Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [bolger] Re: Walkure

Expand Messages
  • Fred Schumacher
    On Tue, May 11, 2010 at 5:05 AM, creditscorenz ... There are always risks involved in setting out on water. There is a tension between the need to stay
    Message 1 of 23 , May 11, 2010
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      On Tue, May 11, 2010 at 5:05 AM, creditscorenz <creditscorenz@...> wrote:
       

      Not long after launching my friend was tacking to windward up a channel when caught aback by a gust: the boat capsized. It remained on its side, until a motor cruiser pulled it upright via a line attached to the boom gallows.

      I joined my rather traumatized friend shortly after and we loaded sand bags into cupboards either side, bringing the ballast up to about a ton. The sand was later replaced by lead under the sole. I did some coastal legs on the boat along the NSW coast (Australian east coast), but was always wary of being caught out in rough conditions.


      There are always risks involved  in setting out on water. There is a tension between the need to stay upright and between having so much ballast the boat can sink. There was an article a few years ago in Wooden Boat of a  famous Colin Archer redningskoite sinking suddenly. This is considered one of the safest boats afloat. The Jesse Cooper described above sounds like what happened to a car-carrying RORO ship in the Gulf of Alaska a few years ago. I was struck by how much that ship looked like a Bolger design. The high sides kept it afloat, even though it was lying on its side, like the Jesse Cooper, and the ship was ultimately salvaged. There are varying degrees of disaster.

      fred s.

    • loosemoosefilmworks
      Having sailed our Jessie Cooper (Loose Moose) some thousands of miles including two crossings of the Bay of Biscay (not known for its mildness) I seriously
      Message 2 of 23 , May 11, 2010
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Having sailed our Jessie Cooper (Loose Moose) some thousands of miles including two crossings of the Bay of Biscay (not known for its mildness) I seriously question the report of the Jessie Cooper for a variety of reasons.

        First of all any blame to the design or designer goes right out the window when the boat is not built to plans... Personally I have no issue changing a design but the minute it is done it is no longer a Jessie Cooper. Off hand if the builder in question changed the dagger board to leeboard what else was was changed?

        While it may be splitting hairs from the account the boat did not capsize it was knocked down and there really is a big difference between the two. Just about any modern sailboat these days can be knocked down and in this case there are quite a few possible causes as to why it stayed on its side and I doubt being under ballasted was one of them. If I were to guess I'd say more like ballast that was not properly stowed and bolted through as the design calls for.

        We found our Jessie Cooper to be surprisingly fast, weatherly and well behaved in big seas. Certainly a boat if built and sailed correctly able to take care of those aboard.

        Bob

        http://boatbits.blogspot.com/
        http://fishingundersail.blogspot.com/
        http://islandgourmand.blogspot.com/
      • graeme19121984
        ... oz is derived from a very successful paradigm, and, indeed, law, and society changing magazine in London, UK, in the 1960s. The publishers and most
        Message 3 of 23 , May 12, 2010
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          > What is OZ?

          'oz' is derived from a very successful paradigm, and, indeed, law, and society changing magazine in London, UK, in the 1960s. The publishers and most contributors were expat Aussies. The 'aus' in 'Aussie', or 'Australian' in widespread Australian announciation sounds very much like 'oz'. There were other connections to 'Oz' as in Judy Garland, and levels beyond, that escaspe me at this remove. I was younger then.

          The main, or most notorious force within and behind Oz the mag still writes provocatively, if now morphed 180 into someone having somewhat conservative views (trust noone over 30, eh?) for a Melbournian.

          Geoffry Robinson, the young expat lawer, having been handed a hopeless case, turned that around, made Oz unstoppable, and in changing the law changed the times. (Where would we be without the later Beatles freedom of expression, for example?) He has gone on, and continues to do many more significant things in the arena of international human rights, international justice, and the calling to account of war criminals from our time.

          > Could the MJ event be confused into a Jesse Cooper event?

          No.

          Delve into these archives. One MJ event, IIRC on one of the Great Lakes, snowballed. Note again the vested interests. The bloke in Oz, mentioned earlier, commenced the DFWB ripoff of PB&F plan sales; one, in the US, would like to.

          Graeme
        • graeme19121984
          ... Excellent guess.
          Message 4 of 23 , May 12, 2010
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            > My guess -- OZ is code for OZtralia. Down under pronunciation of the "a" is broader than I am accustomed to.

            Excellent guess.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.