Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [bolger] Re: Bolger cruising trimaran?

Expand Messages
  • Stuart Crawford
    I don¹t really see how container ports are not really equipped for this. I work in a container port and don¹t see why you couldn¹t sling a boat straight
    Message 1 of 30 , Mar 31, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Re: [bolger] Re: Bolger cruising trimaran? I don’t really see how container ports are not really equipped for this. I work in a container port and don’t see why you couldn’t sling a boat straight into the water, or out of it for that matter, with a portainer container crane. I know we have done that at our port. In fact if the boat was shipped on a flat rack, the boat could be launched off the far side of the ship in many cases, without even going onto the wharf, as the cranes are built for the largest ships which call at a particular port. Meaning that with many ships, the boom extends beyond the ship and out over the water on the other side.

      If the boat was on a flat rack, the boat could be lifted off and launched in one move, and the flat rack lifted onto the wharf on the second move. I would guess  that it would be cheaper than hiring in a portable crane for any standard launching.

      Stuart.


      On 1/4/10 8:23 AM, "loosemoosefilmworks" <loosemoosefilmworks@...> wrote:


      The problem with the container scenario is that at best it is very problematic as container ports are not really equipped to let you launch

      --
      http://www.nomadichome.org
      http://www.purevolume.com/KeltwegianKiwi
    • daschultz8275@sbcglobal.net
      In addition to the Schorpioen there is Double Eagle which was built I think in Alaska, or B.C. Canada. It also is a coastal cruiser, using a yawl boat instead
      Message 2 of 30 , May 4, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        In addition to the Schorpioen there is Double Eagle which was built I think in Alaska, or B.C. Canada. It also is a coastal cruiser, using a yawl boat instead of its own powerplant.

        Schorpioen, makes a lot of sense as a coastal cruiser for two. It seems well designed for something like the Great Loop of the Eastern half of North America because the outriggers easily retract for the locks, and the mast is reasonably dropped in its tabernacle. This would seem to work well in Europe, coastal and canal cruising. But I'd put it in a container and ship it over.

        I'd likely tow a June Bug, or similar skiff as a dinghy/pantry/tanker for more extended runs. Though the true shoal draft limits the need for a dinghy. PB&F showed a pair of Tortise for dinghy service but they were tied off on the extended floats which seems to burden the retraction process. I wouldn't have it that way, and Ed Medalis told me in emails we exchanged he would not have placed them out there either.
      • daschultz8275@sbcglobal.net
        MY apologies. Of course Double Eagle is a catamaran, not a tri.
        Message 3 of 30 , May 4, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          MY apologies. Of course Double Eagle is a catamaran, not a tri.
        • daschultz8275@sbcglobal.net
          ... One more coastal, even day-sailor design. You build the main hull, the rest is Hobie Cat. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/63676 Don
          Message 4 of 30 , May 4, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "jhess314" <j.hess@...> wrote:
            >
            > Does anyone know if Bolger designed an ocean-capable cruising trimaran?
            > Thanks, John
            >


            One more coastal, even day-sailor design. You build the main hull, the rest is Hobie Cat.

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/63676

            Don
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.