for the research, I updated the listing I keep with these 3 boats to synchronize.  I am missing images of Proa 20 and Proa 60, though I will go digging through stacks of paper to see if I can find those MAIB's.



                                > Looks like 3 boats to enter in the design databse. It's a start anyway. Gotta getta sleep.

                              • c.ruzer
                                Bruce, thanks again. If it s of some assistance, the Minimum Proa colour pic of the 5% enlarged and otherwise altered Joe Norwood version is now here
                                Message 15 of 18 , Nov 27, 2012
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Bruce,

                                  thanks again. If it's of some assistance, the 'Minimum Proa' colour pic of the 5% enlarged and otherwise altered Joe Norwood version is now here http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/photos/album/383252329/pic/list

                                  The above Joseph Norwood photo as b&w is also in the "Proa Background" article (MAIB V21NO5) along with the 'proa concept study' drawing lines (ie., 'minimum proa', 'cartoon'... / BWAOM, SBJ), and also the historic lines of Anson and Munroe.

                                  The Proa 20 (sic)(V21NO6) has boat photos (one afloat, one on trailer, of the Noumean boat?); a photo of a sail lying on the ground (Norwood's?); a three views lines drawing; and an explanatory captioned cartoon of the recommended shunting procedure that's more developed than that seen in BWAOM or SBJ.

                                  The wonderful Proa-60 (sic) respective MAIB images are astounding lines illustrations in V24N01, V24N02, and V24N06.

                                  Of course I'd like a Proa-60 one, yet I'm pro a 20 too!


                                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, BruceHallman <hallman@...> wrote:
                                  > I am missing images of Proa 20 and Proa 60, though I will go digging through stacks of paper to see if I can find those MAIB's.
                                • c.ruzer
                                  Maybe two more branches to add to this tree... There are other proas big and small based pretty much on the hull shape but diverging in the rudder/leeway
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Dec 3, 2012
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Maybe two more branches to add to this tree... There are other proas big and small based pretty much on the hull shape but diverging in the rudder/leeway and/or sail (sloop) treatment. However, if Cod's double ended Dynamite Sailboard proa experiment kept to the una rig then it seems to me it's following pretty much in the Minimum Proa ideas. The other that's come to mind is, of course, the Jim Michalak Gizmo design.

                                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:

                                    > Of course I'd like a Proa-60 one, yet I'm pro a 20 too!
                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.