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sanding, lumps, rudder

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  • Lincoln Ross
    Can only stand sanding glass and epoxy an hour at a time. The more I do it, the less I hate lumps. Wonder if I go on long enough if I will feel like putting
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 30, 2000
      Can only stand sanding glass and epoxy an hour at a time. The more I
      do it, the less I hate lumps. Wonder if I go on long enough if I will
      feel like putting the lumps back on. Wishing they made MDO 1/4"
      occume
      and I had used it. Any time I start a boat from scratch from now on I
      intend to put the glass on the sheets first. Still have another boat
      to glass after this one.

      Wondering if when I have the Nymph done I can cartop it under the
      Brick or Roar II!

      Also set up tiller on brick with pivot a la Michalak so I can lift it
      up and duck under. My S.O. has volunteered to do the detail painting
      and varnishing, and even touch up paint on the hull.
    • Vince Chew
      On my Dakota I am applying all the glass sheathing to the panels while they are flat on my work table before bending them onto the hull. A tip on lumps is to
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 30, 2000
        On my Dakota I am applying all the glass sheathing to the panels
        while they are flat on my work table before bending them onto the
        hull. A tip on lumps is to use a sharp paint scraper, carbide blade
        if you can find one, while the epoxy is still "green" (first 12 hours
        or so). The rule is to scrape as soon as you can, but let it harden
        as long as possible before you sand. (Less gumming up your sand
        paper). I never use finer than 80 grit paper to sand epoxy. In fact,
        most of the time I use 40 grit. Before painting, I wash the final
        coat and use a ScotchBrite final finish pad.

        --- In bolger@egroups.com, "Lincoln Ross" <lincolnr@m...> wrote:
        > Can only stand sanding glass and epoxy an hour at a time. The more
        I
        > do it, the less I hate lumps. Wonder if I go on long enough if I
        will
        > feel like putting the lumps back on. Wishing they made MDO 1/4"
        > occume
        > and I had used it. Any time I start a boat from scratch from now on
        I
        > intend to put the glass on the sheets first. Still have another
        boat
        > to glass after this one.
        >
        > Wondering if when I have the Nymph done I can cartop it under the
        > Brick or Roar II!
        >
        > Also set up tiller on brick with pivot a la Michalak so I can lift
        it
        > up and duck under. My S.O. has volunteered to do the detail
        painting
        > and varnishing, and even touch up paint on the hull.
      • David Ryan
        ... Is there any laminated joint effect that is lost doing it this way rather than laminating *after* the plywood is bent into shape? YIBB, David CRUMBLING
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 30, 2000
          >On my Dakota I am applying all the glass sheathing to the panels
          >while they are flat on my work table before bending them onto the
          >hull.

          Is there any "laminated joint" effect that is lost doing it this way
          rather than laminating *after* the plywood is bent into shape?

          YIBB,

          David

          CRUMBLING EMPIRE PRODUCTIONS
          134 W.26th St. 12th Floor
          New York, NY 10001
          (212) 247-0296
        • Vince Chew
          David, If you are asking if my glass sheathing continues across the butt-joints, the answer is yes. My work table is 40 ft. long (sawhorses and planks). I
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 1, 2000
            David,

            If you are asking if my glass sheathing continues across the
            butt-joints, the answer is yes. My work table is 40 ft. long
            (sawhorses and planks). I joined all of the sheets (5) in each
            layer using three layers of 9 oz. bias tape on each side.
            After building six layers one on top the other, I drew the
            curvature of one side of the bottom and sawed the curve in as
            many layers as my circular saw would penetrate (4 and part way
            into layer 5) at one time. I applied glass cloth in epoxy to
            the top two layers in the stack (had to flip one of them
            first). These were then turned over and became the bottom
            layer of the 3 layer bottom. BTW I am using 1/2 in. MDO. I
            have a series of rope block-and-tackles which slide in
            sections of sliding door track attached to my rafters on 8 ft.
            centers. I can lift a 40' x 4' x1/2" panel off my table and
            maneuver it over to the boat in about 4 minutes. I have to go
            up and down the line adjusting pulleys several times during
            the maneuver. I cleat the tails of the rope tackles on the
            handles of the C clamps which I use to grab onto the panel.
            After getting 2 layers attached to the bottom with thickened
            epoxy and screws, I could then finish cutting through the rest
            of the layers following the saw kerf left in layer 5. There is
            a full lenghth center shoe (keel) on this design which is
            about 2 ft wide and 4 layers of 1/2 in. ply thick. This allows
            the bottom layers to run fore and aft joining up the center
            over this shoe. So the center 2 ft of the hull is 7 layers of
            1/2 in. (Bolger designed this hull as a river cruiser, and
            there are all sorts of things found floating in most rivers.
            Hopefully, the bottom of my boat will take an occasional
            floating log in stride.) I am just today glueing the last
            layers of the bottom onto the hull.

            Vince
            >
            > Is there any "laminated joint" effect that is lost doing it this
            way
            > rather than laminating *after* the plywood is bent into shape?
            >
            > YIBB,
            >
            > David
            >
            > CRUMBLING EMPIRE PRODUCTIONS
            > 134 W.26th St. 12th Floor
            > New York, NY 10001
            > (212) 247-0296
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