Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: (Lost) New Years Greetings

Expand Messages
  • Walter
    ... Happy New Year to you, Susanne. Best of luck in the coming year. Your recent article in MAIB, on the Matsue Traveler Study, was a great insight into how a
    Message 1 of 21 , Jan 3, 2011
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:
      >
      > This message seems to gotten lost in YAHOO world somehow.
      > So I re-post it some 11 hours later:
      >
      > "Good Morning on this first day of 2011. I wish you all a good year.
      >
      > I would like to thank you for your continuing interest in Phil's and our work.
      > I hope that the re-establishment of the monthly Design-column in MAIB keeps feeding your curiosity and engagement in our thinking on boats, how to use them, and where to build them. Note this month's feature on the preliminary design of "AS-34". Next month will be an update from the world of fisheries-policy and the working waterfront of Gloucester, essentially a summary of 2 projects of 2010 that I faced myself devoting serious time to, even though I already had an urgent agenda to tend to both in private matters and business, primarily of course securing and enhancing the legacy of Phil Bolger. One motivating factor in the constructive engagement of these two issues was the further broadening of relative relevance of Phil Bolger's thinking both on local level and in the discourse amongst high-level experts.
      >
      > As Bruce Hallman alerted you to already, Phil Bolger & Friends was invited late February '10 to give a presentation at the first international conference on "Energy Use in Fisheries" in Seattle, Nov. 14-17,'10, sponsored by NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration) - a branch of the US government, the WORLD BANK and the UN-FAO (U.N. Fisheries and Agriculture Organization). Experts from 18 nations offered perspectives, with me amongst them (quite unexpectedly). MAIB will feature my report on it. It was and remains gratifying indeed to put Phil's and my work into that forum of discussion. That high-level recognition of the fundamental legitimacy of our perspective should contribute to the likelihood of at last getting craft built and tested across 4-seasons.
      >
      > The other project is directly related to the viability of this Port and its working and pleasure-fleets as we see $4/gal looming on the horizon. When we first raised the issue of accelerating fuel-cost in 2002-03 crude oil was around the low-20s per barrel. Now it has gone past $90 while many of us are still mired in the Great Recession. JP MORGAN speculates about $120 by 2011-12. We've got to be prepared for significantly higher liquid energy-cost in whatever area of life and work we can do something about.
      >
      > For March MAIB there will be another design feature.
      >
      >
      > I want to thank the 'keepers' of this Forum and its many steady and casual contributors. In no particular order and addressing you all, I want to thank for instance Bruce Hallman for his efforts to put the 2-D line-art work into more appealing yet visuals, Long for the calender (he sent me one) with beautiful photos not in this archive, Massimo for the stirring video and reports on his IDAHO-project (I linked the YouTube footage to others), and the various authors of key-threads on small and large technical and functional issues along with the many progress-reports and photos on on-going and completed boat-building projects.
      >
      > During the dark year+ after Phil's death, I did and do draw sustenance from quietly reading your discussions. And I know I should have added to them more than I did. But I am still metering my energies for various daily demands restructuring this existence without my love, mentor, co-conspirator, companion. I constantly miss his presence and find myself often in need of 'the other hand' which is no more. So I draw energy and satisfaction from this Forum, major events (for me) such as Seattle and the knowledge that we did together and now I do try to address issues that seemed to us in need of tending, despite at times fiscal and emotional expenditures not agreed to by our CPA or always supportable by our emotional balance.
      >
      > There is one more most serious project here in town that depends on this office for success but should also (at last) result in reasonably serious fiscal returns. I'll will report when it is on solid ground.
      >
      > May this New Year present us all with opportunities and successes, health and balance in our lives, and perhaps a chance to add to the serious and joyful progress in our families and communities.
      >
      > Susanne Altenburger
      > Phil Bolger&Friends, Inc."
      >

      Happy New Year to you, Susanne. Best of luck in the coming year. Your recent article in MAIB, on the Matsue Traveler Study, was a great insight into how a design is developed. Also thought the resulting design would be a great cruiser on any ocean.
      Best wishes, Walter Baron
    • Bruce Hallman
      On Sat, Jan 1, 2011 at 7:30 PM, Susanne@comcast.net ... Best wishes right back at you Susanne! Looking in my mailbox daily for the MAIB AS-34 report. Hmmm,
      Message 2 of 21 , Jan 3, 2011
        On Sat, Jan 1, 2011 at 7:30 PM, Susanne@...
        <philbolger@...> wrote:

        > There is one more most serious project here in town that depends on this office for success but should also (at last) result in reasonably serious fiscal returns.  I'll will report when it is on solid ground.

        Best wishes right back at you Susanne!

        Looking in my mailbox daily for the MAIB AS-34 report.

        Hmmm, intriguing hint at a "most serious project". Guessing now, is
        it a sustainable fisheries boat yard located on Gloucester Harbor?
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... It s relative of course. Being massive, the water stays more or less still. It moves briefly out of the way, and then returns to position, as the hull
        Message 3 of 21 , Jan 3, 2011
          > water flows under the hull, not around the hull.

          It's relative of course. Being massive, the water stays more or less still.

          It moves briefly out of the way, and then returns to position, as the
          hull passes through the water.
        • c.ruzer
          On the other hand if upright and deep bellied, then Bernouli will see the water flow under to the region of higher speed, lower pressure. Therefore note how,
          Message 4 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
            On the other hand if upright and deep bellied, then Bernouli will see the water flow under to the region of higher speed, lower pressure. Therefore note how, for even the light displacement flat-bottomed, sharp-bowed, chined boats eg from CWS through Cj and JB to Jinni, double-ended, flared or plumb sided, in the bodyplan the chine line bisects the angle between bottom and topsides from somewhere around midships, and sometimes thence all the way aft. This is the section of most/all of the swelling displacement in proper trim (as someone earlier noted PCB typically placed COB approx 60% aft...) and so has relatively higher water flow speeds. In proper trim the low bows of these boats are just above the load waterline but gain much clearance with heeling. Nevertheless the boats float/sail mostly on those immersed equally curved sections much further aft. Bernouli still sucks there, but more equally, so helping to minimise cross chine flow. The features are apparent in numerous boats drawn by PCB's mentor, Chapelle. If trimmed bow down, cross chine flow near their flat, sharp bow creates high drag eddies underneath which not only slow, but have the moment to turn the boat and induce added high drag from the compensating rudder. The cross chine flow induced drag at such a bow is much worse in waves as the verticle movement increases the relatve water flow speed amplifying the issue. PCB likened such a bow, any immersed narrow bow, to sailing a wineglass sterned boat flat-out backwards.





            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter" <pvanderwaart@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > > I think Phil realized water flows under the hull.
            >
            > Yes. In the discussion quoted, he is only interested in the flow over the chines. Of course, it's great if the water is neatly divided by the chine, but that can't be arranged all the time. In his view, it was important that the flow be from under the boat to the side as much as possible.
            >
            > Water being incompressible, it's pretty clear that water is going to be pushed to the side, somehow, somewhere.
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.