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Happy New Year and Thanks to You All

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  • Susanne@comcast.net
    Good Morning on this first day of 2011. I wish you all a good year. I would like to thank you for your continuing interest in Phil s and our work. I hope that
    Message 1 of 20 , Jan 1, 2011
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      Good Morning on this first day of 2011.  I wish you all a good year.
       
      I would like to thank you for your continuing interest in Phil's and our work.
      I hope that the re-establishment of the monthly Design-column in MAIB keeps feeding your curiosity and engagement in our thinking on boats, how to use them, and where to build them.  Note this month's feature on the preliminary design of "AS-34". Next month will be an update from the world of fisheries-policy and the working waterfront of Gloucester, essentially a summary of 2 projects of 2010 that I faced myself devoting serious time to, even though I already had an urgent agenda to tend to both in private matters and business, primarily of course securing and enhancing the legacy of Phil Bolger.  One motivating factor in the constructive engagement of these two issues was the further broadening of relative relevance of Phil Bolger's thinking both on local level and in the discourse amongst high-level experts. 

      As Bruce Hallman alerted you to already, Phil Bolger & Friends was invited late February
      '10 to give a presentation at the first international conference on "Energy Use in Fisheries" in Seattle, Nov. 14-17,'10, sponsored by NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration) - a branch of the US government, the WORLD BANK and the UN-FAO (U.N. Fisheries and Agriculture Organization). Experts from 18 nations offered perspectives, with me amongst them (quite unexpectedly).  MAIB will feature my report on it.  It was and remains gratifying indeed to put Phil's and my work into that forum of discussion.  That high-level recognition of the fundamental legitimacy of our perspective should contribute to the likelihood of at last getting craft built and tested across 4-seasons.

      The other project is directly related to the viability of this Port and its working and pleasure-fleets as we see $4/gal looming on the horizon.  When we first raised the issue of accelerating fuel-cost in 2002-03 crude oil was around the low-20s per barrel.  Now it has gone past $90 while many of us are still mired in the Great Recession.  JP MORGAN speculates about $120 by 2011-12.  We've got to be prepared for significantly higher liquid energy-cost in whatever area of life and work we can do something about.

      For March MAIB there will be another design feature.


      I want to thank the 'keepers' of this Forum and its many steady and casual contributors.  In no particular order and addressing you all, I want to thank for instance Bruce Hallman for his efforts to put the 2-D line-art work into more appealing yet visuals, Long for the calender (he sent me one) with beautiful photos not in this archive, Massimo for the stirring video and reports on his IDAHO-project (I linked the YouTube footage to others), and the various authors of key-threads on small and large technical and functional issues along with the many progress-reports and photos on on-going and completed boat-building projects. 

      During the dark year+ after Phil's death, I did and do draw sustenance from quietly reading your discussions.  And I know I should have added to them more than I did.  But I am still metering my energies for various daily demands restructuring this existence without my love, mentor, co-conspirator, companion.  I constantly miss his presence and find myself often in need of 'the other hand' which is no more.  So I draw energy and satisfaction from this Forum, major events (for me) such as Seattle and the knowledge that we did together and now I do try to address issues that seemed to us in need of tending, despite at times fiscal and emotional expenditures not agreed to by our CPA or always supportable by our emotional balance. 

      There is one more most serious project here in town that depends on this office for success but should also (at last) result in reasonably serious fiscal returns.  I'll will report when it is on solid ground.

      May this New Year present us all with opportunities and successes, health and balance in our lives, and perhaps a chance to add to the serious and joyful progress in our families and communities.

      Susanne Altenburger
      Phil Bolger&Friends, Inc. 

       
    • otter55806
      Hi Fred, The short answer is YES! I use the boat on Lake Superior, been to the Apostles many times. Use it on the St Louis; love Pokegama and Kimball bays.
      Message 2 of 20 , Jan 1, 2011
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        Hi Fred,
        The short answer is YES! I use the boat on Lake Superior, been to the Apostles many times. Use it on the St Louis; love Pokegama and Kimball bays. Been to Voyageur's NP From Kab through Namakan into Crane, poking around in nearly all the bays. I did 246 miles in VNP;a place every boater should try to get to as almost all of it is acessible only by boat. No cars! I've been on the St Croix from N of Stillwater at the stopping point down to the Mississippi and S to LaCrosse. Pine Island sound and south into the 10,000 island of the Everglades. Three of the rives in the panhandle around Carrabelle,the St Johns on the E side of Fl, the TX intracoastal from Port Anrasas up to Matagorda. The same area they do the TX 200, but this was Jan and Feb and I some even nastier winds. I wrote about the Fl jaunt, but somehow never got around to writing about the others. That's all on the Bantam, Drifter. Most of my logged mileage is on other boats. This last summer was a write off. Had 12 weeks of Phy T. due to spinal injuries. Read that to mean the damage we all do to ourselfs when young doing things like building boats:)First time since I built my first boat in 1971 I didn't get on the water in one of my own boats. Next summer awaits. Contact me when coming through next summer!
        Bob

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Fred Schumacher <fredschum@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Fri, Dec 31, 2010 at 1:07 PM, otter55806 <otter55806@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > Hey Chester,
        > > Glad to read about you and EstherMae! To refresh your memory, you let me
        > > park my van and boat trailer at your place while I was off on Drifter, my
        > > Bolger Bantam. How I wish I was there now. We had freezing rain here in
        > > Duluth last night.
        > >
        >
        > Bob,
        >
        > Do you use your Bantam on Lake Superior, or in the bay, or any of the lakes
        > up north, like Vermilion or Kabetogama? I'm stuck in the Cities now but I'd
        > love to see your boat when I head back to the Orr area during summer.
        >
        > fred s.
        >
      • sirdarnell
        Peter you need approval to join. In any case, open celled foams can be saturated with water and sink (might take a long time.) Closed cell foams have gas
        Message 3 of 20 , Jan 2, 2011
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          Peter you need approval to join.

          In any case, open celled foams can be saturated with water and sink (might take a long time.)

          Closed cell foams have gas bubbles that can not be saturated with water, the areas between the gas bubbles can be, but because of the gas bubbles closed celled foams as a rule will not sink and thus make a better choice for flotation.

          David

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter" <pvanderwaart@...> wrote:
          >
          > > What you want is one of the Urethane foams, not XPS.
          > > XPS is and open cell foam (eXtruded PolyStyrene.)
          >
          > There was an article long ago in Small Boat Journal about using an expensive foam to build a dinghy. It was an amateur project, and the design is clunky, but it may be instructive. The files are here:
          >
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/boatdesign/files/Dingbat/
          >
          > I don't think you have to join the group to see them. Joining isn't a problem in any case.
          >
          > There as a fad for this sort of construction back in the 1970s or thereabouts. It didn't catch on for amateurs. I think the problems of getting a fair surface outweigh any benefits.
          >
          > If the idea is to build a boat from fiberglass without plywood, another idea is to lay up glass panels on "table." The table would basically be a piece of thick ply with a laminate top, like a big piece of kitchen counter. You can lay up glass to the desired size, and the side next to table will be smooth as glass. Multihull designers Richard Woods and Derek Kelsall have built boats that way.
          >
          > A problem common to a lot of strong materials is that a panel that is strong enough is not stiff enough. Pure glass panels would require different framing than ply which is stiffer for its strength.
          >
          > Peter
          >
        • Peter
          ... I m the moderator, and I can promise approval will be coming within a day. I ll also see about posting elsewhere.
          Message 4 of 20 , Jan 2, 2011
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            > Peter you need approval to join.
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/boatdesign/files/Dingbat/

            I'm the moderator, and I can promise approval will be coming within a day. I'll also see about posting elsewhere.
          • KK7B
            I designed and built 3 different hollow windsurfing boards using 1/2 blue foam with an epoxy-glass skin about 15 years ago. Started with internal frames like
            Message 5 of 20 , Jan 4, 2011
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              I designed and built 3 different hollow windsurfing boards using 1/2" blue foam with an epoxy-glass skin about 15 years ago. Started with internal frames like an airplane wing, then with plank-on frame, then faired with 100 grit sandpaper, and finally a single layer of 4 oz glass and a sanding coat with West 410 microlight filler. They were beautiful, light (12lbs), strong, and fast. I logged hundreds of hours in big conditions on Lake Superior and in the Columbia Gorge.

              They were prettier than production boards by Mistral and F2 when new, but they didn't age well. Delamination between the glass skin and blue foam, despite 3 years of experiments to prevent it, resulted in big unsightly bubbles in the skin. Later production sailboards eliminated the deck seams, look as good as my custom designs, and last longer.

              My hollow sailboards were not nearly as strong as my Bolger-Payson instant boat construction with 1/4" plywood and a glass skin, but at a fraction of the weight. Because of the potential for gorgeous faired curves with no visible lines between planks, they invite a lot of hours of labor. I considered it time well spent--but that's a lot more work than instant boat construction using plywood.

              Thanks for the interesting question, and I sure thought about it a lot--but not so much after I failed to solve the delamination problem. I've never had glass-epoxy cloth delaminate from plywood.

              Best Regards,

              Rick

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher C. Wetherill" <wetherillc@...> wrote:
              >
              > All this discussion has brought to mind an old question I have been
              > pondering. Has anyone built an Instant Boat from 1/2" pink board with
              > fiberglass on both sides? Issues I have been considering
              > 1) easier to work than plywood
              > 2) slightly less costly than plywood
              > 3) not as stiff
              > 4) possibly lighter than plywood.
              >
              > I suspect that the need to glass both sides will result in no savings of
              > cost or weight.
              >
              > Chris
              >
            • c.ruzer
              Chris, by how much does the pink board deform under various loads? How soft or squmbly (tech term) is it? It doesn t have to be as stiff, tough, and etc as
              Message 6 of 20 , Jan 4, 2011
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                Chris, by how much does the pink board deform under various loads? How soft or squmbly (tech term) is it? It doesn't have to be as stiff, tough, and etc as plywood. For an instant boat you may need to add some panel curvature by adding some arc to bulkheads or frames, or just make the foam layer thicker. Use less expensive polyester resin and glass for same to lower the cost. Probably overall similar/lower cost than a plywood boat from better stuff. I don't think you'd need any complicated set up for an instant boat (molds, plugs, etc). Cut the foam panels, hot glue tack them together, round angles off and fillet as the spirit moves, apply glass.

                Thinks.. asks.. doesn't Dave Gray knock PDRs (family Brickoboatean) out of foam sandwich to good effect?

                Another example, not instant though a Bolger: DOLPHIN #259, surf pulling boat for 4 oars, load waterline from 660lb to 1200lb, 17lb lead ballast in the sailing version centreboard, keel, thwarts, breasthooks, knees, posts, hefty bouyancy FOAM SUPPORT to LARGE stern and fore sheets, 21" amidships keel to gunwhale height, 18'x 4' overall, 0.5" strip plank build, ought to weigh what do you think empty? 250 to 300lbs?

                What's that? Heavier?

                Well then, try only 100lb got out of 3/8" foam sandwich:

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger5/photos/album/837076775/pic/list

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/48541





                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher C. Wetherill" <wetherillc@...> wrote:
                >
                > All this discussion has brought to mind an old question I have been
                > pondering. Has anyone built an Instant Boat from 1/2" pink board with
                > fiberglass on both sides? Issues I have been considering
                > 1) easier to work than plywood
                > 2) slightly less costly than plywood
                > 3) not as stiff
                > 4) possibly lighter than plywood.
                >
                > I suspect that the need to glass both sides will result in no savings of
                > cost or weight.
                >
                > Chris
                >
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