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Re: Safety of ballasted vs. unballasted open boats/BBA

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  • David Jost
    Hi, my name is David and I am a boatbuilder. I have not had a boatbuilding moment for over 3 hours now, and hope to make it through the morning without getting
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 2, 2000
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      Hi, my name is David and I am a boatbuilder.
      I have not had a boatbuilding moment for over 3 hours now, and hope
      to
      make it through the morning without getting the cold
      sweat.(reminiscent of my J24 days, oops , that was my cold
      underwear!)

      My micro will be self-righting with her newly poured keel! It is
      easy
      to rig, and will self- steer. I am planning on putting in enough
      floatation to make her comfortable to sit in if an untimely wave
      comes aboard.

      if I add a wonderful Triad trailer with an extendable tongue to the
      gear, it will be very easy to launch and trail. I once had a Rhodes
      22 with a Triad trailer. The trailer was the best part of the boat.

      David Jost
      "always carry a roll of duct tape"

      --- In bolger@egroups.com, Stan Muller <smuller@i...> wrote:


      > Hi Ralph,
      > I'm Stan, and I am a boat builder. I've been away from the boat
      for
      > eleven days, seventeen hours and six minutes. Now that I know that
      I
      can
      > quit any time I want to, I am going to start painting the hull.
      That's
      > not building, it's painting! I don't care what you say, I can quit
      if I
      > wanted to! I don't even think about not having worked on the boat
      for
      > eleven days, seventeen hours, and ten minutes. I'm not even thinking
      > about fiber glassing the cockpit seats. I'm free of it, FREE, it
      don't
      > bother me a bit!!!!
      > PS; did I mention, the Micro IS self righting!
      > Stan, Snow Goose, who hasn't even thought about boat building for
      eleven
      > days, seventeen hours, and thirteen minutes.
    • Vance Cowan
      When I saw the file pictures of David s Micro hull sitting in his yard this question occurred to me, but the answer was self evident. Q. How much unmown grass
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 2, 2000
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        When I saw the file pictures of David's Micro hull sitting in his
        yard this question occurred to me, but the answer was self
        evident.

        Q. How much unmown grass does a Micro hull displace?

        A. All of it.

        Vance
      • David Jost
        Ouch! I will have you know that that grass is freshly mown, and all of the dog messes were picked up prior to that picture being taken. My approach to yard
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 3, 2000
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          Ouch!
          I will have you know that that grass is freshly mown, and all of the
          dog messes were picked up prior to that picture being taken. My
          approach to yard maintenance is quite old fashioned. One lets the
          grass grow long to encourage deep root structure, we then let it
          burn
          out in July when the summer drought occurs. The grubs then starve
          themselves to death, the birds come and eat the grubs, then the lawn
          grows back in August. ooooo off topic!
          I have been trying for 2 weeks to get my second layer in place
          on
          the bottom, but the weather has prohibited it. The keel looks great,
          if you live in the Northeast, it is worth the time to have I.M.
          Broomfield in Providence RI cast the keel. I picked up extra lead to
          stuff in the stern keel opening and bow opening while the keel is
          being put in. This will bring the weight within 11 lbs of Bolger's
          plan. Any additional ballast will be added after undert the
          floorboards after she is launched.
          I did not purchase enough plywood and need to get one more
          sheet
          of 1/4" for the keel sheething. I forgot that I was going with 3/8"
          for the deck and cockpit, and I do not want the sheething at this
          thickness (my racing roots will not let me build a keel wider than
          planned, it is poor form) as the pintles and gudgeons (bronze) I
          have
          secured will not fit.
          Sorry, I have to go mow the lawn now. Maybe i will just
          park
          my boats all over it!

          David Jost
          "not building today. due to more rain"
          --- In bolger@egroups.com, "Vance Cowan" <vcgraphics@t...> wrote:
          > When I saw the file pictures of David's Micro hull sitting in his
          > yard this question occurred to me, but the answer was self
          > evident.
          >
          > Q. How much unmown grass does a Micro hull displace?
          >
          > A. All of it.
          >
          > Vance
        • darus@visi.com
          Isn t this group more like Boat Builders Unanimous ?
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 3, 2000
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            Isn't this group more like "Boat Builders Unanimous"?

            > Ralph, I'd say you've found it, but it won't cure your problem!
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Ralph Wight [mailto:UncleRalph@...]
            > Sent: Wednesday, August 02, 2000 2:16 PM
            > To: bolger@egroups.com
            > Subject: [bolger] Re: Safety of ballasted vs. unballasted open boats
            >
            >
            >
            > Ralph Wight (looking for a Boat Builders Anonymous group)
            >
            >
          • Lincoln Ross
            ... what about 5200? Doesn t moisture hasten cure?
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 3, 2000
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              --- In bolger@egroups.com, "David Jost" <djost@m...> wrote:
              > Ouch!
              > snip
              > I have been trying for 2 weeks to get my second layer in place
              > on
              > the bottom, but the weather has prohibited it.
              what about 5200? Doesn't moisture hasten cure?
            • David Jost
              Lincoln, I was tempted to try something like this, but I do not want to seal in moisture as rot my get promoted prematurely that way. Tomorrow looks like a
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 3, 2000
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                Lincoln,
                I was tempted to try something like this, but I do not want to
                seal in moisture as rot my get promoted prematurely that way.
                Tomorrow looks like a good day for glueing as well as Saturday.
                As much as I have an affinity for 5200 for some things, I do not
                think that glueing two panels of plywood together is the best
                application for it. This would get to be really expensive to spread,
                extremely sticky, and I feel that epoxy is a better choice for the
                application. I already have 2 gallons or resin and hardner in the shed
                for the purpose, but will not use it in this rain and humidity.
                I like to use 5200 to bond seams that will never have to come
                apart again. For all other seams I use polysulphide so that things
                can get dismantled. BTW pl premium works pretty good as a permanent
                sealant as well. I bonded my toe rails back on the old leaky
                Enterprise. No ill effects yet, they seem fairly watertight.


                > > I have been trying for 2 weeks to get my second layer in
                place
                > > on
                > > the bottom, but the weather has prohibited it.
                > what about 5200? Doesn't moisture hasten cure?
              • Jim Chamberlin RCSIS
                You re right, it does cure faster in a humid climate. Jim
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 6, 2000
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                  You're right, it does cure faster in a humid climate.
                  Jim
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Lincoln Ross [mailto:lincolnr@...]
                  > Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2000 9:08 AM
                  > To: bolger@egroups.com
                  > Subject: [bolger] Re: Micro displacement/not a problem.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In bolger@egroups.com, "David Jost" <djost@m...> wrote:
                  > > Ouch!
                  > > snip
                  > > I have been trying for 2 weeks to get my second layer in place
                  > > on
                  > > the bottom, but the weather has prohibited it.
                  > what about 5200? Doesn't moisture hasten cure?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Bolger rules!!!
                  > - no cursing
                  > - stay on topic
                  > - use punctuation
                  > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
                  > - add some content: send "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
                  >
                • wmrpage@aol.com
                  In a message dated 8/7/00 6:13:17 PM Central Daylight Time, sanmi@channelpoint.com writes:
                  Message 8 of 13 , Aug 7, 2000
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                    In a message dated 8/7/00 6:13:17 PM Central Daylight Time,
                    sanmi@... writes:

                    << In my opinion, the rig contributes most to a boat's seaworthiness,
                    sail shortening effectiveness being the most important. >>

                    IMHO, being able to shorten sail, while still having enough propulsion for
                    control is a terrific virtue, and one to rarely found in production or
                    chartered boats. For all the virtues that Bolger claims for the sprit-sharpie
                    rig, I've never seen a very convincing demonstration of how one reefs such a
                    rig when one has realized the need (almost invariably too late, alas) do so.
                    Mast-head sloops, with standing rigging have a number of vices, but
                    slab-reefing of the mains have great virtues!

                    Bill in MN
                  • Frank San Miguel
                    I happen to have just finished a 15 sprit boomed sharpie skiff, and I sewed two horizontal rows of reef points in the sail. I haven t had to reef yet, only
                    Message 9 of 13 , Aug 7, 2000
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                      I happen to have just finished a 15' sprit boomed sharpie skiff, and
                      I sewed two horizontal rows of reef points in the sail. I haven't
                      had to reef yet, only tried it on the trailer - but it seems that the
                      reefing proceedure isn't too bad. It is a little more clumsy than
                      with the Drascombe, which has a loose footed main with lace reef
                      points. Slab jiffy reefing is way easier to operate, but on the
                      other hand, it has more moving parts to fail.

                      We'll see how it works out in practice.

                      Frank

                      --- In bolger@egroups.com, wmrpage@a... wrote:
                      > In a message dated 8/7/00 6:13:17 PM Central Daylight Time,
                      > sanmi@c... writes:
                      >
                      > << In my opinion, the rig contributes most to a boat's
                      seaworthiness,
                      > sail shortening effectiveness being the most important. >>
                      >
                      > IMHO, being able to shorten sail, while still having enough
                      propulsion for
                      > control is a terrific virtue, and one to rarely found in production
                      or
                      > chartered boats. For all the virtues that Bolger claims for the
                      sprit-sharpie
                      > rig, I've never seen a very convincing demonstration of how one
                      reefs such a
                      > rig when one has realized the need (almost invariably too late,
                      alas) do so.
                      > Mast-head sloops, with standing rigging have a number of vices,
                      but
                      > slab-reefing of the mains have great virtues!
                      >
                      > Bill in MN
                    • hwal@aol.com
                      In a message dated 8/7/2000 7:13:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time, sanmi@channelpoint.com writes:
                      Message 10 of 13 , Aug 8, 2000
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                        In a message dated 8/7/2000 7:13:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                        sanmi@... writes:

                        << I sailed a completely open boat, a 21' Drascombe Longboat, for 20
                        years and I would rather weather a gale on her than on most 30
                        footers that I know of.
                        >>

                        I too have an open boat - which to date - I have felt more comfortable in in
                        any weather than any other boat - and that's my sea pearl 21. I've been in
                        some real nasty conditions in our pearl - she has a beautifully flaired hull
                        which does well in rough water. And I doubt there is any boat anywhere which
                        is as easy to reef - She's a cat ketch and the sails reef by rolling them
                        around the masts - which turn in place. She also has over 400 lbs of water
                        ballast. The other advantage to a ketch ( also a yawl) - if conditions are
                        real bad - you can set the mizzen - furl the main and ride it out like a
                        duck. I think there are some similarities between the drascomb and the sp.
                        Steve Anderson
                      • edward haile
                        Bill in MN, As for reefing a sprit-boom rig, on my Martha Jane I remove the sprit, wrap the sail twice (or three times, I forget) around the mizzenmast and I
                        Message 11 of 13 , Aug 8, 2000
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                          Bill in MN,

                          As for reefing a sprit-boom rig, on my Martha Jane I remove the sprit, wrap
                          the sail twice (or three times, I forget) around the mizzenmast and I have a
                          nice sheet angle for loose-footed. On a mainsail, there's nothing to prevent
                          a moveable mainsheet cleat so you can adjust for any number of wraps.

                          ED HAILE


                          >From: wmrpage@...
                          >Reply-To: bolger@egroups.com
                          >To: bolger@egroups.com
                          >Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Safety of ballasted vs. unballasted open boats
                          >Date: Mon, 7 Aug 2000 23:31:02 EDT
                          >
                          >In a message dated 8/7/00 6:13:17 PM Central Daylight Time,
                          >sanmi@... writes:
                          >
                          ><< In my opinion, the rig contributes most to a boat's seaworthiness,
                          > sail shortening effectiveness being the most important. >>
                          >
                          >IMHO, being able to shorten sail, while still having enough propulsion for
                          >control is a terrific virtue, and one to rarely found in production or
                          >chartered boats. For all the virtues that Bolger claims for the
                          >sprit-sharpie
                          >rig, I've never seen a very convincing demonstration of how one reefs such
                          >a
                          >rig when one has realized the need (almost invariably too late, alas) do
                          >so.
                          >Mast-head sloops, with standing rigging have a number of vices, but
                          >slab-reefing of the mains have great virtues!
                          >
                          >Bill in MN

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