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Re: [bolger] Safety of ballasted vs. unballasted open boats

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  • Jeff Gilbert
    Id like to be in a Chebaco, with a few small, carefully placed water-ballast tanks built in. (And wearing an anti-design-altering flame suit) Jeff
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1 9:18 AM
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      Id like to be in a Chebaco, with a few small, carefully placed water-ballast
      tanks built in.
      (And wearing an anti-design-altering flame suit)
      Jeff

      >which would
      >you rather be in - an unballasted Chebacco or a ballasted Romilly?
    • wmrpage@aol.com
      In a message dated 8/1/00 2:37:24 PM Central Daylight Time, UncleRalph@aol.com writes:
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 5 12:56 PM
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        In a message dated 8/1/00 2:37:24 PM Central Daylight Time,
        UncleRalph@... writes:

        << which would
        you rather be in - an unballasted Chebacco or a ballasted Romilly?
        >>
        IMHO - I'd rather be in a boat that floats! This advice from someone who
        managed to sink a "Bolgeresque" boat in 3' of water not 2 miles for Port
        Everglades (or whatever) with two elderly gentlemen aboard and ended up
        seriously worried about the likelihood that hypothermia would be a problem.

        Bill in MN
      • Frank San Miguel
        at the risk of beating a dead horse,... I sailed a completely open boat, a 21 Drascombe Longboat, for 20 years and I would rather weather a gale on her than
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 7 3:27 PM
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          at the risk of beating a dead horse,...

          I sailed a completely open boat, a 21' Drascombe Longboat, for 20
          years and I would rather weather a gale on her than on most 30
          footers that I know of.

          She draws 1', is lightly ballasted in the form of a galvanized steel
          centerboard and has positive flotation in the form of foam laced
          under the seats, but it is her rig that sets her apart. I've never
          had to test her floatation even though I've sailed her through storms
          in the Chesapeake with a double reefed main and furled jib and mizzen
          eating a peanut butter sandwich while most of the big guys scurried
          in to harbor (and done other stupid things besides).

          In my opinion, the rig contributes most to a boat's seaworthiness,
          sail shortening effectiveness being the most important. Next comes
          ballast & hull shape. To contrast, I also sailed a Rhodes 19 with a
          deep bulb keel when I was growing up, but the shallow, light,
          centerboard Drascombe (21' ft) was easily 10 times more able in a
          storm.

          Frank San Miguel
          Monument, CO
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