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Re: Micro II Tabernacle

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  • prairiedog2332
    There is a photo of a Long Micro tabernacle in the files here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/files/Andrew%27s%20Long%20Micro/ The scantlings call for
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 28, 2010
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      There is a photo of a Long Micro tabernacle in the files here:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/files/Andrew%27s%20Long%20Micro/

      The scantlings call for 21/2" X 51/2" by 4'7" tall posts with 1/4" X 4"
      X 10" SS plates on the inside faces and a 3/4" pivot bolt. There has to
      be a 11/2" X 21/2" Xabout 10" chock installed across behind the posts
      at the bottom and through-bolted through the posts there. So the posts
      have to be thick enough to take these bolt holes.

      Of course on the Micro everything will be somewhat lighter since the
      sail plan and mast are smaller. I would think full 2" X 4" X about
      3'6" tall posts would work, since the mast is almost 4" at the partners.
      Your "standard" 2x6 would be a bit thin and wide, but maybe could have a
      1 X laminated to the outside part way up until the SS plates took over
      the stiffening requirement. Round off everything and it might not look
      too bad.

      Nels

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "BrianA" <bawrytr@...> wrote:
      >
      > I used three layers of 1cm by 6cm pine laminated together with epoxy
      for the tabernacle on the 12' mast on my boat. Worked well enough on the
      initial sail, but haven't had it out when the wind was really piping up,
      I must say. I think if I had to do it again I would have used good
      straight-grained oak on the two outside laminations -- not really all
      that much difference in weight, but very considerably stronger, and I
      think that a laminated board will be significantly stronger than the
      same kind and grade of solid wood the same dimensions.
      >
      > I also would steer clear of the plywood in that if you think about how
      it is made, something like half of the wood is straight cross-grain,
      giving next to no strength at all in tension or compression, and even
      the plies that are ostensibly long grain can be made up of a
      considerable amount of more of less cross grain. You often see this when
      you paint or varnish ply - some parts stay more or less smooth, other
      areas grow finely spaced sharp points -- areas where when they peeled
      the log, they cut through diagonal grain.
      >
      > Cheers, Brian
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Joe" scsbmsjoe@ wrote:
      > >
      > > I recomend solid wood. Fir is good. I would not use plywood because
      I don't think it would be as strong in this application. Anyone want to
      dispute this?
      > >
      > > Joe T
      > >
      > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "epoxy15" <cmccabe@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Since nobody wanted to buy my unfinished Micro and encouraged by a
      fellow Micro owner, I decided to finish the boat and go sailing! So---
      > > > I have the Micro II upgrade plans (not deckhouse version)and
      cannot visualize in 3D what the tabernacle will look like. Also any
      opinions whether the tabernacle should be made of laminated plywood or
      solid (fir) wood. Can anyone direct me to a photo of a finished Micro II
      tabernacle? Thanks in advance, Feel free to email me direct,
      > > >
      > > > Charles
      > > >
      > >
      >
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