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Thai long tail

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  • Pat
    Perhaps a look at some of the engines we use in Thailand. All are engines are modified tuck or car engines or general purpose motors with a longtail shaft,
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 26, 2010
    Perhaps a look at some of the engines we use in Thailand. All are  engines are modified tuck or car engines or general purpose motors  with a longtail shaft, and air cooled mounted on the transom see pic.
     
    Cheers
    PAT 
  • Catherine
    It s hard to tell from the two photos Pat sent exactly what a longtail is. Three years ago my wife and I took a cruise down the Siem Reap River in Cambodia on
    Message 2 of 5 , Nov 27, 2010
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      It's hard to tell from the two photos Pat sent exactly what a longtail is. Three years ago my wife and I took a cruise down the Siem Reap River in Cambodia on a considerably larger boat with a wide transom, on which was perched an automobile engine with a long shaft, about 12 feet long, an extension of the crankshaft angling down into the water. The whole rig pivoted just forward of the transom, and was controlled by guy wires to the deck corners at the transom. The boat was steered that way, like a giant outboard motor. We passed several similar boats on the way down to Siem Reap Lake and back, all tourist craft. -- Will White

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Pat <patjah@...> wrote:
      >
      > Perhaps a look at some of the engines we use in Thailand. All are engines
      > are modified tuck or car engines or general purpose motors with a longtail
      > shaft, and air cooled mounted on the transom see pic.
      >
      > Cheers
      > PAT
      >
    • Michael Kline
      I have experience with both the Thai and US approaches. The Thai versions are typically larger and more powerful than the US versions and are used for general
      Message 3 of 5 , Nov 28, 2010
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        I have experience with both the Thai and US approaches. 
         
        The Thai versions are typically larger and more powerful than the US versions and are used for general river propulsion. 
         
        In the United States, these engines are typically popular among outdoorsmen who frequent shallow and debris filled waters.
        The American ones are smaller and more specialized, as are the boats designed for the same conditions.  I like them for their relative simplicity and light weight when compared to US and Japanese outboards.  The fact that they are air-cooled instead of water-cooled reduces maintenance issues in silt-filled or salt water.  Normally they are built with a skeg that raises the prop over debris or shallow bars, and being able to raise the prop out of the water means that you can shake off weeds collected around the lower end.
         
        These features and ease of maintenance makes up for the noise (they all could use better mufflers) and the fact that they have no reverse gear.
         
        I offer the following references for those who would like to explore this technology.
         
         
         
        Mike Kline
         
         
      • ANDREW AIREY
        The Dutch used a similar system when they were first motorising sailing barges about a hundred years ago i.e motor on the foredeck and prop on a long shaft
        Message 4 of 5 , Nov 29, 2010
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          The Dutch used a similar system when they were first motorising sailing barges about a hundred years ago i.e motor on the foredeck and prop on a long shaft alongside.Popularly known as wifekillers.I take it the modern ones are a bit safer
          cheers
          Andy Airey
        • Mark Hamill
          I have a long-tail unit that I use with a 5 hp Briggs and Stratton. I have used it on a Y stern freighter canoe in really shallow and murky rivers and can go
          Message 5 of 5 , Nov 29, 2010
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            I have a long-tail unit that I use with a 5 hp Briggs and Stratton. I have used it on a "Y" stern freighter canoe in really shallow and murky rivers and can go places a jet boat cannot. The height of the transom is important as one cannot exceed the maximum lubrication operating angle of the engine. In a canoe you need weight or a person in the bow to balance and stabilize. The tail is held onto the engine adapter by a friction fitting. The prop is pretty exposed and requires your though and attention--the prop guards really seem to create terrible drag and I took mine off soon after using it. I can probably find pictures if interested.
             
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