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bobcat--advice? plans?

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  • Sam Glasscock
    I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had been abandoned.  The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think) inside and
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 21, 2010
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      I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had been abandoned.  The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think) inside and out, and is sound.  The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck.  The seat and coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and transom.  The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will have to be replaced.  I have always admired the look of these little cats.  Are they decent sailors?  Does anyone have a set of plans they might want to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard trunk and the other pieces that have to come out.  Thanks, Sam 

    • Jack Niewoehner
      Hi Sam, Go to www.instantboats.com and buy the book Build the Instant Catboat. I built my Bobcat from this book, and it has all the information you will need.
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 23, 2010
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        Hi Sam,

        Go to www.instantboats.com and buy the book Build the Instant Catboat.  I built my Bobcat from this book, and it has all the information you will need.  I haven't actually finished my boat yet, so I can't comment on the sailing qualities, but I've heard nothing but good things about it.

        Jack

        On Sat, Aug 21, 2010 at 9:14 PM, Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@...> wrote:
         

        I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had been abandoned.  The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think) inside and out, and is sound.  The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck.  The seat and coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and transom.  The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will have to be replaced.  I have always admired the look of these little cats.  Are they decent sailors?  Does anyone have a set of plans they might want to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard trunk and the other pieces that have to come out.  Thanks, Sam 


      • prairiedog2332
        I might consider just building a completely new hull and salvage what is usable from the gift version. You may find that when replacing the centerboard trunk
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 23, 2010
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          I might consider just building a completely new hull and salvage what is
          usable from the gift version. You may find that when replacing the
          centerboard trunk and transom you will discover hidden rot in the
          interface between them and the hull.

          That happened to me one time...

          Nels

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Jack Niewoehner <jack.ne1r@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Sam,
          >
          > Go to www.instantboats.com and buy the book Build the Instant Catboat.
          I
          > built my Bobcat from this book, and it has all the information you
          will
          > need. I haven't actually finished my boat yet, so I can't comment on
          the
          > sailing qualities, but I've heard nothing but good things about it.
          >
          > Jack
          >
          > On Sat, Aug 21, 2010 at 9:14 PM, Sam Glasscock
          > glasscocklanding@...wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it
          had
          > > been abandoned. The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I
          think)
          > > inside and out, and is sound. The bow deck/side decks are sheathed,
          and are
          > > sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck. The seat
          and
          > > coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the
          rudder and
          > > transom. The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like
          it will
          > > have to be replaced. I have always admired the look of these little
          cats.
          > > Are they decent sailors? Does anyone have a set of plans they
          might want
          > > to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the
          centerboard
          > > trunk and the other pieces that have to come out. Thanks, Sam
          > >
          > >
          >
        • robertchamberland
          Hi Sam, I have plans and the book that you can have if you decide to go ahead with your project. My Bobcat was a joy to sail. I wouldn t build a new hull. The
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 23, 2010
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            Hi Sam, I have plans and the book that you can have if you decide to go ahead with your project.

            My Bobcat was a joy to sail. I wouldn't build a new hull. The most expensive parts of building Bobcat are the plywood panels for the hull and the sail. Most everything else is available from Home Depot and you can pick over what they have.Installing a new centerboard case would be project but if the boat was built according to the plans it wouldn't require destroying the hull. The deck repair would be easy enough. The seat and coamings are not problem. By the way the seat is not really a seat. Most of the time you would be on the "floor" because of the tiller arrangement. Did you get all the spars too?. They are easily made if you didn't and cheap enough. I used hemfir sticks from Home Depot and picked them over for the fir. If the transom isn't rotten you might consider just grinding off all the paint and epoxying a doorskin panel over the whole thing. A repair might be easier than replacement. I'm off boats now so I only have the plans for nostalgia-your welcome to them.
            Bob

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@...> wrote:
            >
            > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had been abandoned.  The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think) inside and out, and is sound.  The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck.  The seat and coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and transom.  The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will have to be replaced.  I have always admired the look of these little cats.  Are they decent sailors?  Does anyone have a set of plans they might want to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard trunk and the other pieces that have to come out.  Thanks, Sam 
            >
          • dkp390
            Bobcat sailing.  Yahoo groups Bolger post reply I noticed that most responses to your post were regarding the rebuild so let me add what I can about sailing
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 27, 2010
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              Bobcat sailing.  Yahoo groups Bolger post reply

              I noticed that most responses to your post were regarding the rebuild so let me add what I can about sailing the Bolger Bobcat. It does feel like a larger boat under sail and with two sets of reef points can be adjusted well to a great variety of weather conditions. Almost always, I sit on the floor and do not find the need to hike out by sitting on the side deck, in fact I never have at all. Most of the characteristics of traditional catboats do apply and there are a great many little tricks such as using centerboard adjustment to maintain good helm balance. There is an article called "The catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association (http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you will want to know about and experiment with. And just in case you want way more information try this link (http://www.tropicalboating.com/imagestr/CatboatSailingManual.pdf) What I like most is that it can be very simple to sail yet also have many subtile qualities and complexities to master to sail well. It feels stable and tends to heal over just so far then firm up in gusts or rounds up into the wind in strong gusts. It responds well to sheet and tiller inputs. The rudder design with endplate keeps steady helm pressure as the boat heels. Traditional rigging and character make it a fun small daysailer, a disadvantage though it that it takes a bit longer to setup and rig.

                  

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@...> wrote:
              >
              > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had been abandoned.  The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think) inside and out, and is sound.  The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck.  The seat and coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and transom.  The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will have to be replaced.  I have always admired the look of these little cats.  Are they decent sailors?  Does anyone have a set of plans they might want to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard trunk and the other pieces that have to come out.  Thanks, Sam 
              >
            • Jay Bazuzi
              Traditional rigging and character make it a fun small daysailer, a disadvantage though it that it takes a bit longer to setup and rig. It takes me a while to
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 28, 2010
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                "Traditional rigging and character make it a fun small daysailer, a disadvantage though it that it takes a bit longer to setup and rig."

                It takes me a while to prep the boat before I leave the house, then rig at the boat ramp, then launch, then park, then raise sail & cast off.  The other day I watched someone launch a plywood sailing dory in 5 minutes. I was very jealous!

                But the Bobcat is beautiful and nicely stable. I have 2 sets of reef points, but I doubt I'll ever use them.

                The most difficult bit of sailing is taking in light wind, in small spaces. If you sheet in at all before the tack is done, she'll turn back to weather, and you can't fight it with the tiller because you lack steerageway. Attempting to do so just slows the boat down even more.  The trick is to apply the tiller gently, sheet out as you tack, turn further than you might think, sheet in, gain speed, then steer to balance.

                -J





                On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 7:38 AM, dkp390 <dkp390@...> wrote:
                 



                Bobcat sailing.  Yahoo groups Bolger post reply

                I noticed that most responses to your post were regarding the rebuild so let me add what I can about sailing the Bolger Bobcat. It does feel like a larger boat under sail and with two sets of reef points can be adjusted well to a great variety of weather conditions. Almost always, I sit on the floor and do not find the need to hike out by sitting on the side deck, in fact I never have at all. Most of the characteristics of traditional catboats do apply and there are a great many little tricks such as using centerboard adjustment to maintain good helm balance. There is an article called "The catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association (http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you will want to know about and experiment with. And just in case you want way more information try this link (http://www.tropicalboating.com/imagestr/CatboatSailingManual.pdf) What I like most is that it can be very simple to sail yet also have many subtile qualities and complexities to master to sail well. It feels stable and tends to heal over just so far then firm up in gusts or rounds up into the wind in strong gusts. It responds well to sheet and tiller inputs. The rudder design with endplate keeps steady helm pressure as the boat heels. Traditional rigging and character make it a fun small daysailer, a disadvantage though it that it takes a bit longer to setup and rig.



                    

                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@...> wrote:
                >
                > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had been abandoned.  The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think) inside and out, and is sound.  The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck.  The seat and coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and transom.  The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will have to be replaced.  I have always admired the look of these little cats.  Are they decent sailors?  Does anyone have a set of plans they might want to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard trunk and the other pieces that have to come out.  Thanks, Sam 
                >


              • dkp390
                Boat ideas: I took out the sailboat For the first time in over a year yesterday and that got me thinking of improvements again.  As usual I did ignore the
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 29, 2010
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                  Boat ideas:

                  I took out the sailboat For the first time in over a year yesterday and that got me thinking of improvements again.  As usual I did ignore the launch checklist created and even used the first few times. Why not use and update it each time? It might even remind me to check trailer tire pressure. All did go quite well though, no major items forgotten, no embarrassment, damage or do-overs worth mention. 

                  Something I did notice was how much work it is to get out on the water trailering for a day sail.  How nice it would be to be able to leave it in the water and mostly ready to go, I could imagine setting up once a year then at each sail remove sail cover hoist halyards and sail away.  The advantage of indoor storage, infrequent use and distance from lakes in the area make trailering a necessity for me though. So I'm thinking of ways to simplify the process. The boat is a Bolger Bobcat 12' 6" gaff rigged catboat. It has no standing rigging but has mainsheet, throat and peak halyards, topping lift, lazy jacks and uses individual sail ties along the gaff and boom. The mast is carried along the side of her on the trailer and needs to be stepped each time so a mast tabernacle can be a possible future improvement. 

                  What I thought of doing first is to find a way to transport with the sail bent onto the spars which would require a tight fitting cover to protect the sail while holding both gaff and boom. With this method it may also be better to carry in the boat rather than alongside on the trailer. My current way of attaching the luff to the mast uses rope cringles looped through grommets in the sail that must be slid up the mast as it is stepped. This will not work well with spars in the way while stepping the mast so I may need to leave them on like mast hoops and lash, toggle or snap shackle the sail to them. Being able to keep the halyards and other rigging on the mast would also simplify setup, but require another cover to protect and organize the lines while towing. It normally takes almost an hour to get everything ready but with these few changes I hope to reduce that by half.

                  Another potential efficiency improvement would be better gear storage onboard. I also found myself moving loads of stuff form the boat to the tow vehicle at home, then back at launching; reverse and repeat again for hauling out and returning home. With gear properly stowed in and lashed to the boat it could be left there while on the road. First here should be attachments for the floorboards, oars and ground tackle. Then gear tie-downs for items stowed forward under the deck and a cover for the storage space aft.   

                  Reefing control lines would also be a sensible improvement. It was windy while setting up so I tied in a reef before launching, but it would be difficult underway when needed most, and I even had a bit of trouble just shaking it out as the wind faded. The problem is that it is hard to reach the aft end of the boom and the sail fills as I hold onto it while tying or untying the individual reef ties. I see this additional rigging as a valuable use of setup time saved elsewhere. I will also use a proper reef knot with a loop in it on the reefpoint sail ties, rather than a square knot, to make it easy to undo.          

                  Most of these ideas are functional improvements but I also want to keep my boat looking good.  Paint and varnish; that's another story though. Most areas got primer and only one coat without annual repainting. The sand used as non-slip surface on deck is too rough, so it needs additional coats of paint. A minimum number of varnish coats were used on brightwork where for best results more is best.

                  To help organize and prioritize all this work,  I think it best to take a trip to the lake for another afternoon sail or two.  

                                               

                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Jay Bazuzi <jay@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > It takes me a while to prep the boat before I leave the house, then rig at
                  > the boat ramp, then launch, then park, then raise sail & cast off.
                  > -J
                  >
                  >
                  > On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 7:38 AM, dkp390 <dkp390@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >There is an article called "The
                  > > catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association (
                  > > http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you will
                  > > want to know about and experiment with.
                  > > strong gusts. It responds well to
                  > >
                  > > <glasscocklanding@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had
                  > > been abandoned. The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think)
                  > > inside and out, and is sound. The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are
                  > > sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck. The seat and
                  > > coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and
                  > > transom. The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will
                  > > have to be replaced. I have always admired the look of these little cats.
                  > > Are they decent sailors? Does anyone have a set of plans they might want
                  > > to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard
                  > > trunk and the other pieces that have to come out. Thanks, Sam
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                • robertchamberland
                  I kept the sail permanently on the spars also all the halliards and sheets. I made a long bag that everything would fit in. I also had a bag for the mast. When
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 30, 2010
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                    I kept the sail permanently on the spars also all the halliards and sheets. I made a long bag that everything would fit in. I also had a bag for the mast. When launching I rove all the halliards, set the boom and gaff on the boat with all the hoops lined up over the HOLE and kept them in line with a 4" piece of PVC then raised the mast and dropped it down the hole. It helps to have someone hold this assembly so it doesn't roll off the boat. I sometimes got the halliards lined up wrong but it was still a quick enough process. I'll post a picture if I can figure how.
                    Bob Chamberland


                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dkp390" <dkp390@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Boat ideas:
                    >
                    > I took out the sailboat For the first time in over a year yesterday and that got me thinking of improvements again.  As usual I did ignore the launch checklist created and even used the first few times. Why not use and update it each time? It might even remind me to check trailer tire pressure. All did go quite well though, no major items forgotten, no embarrassment, damage or do-overs worth mention. 
                    >
                    > Something I did notice was how much work it is to get out on the water trailering for a day sail.  How nice it would be to be able to leave it in the water and mostly ready to go, I could imagine setting up once a year then at each sail remove sail cover hoist halyards and sail away.  The advantage of indoor storage, infrequent use and distance from lakes in the area make trailering a necessity for me though. So I'm thinking of ways to simplify the process. The boat is a Bolger Bobcat 12' 6" gaff rigged catboat. It has no standing rigging but has mainsheet, throat and peak halyards, topping lift, lazy jacks and uses individual sail ties along the gaff and boom. The mast is carried along the side of her on the trailer and needs to be stepped each time so a mast tabernacle can be a possible future improvement. 
                    >
                    > What I thought of doing first is to find a way to transport with the sail bent onto the spars which would require a tight fitting cover to protect the sail while holding both gaff and boom. With this method it may also be better to carry in the boat rather than alongside on the trailer. My current way of attaching the luff to the mast uses rope cringles looped through grommets in the sail that must be slid up the mast as it is stepped. This will not work well with spars in the way while stepping the mast so I may need to leave them on like mast hoops and lash, toggle or snap shackle the sail to them. Being able to keep the halyards and other rigging on the mast would also simplify setup, but require another cover to protect and organize the lines while towing. It normally takes almost an hour to get everything ready but with these few changes I hope to reduce that by half.
                    >
                    > Another potential efficiency improvement would be better gear storage onboard. I also found myself moving loads of stuff form the boat to the tow vehicle at home, then back at launching; reverse and repeat again for hauling out and returning home. With gear properly stowed in and lashed to the boat it could be left there while on the road. First here should be attachments for the floorboards, oars and ground tackle. Then gear tie-downs for items stowed forward under the deck and a cover for the storage space aft.   
                    >
                    > Reefing control lines would also be a sensible improvement. It was windy while setting up so I tied in a reef before launching, but it would be difficult underway when needed most, and I even had a bit of trouble just shaking it out as the wind faded. The problem is that it is hard to reach the aft end of the boom and the sail fills as I hold onto it while tying or untying the individual reef ties. I see this additional rigging as a valuable use of setup time saved elsewhere. I will also use a proper reef knot with a loop in it on the reefpoint sail ties, rather than a square knot, to make it easy to undo.          
                    >
                    > Most of these ideas are functional improvements but I also want to keep my boat looking good.  Paint and varnish; that's another story though. Most areas got primer and only one coat without annual repainting. The sand used as non-slip surface on deck is too rough, so it needs additional coats of paint. A minimum number of varnish coats were used on brightwork where for best results more is best.
                    >
                    > To help organize and prioritize all this work,  I think it best to take a trip to the lake for another afternoon sail or two.  
                    >
                    >                              
                    >
                    > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Jay Bazuzi <jay@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > It takes me a while to prep the boat before I leave the house, then rig at
                    > > the boat ramp, then launch, then park, then raise sail & cast off.
                    > > -J
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 7:38 AM, dkp390 <dkp390@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > >There is an article called "The
                    > > > catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association (
                    > > > http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you will
                    > > > want to know about and experiment with.
                    > > > strong gusts. It responds well to
                    > > >
                    > > > <glasscocklanding@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had
                    > > > been abandoned. The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think)
                    > > > inside and out, and is sound. The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are
                    > > > sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck. The seat and
                    > > > coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and
                    > > > transom. The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will
                    > > > have to be replaced. I have always admired the look of these little cats.
                    > > > Are they decent sailors? Does anyone have a set of plans they might want
                    > > > to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard
                    > > > trunk and the other pieces that have to come out. Thanks, Sam
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Jay Bazuzi
                    I m on the verge of getting rid of my Bobcat, because I don t have time for it, but maybe if I could optimize things, I would sail it more. I keep my sail
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 31, 2010
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                      I'm on the verge of getting rid of my Bobcat, because I don't have time for it, but maybe if I could optimize things, I would sail it more.

                      I keep my sail attached to the gaff and boom. 

                      I keep the 4 lines going aloft in on the mast. The ends get paired & figure-8 knots, so they don't get lost. Then the bundle is clove-hitched to the mast, to keep things neat. 

                      I raise the mast, then attach the lines to the sail & run them through the right blocks, etc.

                      I'm thinking about removing the lazy jack and the topping lift. They're rarely useful to me. A single gasket is enough to keep the cockpit clear when I drop the sail.  Having only two lines aloft is way less work, since they won't tangle with each other.

                      I have a cover that is meant to go on when the boat is rigged, so it can be parked next to a boat ramp. It would be really convenient. As it is, I never use that cover.

                      When I get home, I hang the mast and the spars/sail bundle up in my garage, to keep them out of the sun. That's another delay. 

                      -J

                      On Mon, Aug 30, 2010 at 9:47 AM, robertchamberland <chamberlands@...> wrote:
                       

                      I kept the sail permanently on the spars also all the halliards and sheets. I made a long bag that everything would fit in. I also had a bag for the mast. When launching I rove all the halliards, set the boom and gaff on the boat with all the hoops lined up over the HOLE and kept them in line with a 4" piece of PVC then raised the mast and dropped it down the hole. It helps to have someone hold this assembly so it doesn't roll off the boat. I sometimes got the halliards lined up wrong but it was still a quick enough process. I'll post a picture if I can figure how.
                      Bob Chamberland



                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dkp390" <dkp390@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Boat ideas:
                      >
                      > I took out the sailboat For the first time in over a year yesterday and that got me thinking of improvements again.  As usual I did ignore the launch checklist created and even used the first few times. Why not use and update it each time? It might even remind me to check trailer tire pressure. All did go quite well though, no major items forgotten, no embarrassment, damage or do-overs worth mention. 
                      >
                      > Something I did notice was how much work it is to get out on the water trailering for a day sail.  How nice it would be to be able to leave it in the water and mostly ready to go, I could imagine setting up once a year then at each sail remove sail cover hoist halyards and sail away.  The advantage of indoor storage, infrequent use and distance from lakes in the area make trailering a necessity for me though. So I'm thinking of ways to simplify the process. The boat is a Bolger Bobcat 12' 6" gaff rigged catboat. It has no standing rigging but has mainsheet, throat and peak halyards, topping lift, lazy jacks and uses individual sail ties along the gaff and boom. The mast is carried along the side of her on the trailer and needs to be stepped each time so a mast tabernacle can be a possible future improvement. 
                      >
                      > What I thought of doing first is to find a way to transport with the sail bent onto the spars which would require a tight fitting cover to protect the sail while holding both gaff and boom. With this method it may also be better to carry in the boat rather than alongside on the trailer. My current way of attaching the luff to the mast uses rope cringles looped through grommets in the sail that must be slid up the mast as it is stepped. This will not work well with spars in the way while stepping the mast so I may need to leave them on like mast hoops and lash, toggle or snap shackle the sail to them. Being able to keep the halyards and other rigging on the mast would also simplify setup, but require another cover to protect and organize the lines while towing. It normally takes almost an hour to get everything ready but with these few changes I hope to reduce that by half.
                      >
                      > Another potential efficiency improvement would be better gear storage onboard. I also found myself moving loads of stuff form the boat to the tow vehicle at home, then back at launching; reverse and repeat again for hauling out and returning home. With gear properly stowed in and lashed to the boat it could be left there while on the road. First here should be attachments for the floorboards, oars and ground tackle. Then gear tie-downs for items stowed forward under the deck and a cover for the storage space aft.   
                      >
                      > Reefing control lines would also be a sensible improvement. It was windy while setting up so I tied in a reef before launching, but it would be difficult underway when needed most, and I even had a bit of trouble just shaking it out as the wind faded. The problem is that it is hard to reach the aft end of the boom and the sail fills as I hold onto it while tying or untying the individual reef ties. I see this additional rigging as a valuable use of setup time saved elsewhere. I will also use a proper reef knot with a loop in it on the reefpoint sail ties, rather than a square knot, to make it easy to undo.          
                      >
                      > Most of these ideas are functional improvements but I also want to keep my boat looking good.  Paint and varnish; that's another story though. Most areas got primer and only one coat without annual repainting. The sand used as non-slip surface on deck is too rough, so it needs additional coats of paint. A minimum number of varnish coats were used on brightwork where for best results more is best.
                      >
                      > To help organize and prioritize all this work,  I think it best to take a trip to the lake for another afternoon sail or two.  
                      >
                      >                              
                      >
                      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Jay Bazuzi <jay@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > It takes me a while to prep the boat before I leave the house, then rig at
                      > > the boat ramp, then launch, then park, then raise sail & cast off.
                      > > -J
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 7:38 AM, dkp390 <dkp390@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >There is an article called "The
                      > > > catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association (
                      > > > http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you will
                      > > > want to know about and experiment with.
                      > > > strong gusts. It responds well to
                      > > >
                      > > > <glasscocklanding@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had
                      > > > been abandoned. The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think)
                      > > > inside and out, and is sound. The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are
                      > > > sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck. The seat and
                      > > > coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and
                      > > > transom. The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will
                      > > > have to be replaced. I have always admired the look of these little cats.
                      > > > Are they decent sailors? Does anyone have a set of plans they might want
                      > > > to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard
                      > > > trunk and the other pieces that have to come out. Thanks, Sam
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >


                    • Patrick Crockett
                      Jay: An extra 20 or 30 minutes to get on the water and an extra 20 or 30 minutes when you get home to tidy up are definitely disincentives to going out on the
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 1 4:51 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Jay:

                        An extra 20 or 30 minutes to get on the water and an extra 20 or 30 minutes when you get home to tidy up are definitely disincentives to going out on the boat and it is worth paring the process down to the absolute essentials. However, the really big disincentive is having to drive 30 minutes or an hour to the water. If you don't live within sight of the water you need an additional incentive to get out -- a partner with whom you have arranged to go out or a club you race with (giving you a deadline and a set of days when you are expected to go out) or something like that. So -- everybody buy waterfront homes!!

                        Patrick


                        On Aug 31, 2010, at 4:10 PM, Jay Bazuzi wrote:



                        I'm on the verge of getting rid of my Bobcat, because I don't have time for it, but maybe if I could optimize things, I would sail it more.

                        I keep my sail attached to the gaff and boom. 

                        I keep the 4 lines going aloft in on the mast. The ends get paired & figure-8 knots, so they don't get lost. Then the bundle is clove-hitched to the mast, to keep things neat. 

                        I raise the mast, then attach the lines to the sail & run them through the right blocks, etc.

                        I'm thinking about removing the lazy jack and the topping lift. They're rarely useful to me. A single gasket is enough to keep the cockpit clear when I drop the sail.  Having only two lines aloft is way less work, since they won't tangle with each other.

                        I have a cover that is meant to go on when the boat is rigged, so it can be parked next to a boat ramp. It would be really convenient. As it is, I never use that cover.

                        When I get home, I hang the mast and the spars/sail bundle up in my garage, to keep them out of the sun. That's another delay. 

                        -J

                        On Mon, Aug 30, 2010 at 9:47 AM, robertchamberland <chamberlands@...> wrote:
                         

                        I kept the sail permanently on the spars also all the halliards and sheets. I made a long bag that everything would fit in. I also had a bag for the mast. When launching I rove all the halliards, set the boom and gaff on the boat with all the hoops lined up over the HOLE and kept them in line with a 4" piece of PVC then raised the mast and dropped it down the hole. It helps to have someone hold this assembly so it doesn't roll off the boat. I sometimes got the halliards lined up wrong but it was still a quick enough process. I'll post a picture if I can figure how.
                        Bob Chamberland



                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dkp390" <dkp390@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > 
                        > 
                        > Boat ideas:
                        > 
                        > I took out the sailboat For the first time in over a year yesterday and that got me thinking of improvements again.  As usual I did ignore the launch checklist created and even used the first few times. Why not use and update it each time? It might even remind me to check trailer tire pressure. All did go quite well though, no major items forgotten, no embarrassment, damage or do-overs worth mention. 
                        > 
                        > Something I did notice was how much work it is to get out on the water trailering for a day sail.  How nice it would be to be able to leave it in the water and mostly ready to go, I could imagine setting up once a year then at each sail remove sail cover hoist halyards and sail away.  The advantage of indoor storage, infrequent use and distance from lakes in the area make trailering a necessity for me though. So I'm thinking of ways to simplify the process. The boat is a Bolger Bobcat 12' 6" gaff rigged catboat. It has no standing rigging but has mainsheet, throat and peak halyards, topping lift, lazy jacks and uses individual sail ties along the gaff and boom. The mast is carried along the side of her on the trailer and needs to be stepped each time so a mast tabernacle can be a possible future improvement. 
                        > 
                        > What I thought of doing first is to find a way to transport with the sail bent onto the spars which would require a tight fitting cover to protect the sail while holding both gaff and boom. With this method it may also be better to carry in the boat rather than alongside on the trailer. My current way of attaching the luff to the mast uses rope cringles looped through grommets in the sail that must be slid up the mast as it is stepped. This will not work well with spars in the way while stepping the mast so I may need to leave them on like mast hoops and lash, toggle or snap shackle the sail to them. Being able to keep the halyards and other rigging on the mast would also simplify setup, but require another cover to protect and organize the lines while towing. It normally takes almost an hour to get everything ready but with these few changes I hope to reduce that by half.
                        > 
                        > Another potential efficiency improvement would be better gear storage onboard. I also found myself moving loads of stuff form the boat to the tow vehicle at home, then back at launching; reverse and repeat again for hauling out and returning home. With gear properly stowed in and lashed to the boat it could be left there while on the road. First here should be attachments for the floorboards, oars and ground tackle. Then gear tie-downs for items stowed forward under the deck and a cover for the storage space aft.   
                        > 
                        > Reefing control lines would also be a sensible improvement. It was windy while setting up so I tied in a reef before launching, but it would be difficult underway when needed most, and I even had a bit of trouble just shaking it out as the wind faded. The problem is that it is hard to reach the aft end of the boom and the sail fills as I hold onto it while tying or untying the individual reef ties. I see this additional rigging as a valuable use of setup time saved elsewhere. I will also use a proper reef knot with a loop in it on the reefpoint sail ties, rather than a square knot, to make it easy to undo.          
                        > 
                        > Most of these ideas are functional improvements but I also want to keep my boat looking good.  Paint and varnish; that's another story though. Most areas got primer and only one coat without annual repainting. The sand used as non-slip surface on deck is too rough, so it needs additional coats of paint. A minimum number of varnish coats were used on brightwork where for best results more is best.
                        > 
                        > To help organize and prioritize all this work,  I think it best to take a trip to the lake for another afternoon sail or two.  
                        > 
                        >                              
                        > 
                        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Jay Bazuzi <jay@> wrote:
                        > > 
                        > > It takes me a while to prep the boat before I leave the house, then rig at
                        > > the boat ramp, then launch, then park, then raise sail & cast off. 
                        > > -J 
                        > > 
                        > > 
                        > > On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 7:38 AM, dkp390 <dkp390@> wrote:
                        > > > 
                        > > >There is an article called "The
                        > > > catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association (
                        > > > http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you will
                        > > > want to know about and experiment with. 
                        > > > strong gusts. It responds well to
                        > > >
                        > > > <glasscocklanding@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had
                        > > > been abandoned. The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think)
                        > > > inside and out, and is sound. The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are
                        > > > sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck. The seat and
                        > > > coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and
                        > > > transom. The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will
                        > > > have to be replaced. I have always admired the look of these little cats.
                        > > > Are they decent sailors? Does anyone have a set of plans they might want
                        > > > to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard
                        > > > trunk and the other pieces that have to come out. Thanks, Sam
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > 
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >






                      • Jay Bazuzi
                        I love that I live close to the water. I m Port Townsend, WA, USA. The city has water on 3 sides. There are 3 boat launches available to me, with drive times
                        Message 11 of 14 , Sep 1 7:22 PM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I love that I live close to the water. I'm Port Townsend, WA, USA. The city has water on 3 sides. There are 3 boat launches available to me, with drive times <= 5 minutes. So at least that part is quick!

                          I had another thought today: what about leaving the rudder on? I take it off and stow it in the boat when the boat is on the trailer, but is that important? 

                          Many trailer-sailors have deep rudders, so you have to pull them out to avoid dragging on the ground. But the Bobcat's rudder is no deeper than the small skeg, so that's not an issue. It would save a  step.

                          Mine came with a small electric trolling motor, which is a real pain - there's no good place on a Bobcat to put one. It has seized up, so I'm leaving it at home now, which saves another step. I guess I should leave the battery home, too.

                          -J

                          On Wed, Sep 1, 2010 at 4:51 AM, Patrick Crockett <pcrockett@...> wrote:
                           

                          Jay:


                          An extra 20 or 30 minutes to get on the water and an extra 20 or 30 minutes when you get home to tidy up are definitely disincentives to going out on the boat and it is worth paring the process down to the absolute essentials. However, the really big disincentive is having to drive 30 minutes or an hour to the water. If you don't live within sight of the water you need an additional incentive to get out -- a partner with whom you have arranged to go out or a club you race with (giving you a deadline and a set of days when you are expected to go out) or something like that. So -- everybody buy waterfront homes!!

                          Patrick


                          On Aug 31, 2010, at 4:10 PM, Jay Bazuzi wrote:



                          I'm on the verge of getting rid of my Bobcat, because I don't have time for it, but maybe if I could optimize things, I would sail it more.

                          I keep my sail attached to the gaff and boom. 

                          I keep the 4 lines going aloft in on the mast. The ends get paired & figure-8 knots, so they don't get lost. Then the bundle is clove-hitched to the mast, to keep things neat. 

                          I raise the mast, then attach the lines to the sail & run them through the right blocks, etc.

                          I'm thinking about removing the lazy jack and the topping lift. They're rarely useful to me. A single gasket is enough to keep the cockpit clear when I drop the sail.  Having only two lines aloft is way less work, since they won't tangle with each other.

                          I have a cover that is meant to go on when the boat is rigged, so it can be parked next to a boat ramp. It would be really convenient. As it is, I never use that cover.

                          When I get home, I hang the mast and the spars/sail bundle up in my garage, to keep them out of the sun. That's another delay. 

                          -J

                          On Mon, Aug 30, 2010 at 9:47 AM, robertchamberland <chamberlands@...> wrote:
                           

                          I kept the sail permanently on the spars also all the halliards and sheets. I made a long bag that everything would fit in. I also had a bag for the mast. When launching I rove all the halliards, set the boom and gaff on the boat with all the hoops lined up over the HOLE and kept them in line with a 4" piece of PVC then raised the mast and dropped it down the hole. It helps to have someone hold this assembly so it doesn't roll off the boat. I sometimes got the halliards lined up wrong but it was still a quick enough process. I'll post a picture if I can figure how.
                          Bob Chamberland



                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dkp390" <dkp390@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > 
                          > 
                          > Boat ideas:
                          > 
                          > I took out the sailboat For the first time in over a year yesterday and that got me thinking of improvements again.  As usual I did ignore the launch checklist created and even used the first few times. Why not use and update it each time? It might even remind me to check trailer tire pressure. All did go quite well though, no major items forgotten, no embarrassment, damage or do-overs worth mention. 
                          > 
                          > Something I did notice was how much work it is to get out on the water trailering for a day sail.  How nice it would be to be able to leave it in the water and mostly ready to go, I could imagine setting up once a year then at each sail remove sail cover hoist halyards and sail away.  The advantage of indoor storage, infrequent use and distance from lakes in the area make trailering a necessity for me though. So I'm thinking of ways to simplify the process. The boat is a Bolger Bobcat 12' 6" gaff rigged catboat. It has no standing rigging but has mainsheet, throat and peak halyards, topping lift, lazy jacks and uses individual sail ties along the gaff and boom. The mast is carried along the side of her on the trailer and needs to be stepped each time so a mast tabernacle can be a possible future improvement. 
                          > 
                          > What I thought of doing first is to find a way to transport with the sail bent onto the spars which would require a tight fitting cover to protect the sail while holding both gaff and boom. With this method it may also be better to carry in the boat rather than alongside on the trailer. My current way of attaching the luff to the mast uses rope cringles looped through grommets in the sail that must be slid up the mast as it is stepped. This will not work well with spars in the way while stepping the mast so I may need to leave them on like mast hoops and lash, toggle or snap shackle the sail to them. Being able to keep the halyards and other rigging on the mast would also simplify setup, but require another cover to protect and organize the lines while towing. It normally takes almost an hour to get everything ready but with these few changes I hope to reduce that by half.
                          > 
                          > Another potential efficiency improvement would be better gear storage onboard. I also found myself moving loads of stuff form the boat to the tow vehicle at home, then back at launching; reverse and repeat again for hauling out and returning home. With gear properly stowed in and lashed to the boat it could be left there while on the road. First here should be attachments for the floorboards, oars and ground tackle. Then gear tie-downs for items stowed forward under the deck and a cover for the storage space aft.   
                          > 
                          > Reefing control lines would also be a sensible improvement. It was windy while setting up so I tied in a reef before launching, but it would be difficult underway when needed most, and I even had a bit of trouble just shaking it out as the wind faded. The problem is that it is hard to reach the aft end of the boom and the sail fills as I hold onto it while tying or untying the individual reef ties. I see this additional rigging as a valuable use of setup time saved elsewhere. I will also use a proper reef knot with a loop in it on the reefpoint sail ties, rather than a square knot, to make it easy to undo.          
                          > 
                          > Most of these ideas are functional improvements but I also want to keep my boat looking good.  Paint and varnish; that's another story though. Most areas got primer and only one coat without annual repainting. The sand used as non-slip surface on deck is too rough, so it needs additional coats of paint. A minimum number of varnish coats were used on brightwork where for best results more is best.
                          > 
                          > To help organize and prioritize all this work,  I think it best to take a trip to the lake for another afternoon sail or two.  
                          > 
                          >                              
                          > 
                          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Jay Bazuzi <jay@> wrote:
                          > > 
                          > > It takes me a while to prep the boat before I leave the house, then rig at
                          > > the boat ramp, then launch, then park, then raise sail & cast off. 
                          > > -J 
                          > > 
                          > > 
                          > > On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 7:38 AM, dkp390 <dkp390@> wrote:
                          > > > 
                          > > >There is an article called "The
                          > > > catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association (
                          > > > http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you will
                          > > > want to know about and experiment with. 
                          > > > strong gusts. It responds well to
                          > > >
                          > > > <glasscocklanding@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where it had
                          > > > been abandoned. The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I think)
                          > > > inside and out, and is sound. The bow deck/side decks are sheathed, and are
                          > > > sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck. The seat and
                          > > > coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the rudder and
                          > > > transom. The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like it will
                          > > > have to be replaced. I have always admired the look of these little cats.
                          > > > Are they decent sailors? Does anyone have a set of plans they might want
                          > > > to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the centerboard
                          > > > trunk and the other pieces that have to come out. Thanks, Sam
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > 
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >







                        • Eric
                          You want really fast? Leave the mast up and leave the boat rigged as if on a mooring. If the mast is not any higher than an 18 wheeler it will fit under
                          Message 12 of 14 , Sep 1 7:32 PM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            You want really fast? Leave the mast up and leave the boat rigged as if on a mooring. If the mast is not any higher than an 18 wheeler it will fit under bridges etc, most gas stations will be OK, just don't pull in a parking garage. Use the ubiquitous blue tarp to cover the boat and rig to keep sun, rain, and road sklutch off. Then you will be down to removing the blue tarp and launching the boat. I probably wouldn't tow it at more than 45 mph. But the windage would be a lot less than the canvas tops people frequently leave up on their runabouts when they tow them.
                            Eric


                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Jay Bazuzi <jay@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I love that I live close to the water. I'm Port Townsend, WA, USA. The city
                            > has water on 3 sides. There are 3 boat launches available to me, with drive
                            > times <= 5 minutes. So at least that part is quick!
                            >
                            > I had another thought today: what about leaving the rudder on? I take it off
                            > and stow it in the boat when the boat is on the trailer, but is that
                            > important?
                            >
                            > Many trailer-sailors have deep rudders, so you have to pull them out to
                            > avoid dragging on the ground. But the Bobcat's rudder is no deeper than the
                            > small skeg, so that's not an issue. It would save a step.
                            >
                            > Mine came with a small electric trolling motor, which is a real pain -
                            > there's no good place on a Bobcat to put one. It has seized up, so I'm
                            > leaving it at home now, which saves another step. I guess I should leave the
                            > battery home, too.
                            >
                            > -J
                            >
                            > On Wed, Sep 1, 2010 at 4:51 AM, Patrick Crockett <pcrockett@...>wrote:
                            >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Jay:
                            > >
                            > > An extra 20 or 30 minutes to get on the water and an extra 20 or 30 minutes
                            > > when you get home to tidy up are definitely disincentives to going out on
                            > > the boat and it is worth paring the process down to the absolute essentials.
                            > > However, the really big disincentive is having to drive 30 minutes or an
                            > > hour to the water. If you don't live within sight of the water you need an
                            > > additional incentive to get out -- a partner with whom you have arranged to
                            > > go out or a club you race with (giving you a deadline and a set of days when
                            > > you are expected to go out) or something like that. So -- everybody buy
                            > > waterfront homes!!
                            > >
                            > > Patrick
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > On Aug 31, 2010, at 4:10 PM, Jay Bazuzi wrote:
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > I'm on the verge of getting rid of my Bobcat, because I don't have time for
                            > > it, but maybe if I could optimize things, I would sail it more.
                            > >
                            > > I keep my sail attached to the gaff and boom.
                            > >
                            > > I keep the 4 lines going aloft in on the mast. The ends get paired &
                            > > figure-8 knots, so they don't get lost. Then the bundle is clove-hitched to
                            > > the mast, to keep things neat.
                            > >
                            > > I raise the mast, then attach the lines to the sail & run them through the
                            > > right blocks, etc.
                            > >
                            > > I'm thinking about removing the lazy jack and the topping lift. They're
                            > > rarely useful to me. A single gasket is enough to keep the cockpit clear
                            > > when I drop the sail. Having only two lines aloft is way less work, since
                            > > they won't tangle with each other.
                            > >
                            > > I have a cover that is meant to go on when the boat is rigged, so it can be
                            > > parked next to a boat ramp. It would be really convenient. As it is, I never
                            > > use that cover.
                            > >
                            > > When I get home, I hang the mast and the spars/sail bundle up in my garage,
                            > > to keep them out of the sun. That's another delay.
                            > >
                            > > -J
                            > >
                            > > On Mon, Aug 30, 2010 at 9:47 AM, robertchamberland <
                            > > chamberlands@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> I kept the sail permanently on the spars also all the halliards and
                            > >> sheets. I made a long bag that everything would fit in. I also had a bag for
                            > >> the mast. When launching I rove all the halliards, set the boom and gaff on
                            > >> the boat with all the hoops lined up over the HOLE and kept them in line
                            > >> with a 4" piece of PVC then raised the mast and dropped it down the hole. It
                            > >> helps to have someone hold this assembly so it doesn't roll off the boat. I
                            > >> sometimes got the halliards lined up wrong but it was still a quick enough
                            > >> process. I'll post a picture if I can figure how.
                            > >> Bob Chamberland
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger%40yahoogroups.com>, "dkp390"
                            > >> <dkp390@> wrote:
                            > >> >
                            > >> >
                            > >> >
                            > >> > Boat ideas:
                            > >> >
                            > >> > I took out the sailboat For the first time in over a year yesterday and
                            > >> that got me thinking of improvements again. As usual I did ignore the
                            > >> launch checklist created and even used the first few times. Why not use and
                            > >> update it each time? It might even remind me to check trailer tire pressure.
                            > >> All did go quite well though, no major items forgotten, no embarrassment,
                            > >> damage or do-overs worth mention.
                            > >> >
                            > >> > Something I did notice was how much work it is to get out on the water
                            > >> trailering for a day sail. How nice it would be to be able to leave it in
                            > >> the water and mostly ready to go, I could imagine setting up once a year
                            > >> then at each sail remove sail cover hoist halyards and sail away. The
                            > >> advantage of indoor storage, infrequent use and distance from lakes in the
                            > >> area make trailering a necessity for me though. So I'm thinking of ways to
                            > >> simplify the process. The boat is a Bolger Bobcat 12' 6" gaff rigged
                            > >> catboat. It has no standing rigging but has mainsheet, throat and peak
                            > >> halyards, topping lift, lazy jacks and uses individual sail ties along the
                            > >> gaff and boom. The mast is carried along the side of her on the trailer and
                            > >> needs to be stepped each time so a mast tabernacle can be a possible future
                            > >> improvement.
                            > >> >
                            > >> > What I thought of doing first is to find a way to transport with the
                            > >> sail bent onto the spars which would require a tight fitting cover to
                            > >> protect the sail while holding both gaff and boom. With this method it may
                            > >> also be better to carry in the boat rather than alongside on the trailer. My
                            > >> current way of attaching the luff to the mast uses rope cringles looped
                            > >> through grommets in the sail that must be slid up the mast as it is stepped.
                            > >> This will not work well with spars in the way while stepping the mast so I
                            > >> may need to leave them on like mast hoops and lash, toggle or snap shackle
                            > >> the sail to them. Being able to keep the halyards and other rigging on the
                            > >> mast would also simplify setup, but require another cover to protect and
                            > >> organize the lines while towing. It normally takes almost an hour to get
                            > >> everything ready but with these few changes I hope to reduce that by half.
                            > >> >
                            > >> > Another potential efficiency improvement would be better gear storage
                            > >> onboard. I also found myself moving loads of stuff form the boat to the tow
                            > >> vehicle at home, then back at launching; reverse and repeat again for
                            > >> hauling out and returning home. With gear properly stowed in and lashed to
                            > >> the boat it could be left there while on the road. First here should be
                            > >> attachments for the floorboards, oars and ground tackle. Then gear tie-downs
                            > >> for items stowed forward under the deck and a cover for the storage space
                            > >> aft.
                            > >> >
                            > >> > Reefing control lines would also be a sensible improvement. It was windy
                            > >> while setting up so I tied in a reef before launching, but it would be
                            > >> difficult underway when needed most, and I even had a bit of trouble just
                            > >> shaking it out as the wind faded. The problem is that it is hard to reach
                            > >> the aft end of the boom and the sail fills as I hold onto it while tying or
                            > >> untying the individual reef ties. I see this additional rigging as a
                            > >> valuable use of setup time saved elsewhere. I will also use a proper reef
                            > >> knot with a loop in it on the reefpoint sail ties, rather than a square
                            > >> knot, to make it easy to undo.
                            > >> >
                            > >> > Most of these ideas are functional improvements but I also want to keep
                            > >> my boat looking good. Paint and varnish; that's another story though. Most
                            > >> areas got primer and only one coat without annual repainting. The sand used
                            > >> as non-slip surface on deck is too rough, so it needs additional coats of
                            > >> paint. A minimum number of varnish coats were used on brightwork where for
                            > >> best results more is best.
                            > >> >
                            > >> > To help organize and prioritize all this work, I think it best to take
                            > >> a trip to the lake for another afternoon sail or two.
                            > >> >
                            > >> >
                            > >> >
                            > >> > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger%40yahoogroups.com>, Jay Bazuzi
                            > >> <jay@> wrote:
                            > >> > >
                            > >> > > It takes me a while to prep the boat before I leave the house, then
                            > >> rig at
                            > >> > > the boat ramp, then launch, then park, then raise sail & cast off.
                            > >> > > -J
                            > >> > >
                            > >> > >
                            > >> > > On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 7:38 AM, dkp390 <dkp390@> wrote:
                            > >> > > >
                            > >> > > >There is an article called "The
                            > >> > > > catboat and how to sail her" available from the catboat association
                            > >> (
                            > >> > > > http://www.catboats.org/pubs.php) recommended with some details you
                            > >> will
                            > >> > > > want to know about and experiment with.
                            > >> > > > strong gusts. It responds well to
                            > >> > > >
                            > >> > > > <glasscocklanding@> wrote:
                            > >> > > > >
                            > >> > > > > I recently received a free Bobcat from a local sailing club where
                            > >> it had
                            > >> > > > been abandoned. The hull is sheathed with glass (in polyester, I
                            > >> think)
                            > >> > > > inside and out, and is sound. The bow deck/side decks are sheathed,
                            > >> and are
                            > >> > > > sound except where the mast is stepped through the deck. The seat
                            > >> and
                            > >> > > > coamings are shot, and will have to be replaced, along with the
                            > >> rudder and
                            > >> > > > transom. The big problem is the centerboard trunk, which looks like
                            > >> it will
                            > >> > > > have to be replaced. I have always admired the look of these little
                            > >> cats.
                            > >> > > > Are they decent sailors? Does anyone have a set of plans they might
                            > >> want
                            > >> > > > to sell/trade, which would be very helpful for rebuilding the
                            > >> centerboard
                            > >> > > > trunk and the other pieces that have to come out. Thanks, Sam
                            > >> > > > >
                            > >> > > >
                            > >> > > >
                            > >> > > >
                            > >> > >
                            > >> >
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • Patrick Crockett
                            Jay: I totally envy you -- I d love to live in Port Townsend! I used to race a one-design dinghy. There were guys who would leave their shrouds attached so all
                            Message 13 of 14 , Sep 1 7:43 PM
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                              Jay:

                              I totally envy you -- I'd love to live in Port Townsend!

                              I used to race a one-design dinghy. There were guys who would leave their shrouds attached so all they had to do was seat the mast in the step and attach the fore-stay. Some would leave the mainsail foot rope in the boom (and roll the sail around the boom rather than fold it and put it into a bag) so they only had to thread the luff rope into the mast to raise the sail. (A lot of catamaran sailors seem to do this.) Some left the rudder attached, but it seems like a really minimal amount of time to slip the rudder's pintles into its gudgeons. Seems to me that usually the most time-consuming thing is getting the mast up -- that's where I'd focus my first time-saving efforts. And if you don't have to go far (or fast) to get from home to the water (and back), you could minimize the tie-downs for the hull and spars. When I'm trundling a half mile from a rented cottage on Ocracoke Island to the boat ramp or back, I rarely bother to tie down the mast -- I just lay it on the boat and it does just fine for the few blocks of slow island driving. In the other hand, for the two hours of highway driving from home to Ocracoke I carefully tie the mast to the boat and wrap a rope or multiple bungee cords around the sail, yard, boom, and mast to make sure the sail doesn't flap to death -- this takes 15 or 20 minutes to tie up and untie.

                              Patrick

                              On 09/01/2010 10:22 PM, Jay Bazuzi wrote: I love that I live close to the water. I'm Port Townsend, WA, USA. The city has water on 3 sides. There are 3 boat launches available to me, with drive times <= 5 minutes. So at least that part is quick!

                              I had another thought today: what about leaving the rudder on? I take it off and stow it in the boat when the boat is on the trailer, but is that important? 

                              Many trailer-sailors have deep rudders, so you have to pull them out to avoid dragging on the ground. But the Bobcat's rudder is no deeper than the small skeg, so that's not an issue. It would save a  step.

                              Mine came with a small electric trolling motor, which is a real pain - there's no good place on a Bobcat to put one. It has seized up, so I'm leaving it at home now, which saves another step. I guess I should leave the battery home, too.

                              -J

                            • Jay Bazuzi
                              I took my Bobcat out today, as part of the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival sail-by. I applied as many tricks as I could think of to make launching &
                              Message 14 of 14 , Sep 12 6:59 PM
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                                I took my Bobcat out today, as part of the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival sail-by. I applied as many tricks as I could think of to make launching & recovery faster & easier. 

                                The #1 win was from removing the topping lift and lazyjack. It's not just 50% less rigging aloft - it's also way less tangling. I didn't miss them.

                                I left the rudder on (removed the tiller) and secured it with the same line that secures the stern framework that holds the spars when I'm driving.

                                I have a dockline that is always attached to a cleat aft. That dockline is now the line I use to tie down the spars aft. It's not simpler, but it's fewer lines.

                                Similarly, there's a bow eye with a line attached, which I now use to tie down the spars forward.

                                I'm trying out using the sheet to wrap up the sail/gaff/boom. It's not less work, but I can skip the 6 separate gaskets.

                                It took me about 10 minutes to launch, which I'm happy with. Recovery was a little longer, but not too bad.

                                I tried leaving the "lace lines" on the gaff and boom jaws tied, and leaving the halyards attached, but that didn't work. I'd probably end up fouling something and dropping the mast.

                                -J


                                On Wed, Sep 1, 2010 at 7:43 PM, Patrick Crockett <pcrockett@...> wrote:
                                 

                                Jay:

                                I totally envy you -- I'd love to live in Port Townsend!

                                I used to race a one-design dinghy. There were guys who would leave their shrouds attached so all they had to do was seat the mast in the step and attach the fore-stay. Some would leave the mainsail foot rope in the boom (and roll the sail around the boom rather than fold it and put it into a bag) so they only had to thread the luff rope into the mast to raise the sail. (A lot of catamaran sailors seem to do this.) Some left the rudder attached, but it seems like a really minimal amount of time to slip the rudder's pintles into its gudgeons. Seems to me that usually the most time-consuming thing is getting the mast up -- that's where I'd focus my first time-saving efforts. And if you don't have to go far (or fast) to get from home to the water (and back), you could minimize the tie-downs for the hull and spars. When I'm trundling a half mile from a rented cottage on Ocracoke Island to the boat ramp or back, I rarely bother to tie down the mast -- I just lay it on the boat and it does just fine for the few blocks of slow island driving. In the other hand, for the two hours of highway driving from home to Ocracoke I carefully tie the mast to the boat and wrap a rope or multiple bungee cords around the sail, yard, boom, and mast to make sure the sail doesn't flap to death -- this takes 15 or 20 minutes to tie up and untie.

                                Patrick



                                On 09/01/2010 10:22 PM, Jay Bazuzi wrote:
                                I love that I live close to the water. I'm Port Townsend, WA, USA. The city has water on 3 sides. There are 3 boat launches available to me, with drive times <= 5 minutes. So at least that part is quick!

                                I had another thought today: what about leaving the rudder on? I take it off and stow it in the boat when the boat is on the trailer, but is that important? 

                                Many trailer-sailors have deep rudders, so you have to pull them out to avoid dragging on the ground. But the Bobcat's rudder is no deeper than the small skeg, so that's not an issue. It would save a  step.

                                Mine came with a small electric trolling motor, which is a real pain - there's no good place on a Bobcat to put one. It has seized up, so I'm leaving it at home now, which saves another step. I guess I should leave the battery home, too.

                                -J


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