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Sneakeasy retractable board?

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  • Brent
    Have Sneakeasy plans and am thinking of including a retractable board just behind the bow to aid low speed maneuverability in cross winds. I read somewhere
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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      Have Sneakeasy plans and am thinking of including a retractable board just behind the bow to aid low speed maneuverability in cross winds. I read somewhere that it would be a good idea.

      It doesn't need to be large, so am wondering if a car electric-window-winder setup would be a reliable way to raise and lower it with a switch in the cockpit. I am thinking that it will be shaped like a segment of a circle and rotate about 90 degrees.

      The ones I have seen either use a cable/drum or gearbox/arm setup and have a pretty hard life inside a door so do you think it could work in this application?

      Perhaps it's been done before(?).
    • Bob Cook
      Do you live (or will the boat be used) near salt water? It has been my experience that things like that will last about a week around salt water. Bow
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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        Do you live (or will the boat be used) near salt water?  It has been my experience that things like that will last about a week around salt water.  Bow thrusters are getting down in cost and size lately.  Saw one the other day that would just cost an arm....so you could at least walk ashore. 
         




        From: Brent <brent.kennedy@...>
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, February 6, 2010 3:53:50 AM
        Subject: [bolger] Sneakeasy retractable board?

         

        Have Sneakeasy plans and am thinking of including a retractable board just behind the bow to aid low speed maneuverability in cross winds. I read somewhere that it would be a good idea.

        It doesn't need to be large, so am wondering if a car electric-window- winder setup would be a reliable way to raise and lower it with a switch in the cockpit. I am thinking that it will be shaped like a segment of a circle and rotate about 90 degrees.

        The ones I have seen either use a cable/drum or gearbox/arm setup and have a pretty hard life inside a door so do you think it could work in this application?

        Perhaps it's been done before(?).


      • Brent
        Bow thruster: I find two arms really handy, but I take your point about salt water corrosion! It IS possible that there will be salt water under her hull
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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          Bow thruster: I find two arms really handy, but I take your point about salt water corrosion! It IS possible that there will be salt water under her hull sometimes.

          My original sketch for the board just used a rope and pulley arrangement which is probably the most reliable system.

          The problem with the Sneak is that there isn't anything in the water up near the bow so when there is a breeze she's just "gone with the wind".

          Brent
        • daschultz2000
          I don t quite see why we branched off into bow thrusters for something like Sneakeasy. But, the obvious there is a modified trolling motor that retracts. I
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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            I don't quite see why we branched off into bow thrusters for something like Sneakeasy. But, the obvious there is a modified trolling motor that retracts. I got a nice one at a garage sale for $40 that I use occasionally on my canoe. For limited use in docking situations, you wouldn't need a dedicated deep cycle battery. Just mount it at right angle to the center line of the boat in a well. It could/should dry out at speed. Drop it down during docking. Thrust left or right with fwd and rev controls.

            To me the thruster would be 'cute' on a Sneakeasy, but a much appreciated feature on the 2X sized Wyoming.

            From what I've observed of Bolger placing boards in power boats, they are placed further back, about the widest point of the hull. Look up Wyoming, Minnesota, Dakota, and Illinois. Also "Blackliner" which was built and named Robin Jean, but the first builder left the board out.

            They aren't to large, and the case top is closed because pressure can build while underway. Sneakeasy is a fast boat. The board discussion in the Minnesota essay especially applies.

            Don

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Brent" <brent.kennedy@...> wrote:
            >
            > ...The problem with the Sneak is that there isn't anything in the water up near the bow so when there is a breeze she's just "gone with the wind".
            >
            > Brent
            >
          • sirdarnell
            Why not build the version with the box cutwater?
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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              Why not build the version with the box cutwater?

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Brent" <brent.kennedy@...> wrote:
              >
              > Have Sneakeasy plans and am thinking of including a retractable board just behind the bow to aid low speed maneuverability in cross winds. I read somewhere that it would be a good idea.
              >
              > It doesn't need to be large, so am wondering if a car electric-window-winder setup would be a reliable way to raise and lower it with a switch in the cockpit. I am thinking that it will be shaped like a segment of a circle and rotate about 90 degrees.
              >
              > The ones I have seen either use a cable/drum or gearbox/arm setup and have a pretty hard life inside a door so do you think it could work in this application?
              >
              > Perhaps it's been done before(?).
              >
            • Brent
              Good suggestion thanks. I had looked at that option a while ago, but.... a. I have the plans for the standard sharpie hull. b. From what I have read, the
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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                Good suggestion thanks. I had looked at that option a while ago, but....

                a. I have the plans for the standard sharpie hull.
                b. From what I have read, the benefits of the step-sharpie mod don't outweigh the added complexity of build.
                c. I prefer the appearance of standard hull shape.

                Will read the posts on the Minnesota. Brent


                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "sirdarnell" <sirdarnell@...> wrote:
                >
                > Why not build the version with the box cutwater?
                >
              • Harry James
                I am not sure what problem with docking you are faced with that would be worth the effort and would not cause more problems then you solved. The Sneakeasy is a
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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                  I am not sure what problem with docking you are faced with that would be
                  worth the effort and would not cause more problems then you solved. The
                  Sneakeasy is a small light boat with not much in the water but so is a
                  jon boat and a Lund aluminum skiff. Fritz always made it look easy to
                  handle including the first voyage. I will forward this message and see
                  if he has a comment.

                  HJ

                  Bob Cook wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Do you live (or will the boat be used) near salt water? It has been
                  > my experience that things like that will last about a week around salt
                  > water. Bow thrusters are getting down in cost and size lately. Saw
                  > one the other day that would just cost an arm....so you could at least
                  > walk ashore.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > *From:* Brent <brent.kennedy@...>
                  > *To:* bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  > *Sent:* Sat, February 6, 2010 3:53:50 AM
                  > *Subject:* [bolger] Sneakeasy retractable board?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Have Sneakeasy plans and am thinking of including a retractable board
                  > just behind the bow to aid low speed maneuverability in cross winds. I
                  > read somewhere that it would be a good idea.
                  >
                  > It doesn't need to be large, so am wondering if a car electric-window-
                  > winder setup would be a reliable way to raise and lower it with a
                  > switch in the cockpit. I am thinking that it will be shaped like a
                  > segment of a circle and rotate about 90 degrees.
                  >
                  > The ones I have seen either use a cable/drum or gearbox/arm setup and
                  > have a pretty hard life inside a door so do you think it could work in
                  > this application?
                  >
                  > Perhaps it's been done before(?).
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Brent
                  I am just going on what people like Jim Michaels have said in past posts and emails. Our marina (Northern Tasmania) is subject to winds and strong tidal
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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                    I am just going on what people like Jim Michaels have said in past posts and emails. Our marina (Northern Tasmania) is subject to winds and strong tidal flows, and is rather compact in size.
                    I could just put out the fenders and use the fwd/rev technique Fritz talks about. It wouldn't do any damage as it's so light, but if I think about it before I build I don't have to use it and it's there in case.

                    That's a VERY long bow a long way from the outboard on a Sneak!

                    Brent

                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I am not sure what problem with docking you are faced with that would be
                    > worth the effort and would not cause more problems then you solved.
                    > The Sneakeasy is a small light boat with not much in the water but so is a
                    > jon boat and a Lund aluminum skiff. Fritz always made it look easy to
                    > handle including the first voyage. I will forward this message and see if he has a comment.
                  • Peter
                    ... Brent, The Sneakeasy is so low sided and the chine so hard that I would be very surprised that you would find yourself in a situation whereby you couldn t
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 6, 2010
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                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Brent" <brent.kennedy@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Have Sneakeasy plans and am thinking of including a retractable board just behind the bow to aid low speed maneuverability in cross winds.


                      Brent,

                      The Sneakeasy is so low sided and the chine so hard that I would be very surprised that you would find yourself in a situation whereby you couldn't just power her out of whatever percieved trouble you thought you were getting yourself into with a cross wind.

                      In other words, resist the laudable temptation to complicate things unneccessarily.Afterall,untold thousands of super light weight,outboard powered,aluminium skiffs have been fine without forward centerboards or bow thrusters.Learn to operate your boat,with its' particular handling characteristics and you'll come out ahead in the end.


                      Sincerely,


                      Peter Lenihan
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