Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: New Member Saying Hi

Expand Messages
  • Tom
    Hi, Eric. The man that had it built had a friend that manufactured fiberglass boats. His crew laid up solid panels of fiberglass to form the sides and bottom.
    Message 1 of 22 , Dec 22, 2009
      Hi, Eric. The man that had it built had a friend that manufactured fiberglass boats. His crew laid up solid panels of fiberglass to form the sides and bottom. They used vinylester resin for blister protection. The plywood for the structural bulkheads was put into place and tabbed in. The settees are fiberglass over foam core material to keep the weight down. The galley is there, but I want to rework it and move the cook stove aft towards the hatch and the fridge forward. The sink will be between them. The cabin top is glassed in to the boat on the exterior but needs to be tabbed in on the inside. There are lots of things that need to be done, but most are time consuming but not expensive.

      There are certain things that every boat needs to be a good live-aboard; a pantry, hanging locker, storage, etc. What I have is a great sailing hull that is extremely fun to cruise. What I'm doing is making it a comfortable/functional place to spend a lot of time based on having spent 18 months living with her. There are no "plans". Everything I plan on doing is based on what I've seen in other boats and what I've found to work for me over the years. I lay it out, and then I build it.

      Right now the boat is full of construction stuff and parts removed to do the rework. Its hard to get better pictures until I get her cleaned out. Before I can clean her out, I need a place to store all the stuff. That's what I'm working on now; shop and storage. Its only been a couple of years since I moved ashore, so I'm kinda starting from scratch. I've had rough sawn wood stored for years waiting to have the space to put it to use. I'm almost ready to start.

      I've traveled a lot and have finally found a place I want to stay, but I can't let the boat just die of neglect. I'm going to fix her up and sell her or I'm going to sell her as is, but either way, somebody is going to get a great boat for very little money.

      Tom

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "eric14850" <eric14850@...> wrote:
      >
      > I think you said fiberglass boat. Why? How? (Fiberglass over foam? plywood? Plywood form removed?)
      >
      > It is hard to see what is done and remains to be done on the interior from the couple of pictures, even for someone used to a project like this boat. Describe what has been done.
      >
      > Eric
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomseigler@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Well, I took some pics today and have them posted. So, if you want to see my project boat, go to photos and look at "Island Time".
      > >
      > > Tom
      > >
      > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomseigler@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Once I figure out how to post them, I'll put a few pictures up so everyone can see what the boat looks like now. BTW, I think I told you wrong; the trailer is a '03 Loadmaster that has never been in the water.
      > > >
      > > > When were you in the Bahamas and Key West? We did that trip back in the Winter of '94-95 and were weathered in up at Marsh Harbor for a week. It was kinda funny to watch the anchorage traffic. There was a place that rented pirated movies for like a quarter. Every few hours, dinghies would criss-cross the harbor, in 40 knot winds, trading movies with their neighbors. We had a wind gen so we *had* to watch movies or stop the generator to keep from overcharging.
      > > >
      > > > Tom
      > > >
      > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Foxtown is on the north end of Great Abbaco. We had been anchored at
      > > > > the fish keys and a kid came buy in a runabout after going to see his
      > > > > girlfriend and it was blowing. We called Foxtown on the radio and they
      > > > > sent a boat over to pick him up but his boat kept going air born in the
      > > > > 50 mile per hour norther that was blowing. the next day it had died down
      > > > > and we towed his boat over to him.
      > > > > I am thinking about your boat Tom, I have some other boats to look at
      > > > > since I set up dates to see them on the 8th of Jan.. I'm sure I won't
      > > > > make any decision until after Jan. 15.
      > > > > I anchored west of Christmas tree one time and there were some families
      > > > > building catamarans on the beach. Kinda neat as they were living in
      > > > > tents while building. Thanks Doug
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Tom wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I don't recall Fox Town. Which island is it on? We sailed over from
      > > > > > Key West and entered at Cat Key, but continued on up to Marsh Harbor
      > > > > > to meet up with some friends from Texas. We ended up in Georgetown,
      > > > > > Exumas a couple of months latter. The trip home was shorter and
      > > > > > downwind for the most part. We sailed back to Key West to go back to
      > > > > > work driving the water-taxi. Best job I ever had! We anchored out West
      > > > > > of Christmas Tree to avoid the boat wakes which kept the anchorage on
      > > > > > the Key West side rolling.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > If you find the right owner/builder, you can meet all your
      > > > > > prerequisites for your next boat. We should talk.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Tom
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > > > > Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Tom My Wolftrap drew 27inches with the board up. We anchored at Fox
      > > > > > Town
      > > > > > > Bahamas in 3ft of water to ride out a norther. There were no other
      > > > > > boats
      > > > > > > around to worry about dragging anchor and hitting each other. We
      > > > > > > repeated this may times over a couple years. The biggest problem was
      > > > > > > people wanting to come in and anchor beside us and either calling on
      > > > > > the
      > > > > > > radio and warning them off or helping them get off the bottom.
      > > > > > > I am looking at boats all over to cruise in and maybe live aboard for a
      > > > > > > couple years. Most of the boats I am looking at have medium draft 4to
      > > > > > > 5ft. I really want something with 2ft board up. I am looking to buy for
      > > > > > > $20,000 or under. This means an older boat and at the same time I don't
      > > > > > > want a big project. I have been considering the posibility that I migh
      > > > > > > hire a couple house carpenters and build a boat that is simple enough
      > > > > > > that they with my help and instruction can mostly build it. I still
      > > > > > need
      > > > > > > to do it for $20,000 and that is a problem.
      > > > > > > The real problem right now is, I have not made up my mind what I
      > > > > > want to
      > > > > > > do with a boat and that determins what boat to buy. The questions are,
      > > > > > > do I want to live aboard or just cruise aboard or weekend and vacation
      > > > > > > with periods of several months aboard. I guess I am hoping the act of
      > > > > > > looking at boats will help us make up our minds.
      > > > > > > When I was young I had sailed to Smith island on the Chespeake bay and
      > > > > > > was watching skipjacks sailing into the dock. They sailed up close
      > > > > > > luffed the sails and came to a sudden stop in the slip. I ask the
      > > > > > > skipper on one of the boats how the heck he did that. "Just like all
      > > > > > > of,em does he said." "How is that", I asked. He shook his head and
      > > > > > said,
      > > > > > > You just drop it in the mud. I guess I looked perplexed. He looked at
      > > > > > > the mate and shrugged saying, "The board, the board." I felt pretty
      > > > > > dumb.
      > > > > > > Doug
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Tom wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Doug, she has a track. The fore and aft loads caused by the full
      > > > > > > > battens (the sail is stretched taut) requires a car at the end of
      > > > > > each
      > > > > > > > batten. The original owner used bat cars, which work well, but he
      > > > > > > > didn't buy the bat car track. He used 1" stainless sail track, as
      > > > > > used
      > > > > > > > for normal sail slides; going up worked fine, but coming down
      > > > > > required
      > > > > > > > keeping a little tension on the halyard while flaking the sail into
      > > > > > > > the lazy-jacks.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I spent 3 months sailing the Bahamas in my Southern Cross 31 with a
      > > > > > > > 4.5' draft. That was fun, but I want to take this boat over! Imagine
      > > > > > > > the possibilities with an 18" draft. The Grand Bahama Bank would be
      > > > > > > > especially fun to explore.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > The open transom was so nice. Although I initially was concerned with
      > > > > > > > getting pooped in following seas, the trip from Norfolk down to
      > > > > > Oregon
      > > > > > > > Inlet, NC alleviated that concern. I have a Puffin 8'6" rowing
      > > > > > dinghy.
      > > > > > > > It would nestle up against the transom and made getting jerry jugs of
      > > > > > > > water and fuel, sacks of groceries, and the dog (an 80lb German
      > > > > > > > Shepherd) on board easy.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > The boat is designed for bilge boards, but has a 1200lb swing keel
      > > > > > > > situated 1ft off-center to starboard. It is recessed into a trunk so
      > > > > > > > grounding is not a problem. Actually, since depth sounders don't work
      > > > > > > > below 2', it was great for exploring. We would leave it down about
      > > > > > > > three inches as we worked our way into creeks and inlets. It would
      > > > > > > > stop the boat when it touched bottom; crank it up and try another
      > > > > > > > approach. No problem. The winch arrangement sucked! It was a trailer
      > > > > > > > winch that required going below to crank it. I'll re-engineer that,
      > > > > > > > too. There needs to be a seal (packing gland?) where the cable exits
      > > > > > > > the trunk because at speed, water would get past the rubber hose when
      > > > > > > > the keel was down.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > As a live-aboard, this is a great boat. The square chime gives you so
      > > > > > > > much more volume and easier packing that a rounded chime boat. You
      > > > > > > > don't roll when boat wakes strike you on the beam. The queen size
      > > > > > > > bunk, under the cockpit, is really comfortable. Interior volume is
      > > > > > > > easily as much as a standard 34-36 footer.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > The transom mounted outboard worked great. We used a Yamaha 4-stroke
      > > > > > > > 9.9. It would push us at 6.5 knots burning 1/2 gallon/hour. In areas
      > > > > > > > with large numbers of crab/lobster pots, it is inevitable that you'll
      > > > > > > > catch one occasionally. It was so nice to simply lift the engine and
      > > > > > > > remove the line instead of having to dive over the side and cut it
      > > > > > > > loose from the prop. There was over 2000 hours on the engine when we
      > > > > > > > stopped cruising.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > If you really want one of these to build/finish, let me know.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Tom
      > > > > > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > > > > > > Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@> wrote:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Is your main laced onto the mast, run in a track or use hoops? I
      > > > > > like
      > > > > > > > > the figure eight lacing that Mr. Bolger recommends. As soon as the
      > > > > > > > > halyard is slacked the lacing opens to let the sail drop with no
      > > > > > > > > sticking. Your light pole being tapered might create a problem with
      > > > > > > > > lacing I don't know. Friends I met in the Bahamas had an open
      > > > > > > > transom on
      > > > > > > > > a boat and really liked it and I looked on it with envy. I guess
      > > > > > you
      > > > > > > > saw
      > > > > > > > > the AS 29 or maybe 39 with the twin junk rigs on line, looks nice on
      > > > > > > > > her. the same boat has leeboards. I don't always like their
      > > > > > looks but
      > > > > > > > > somehow look suitable on an AS29 though Bolger recommended
      > > > > > against them
      > > > > > > > > on that boat. IS the centerboard on your boat swing up? I can't
      > > > > > > > remember
      > > > > > > > > if the AS 29 has a centerboard or maybe bilge boards now that I
      > > > > > think
      > > > > > > > > about it. I like the boat a lot and am wanting a live aboard
      > > > > > cruising
      > > > > > > > > boat and am looking to buy one. I haven't been able to find one
      > > > > > to buy
      > > > > > > > > and have concidered building one. Just seems to much a project
      > > > > > at my
      > > > > > > > age
      > > > > > > > > and really just wanting to do some more sailing. I spent a lot
      > > > > > of years
      > > > > > > > > living aboard and really miss it. Keep us informed on your
      > > > > > progress. We
      > > > > > > > > are all interest in boat building repairs and modifications.
      > > > > > > > > Doug
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Tom wrote:
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Doug, I've always been a fan of having multiple smaller sails;
      > > > > > much
      > > > > > > > > > easier to handle ina seaway. Being a delivery skipper gave me the
      > > > > > > > > > opportunity to sail a lot of different rigs, but never a schooner,
      > > > > > > > > > darn it!
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Did I mention the boat has an open stern? That makes it easy
      > > > > > getting
      > > > > > > > > > into and out of the dinghy, but complicates things when it
      > > > > > comes to
      > > > > > > > > > sheeting arrangement. If I place the mast in my selected position
      > > > > > > > > > (roughly 2' aft of the forward cabin bulkhead) the boom end is
      > > > > > just
      > > > > > > > > > forward of the stern. One of the additions I have planned is a
      > > > > > noise
      > > > > > > > > > shield behind which I can mount the outboard. It will also be
      > > > > > used to
      > > > > > > > > > mount a rail system to raise and lower the outboard. I have
      > > > > > thought
      > > > > > > > > > about sheeting the main to that point, as well. That would
      > > > > > require
      > > > > > > > the
      > > > > > > > > > use of a vang/preventer to shape the sail offwind, but would
      > > > > > keep the
      > > > > > > > > > lines clear of the cockpit. Originally, there was a bridge deck
      > > > > > > > > > mainsheet track. Jibing was ... interesting, to say the least.
      > > > > > Almost
      > > > > > > > > > lost the dog once, and it made a dodger to bimini attachment
      > > > > > > > > > impossible. The full-battened main is a great sail. It is
      > > > > > shaped much
      > > > > > > > > > like a catamaran sail with lots of roach.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > The mast is an aluminum flagpole 27' tall (rated to 160 knot
      > > > > > > > winds). I
      > > > > > > > > > want it to remain a tabernacled mast, so I'll be constructing some
      > > > > > > > > > type of tabernacle. Preferably one which will allow the main
      > > > > > to stay
      > > > > > > > > > on the boom when the mast is lowered. We were just North of
      > > > > > > > > > Jacksonville, FL and one of the bridges burned out a motor.
      > > > > > Much to
      > > > > > > > > > the chagrin of the other boats waiting to pass, we simply cranked
      > > > > > > > down
      > > > > > > > > > the mainmast and continued on our way. Nobody was laughing at our
      > > > > > > > > > funny looking boat then.:)
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Tom
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > > > > > > > > Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@> wrote:
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > On My boat Wolf trap I rerigged her as a schooner. I like
      > > > > > > > schooners and
      > > > > > > > > > > ketches! AllmI did was move things around so the center of
      > > > > > > > effort on
      > > > > > > > > > the
      > > > > > > > > > > sails and the center of effort the same place Bolger had
      > > > > > them. I
      > > > > > > > moved
      > > > > > > > > > > the main mast aft and stepped it on deck after cutting some
      > > > > > off the
      > > > > > > > > > > bottom to compensate for the fact that it had been stepped on
      > > > > > > > the keel
      > > > > > > > > > > before. The foremast being shorter I gaff rigged that sail to
      > > > > > > > increase
      > > > > > > > > > > the square footage. It was stepped where the cat rig had been
      > > > > > > > steeped.
      > > > > > > > > > > Might have been a little odd looking to some that far
      > > > > > forward but I
      > > > > > > > > > > liked it. I also provided a sheet to the boom and one to the
      > > > > > end
      > > > > > > > of the
      > > > > > > > > > > gaff to the top of the main mast. I could sheet in the top and
      > > > > > > > bottom
      > > > > > > > > > > correctly so that the sail would draw top and bottom. I
      > > > > > extended the
      > > > > > > > > > > boomkin so the main sheet could sheet to the end of it. Then
      > > > > > > > lengthened
      > > > > > > > > > > the bowsprit by two feet. These changes kept the square footage
      > > > > > > > of the
      > > > > > > > > > > new rig the same size as the old. The original rig had a 300
      > > > > > sq. ft
      > > > > > > > > > flat
      > > > > > > > > > > spinnaker. I used that as a mizzen stay sail or golley
      > > > > > wobler. I
      > > > > > > > would
      > > > > > > > > > > say keep the center of effort the same place and you should be
      > > > > > > > able to
      > > > > > > > > > > move things around any way you want pretty much. If you use
      > > > > > a club
      > > > > > > > > > > footed jib it's self tending plus you can adjust the center of
      > > > > > > > effort
      > > > > > > > > > > for an aft at will, buy how tight you sheet the jib in. If the
      > > > > > > > sail is
      > > > > > > > > > > pulling hard at the to the CE moves aft if its pulling hard
      > > > > > low the
      > > > > > > > > > > effort moves forward, because of the angle of the head stay.
      > > > > > I had
      > > > > > > > > > added
      > > > > > > > > > > in a fair amount of mast rake so I could also change the
      > > > > > center of
      > > > > > > > > > > effort the same way on them. This is why I like a ketch and
      > > > > > > > schooner.
      > > > > > > > > > > They are infanatly adjustable, sort of. I'm sure you can do
      > > > > > the same
      > > > > > > > > > > with the sloop.
      > > > > > > > > > > Doug
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > Tom wrote:
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > I don't know about being an expert, but aside from the
      > > > > > rounding up
      > > > > > > > > > > > part (which only happened in gust), she was very well
      > > > > > behaved. We
      > > > > > > > > > were
      > > > > > > > > > > > on her best point of sail, a broad reach, and had a little
      > > > > > of the
      > > > > > > > > > > > swing keel extended to act as a skeg. The GPS had us
      > > > > > regularly
      > > > > > > > at 9+
      > > > > > > > > > > > knots with a jury-rigged triple-reefed main. I was very
      > > > > > impressed
      > > > > > > > > > with
      > > > > > > > > > > > her lack of motion. All of my previous boats have been
      > > > > > full-keel
      > > > > > > > > > > > cruisers or long-fin with a skeg. They would roll pretty good
      > > > > > > > as the
      > > > > > > > > > > > waves ran under, but "Island Time", she just picked up her
      > > > > > > > skirt and
      > > > > > > > > > > > surfed them! The helm was extremely light, even when she would
      > > > > > > > > > > > round-up. I attribute this to the counter-balanced rudder.
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > At the time we were cruising, we had made no changes to the
      > > > > > > > boat from
      > > > > > > > > > > > its purchased state. I designed the cabin top and planned the
      > > > > > > > other
      > > > > > > > > > > > changes while living with her. She was already something of a
      > > > > > > > > > > > "step-child". The builder had incorporated several of
      > > > > > Bolger's
      > > > > > > > ideas
      > > > > > > > > > > > like the swing keel off of a 34' design and a bowsprit, but
      > > > > > > > there was
      > > > > > > > > > > > no sail or rigging for a spritsail. He had also moved the
      > > > > > > > outboard to
      > > > > > > > > > > > the stern. For a cabin top, he had had the yard, that built
      > > > > > > > the boat
      > > > > > > > > > > > for him, incorporate a domed/slanted front cabin from one
      > > > > > of their
      > > > > > > > > > > > production boats. Did I mention the open stern?
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > When I first saw it, I wasn't sure that my ego would let
      > > > > > me sail
      > > > > > > > > > > > something that looked as funny as this boat did. But I had
      > > > > > a young
      > > > > > > > > > > > trophy wife that thought it was "cute" and a big dog that
      > > > > > > > needed to
      > > > > > > > > > > > get to shore to do his thing; I'm really glad we got it.
      > > > > > We hadn't
      > > > > > > > > > > > planned on being offshore much because of the dog, and for
      > > > > > coastal
      > > > > > > > > > > > cruising the East Coast, I couldn't have asked for a
      > > > > > better boat.
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > Stop me if your getting bored!
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > I'll have to post some pics of her with her new cabin. I
      > > > > > think it
      > > > > > > > > > fits
      > > > > > > > > > > > really well, but I may be prejudiced. I also added a real bow
      > > > > > > > pulpit
      > > > > > > > > > > > to make setting the anchors easier. To blend it in, the
      > > > > > plumb bow
      > > > > > > > > > > > received a cutwater which I glassed in at the same time we
      > > > > > > > added the
      > > > > > > > > > > > insulation panels to the outside of the hull.
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > My thinking is that one doesn't really sail very close to
      > > > > > the wind
      > > > > > > > > > > > when cruising. Besides, the rudder kicks out at around 20
      > > > > > > > degrees of
      > > > > > > > > > > > heel. One of the nice things about the design is that
      > > > > > everything
      > > > > > > > > > > > inside of the gunnels is ballast! When cruising and living
      > > > > > aboard,
      > > > > > > > > > > > there's lots of ballast! So going to a sloop rig, using the
      > > > > > > > original
      > > > > > > > > > > > mast, but adding uppers (no spreaders) and forestay, shouldn't
      > > > > > > > > > require
      > > > > > > > > > > > any additional ballast. Since the sail area will be close
      > > > > > to 500
      > > > > > > > > > sqft,
      > > > > > > > > > > > I might reef a little sooner, but she ought to move well
      > > > > > in light
      > > > > > > > > > airs.
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > My biggest challenge is to situate the mast such that the
      > > > > > > > center of
      > > > > > > > > > > > effort and the center of lateral resistance are correct and
      > > > > > > > still be
      > > > > > > > > > > > able to use the entire 20' of boom and still get a
      > > > > > wind-generator
      > > > > > > > > > > > mounted aft. The hoist on the sail is 24'.
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > Tom
      > > > > > > > > > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > > > > > > > > > > Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@> wrote:
      > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > All I can say Tom, is I suspect you are likely the only
      > > > > > > > person here
      > > > > > > > > > > > that
      > > > > > > > > > > > > has tried sailed an AS 29 in high winds and big seas so that
      > > > > > > > > > makes you
      > > > > > > > > > > > > the expert in those conditions. Anything I have had to say
      > > > > > > > is pure
      > > > > > > > > > > > > speculation. Doug
      > > > > > > > > > > > > the doctor wrote:
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > Won't know unless you try !!!
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > doc
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > --- On *Sun, 12/20/09, Patrick Crockett
      > > > > > /<pcrockett@>/* wrote:
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > From: Patrick Crockett <pcrockett@>
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > Subject: Re: [bolger] New Member Saying Hi
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > > > > <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > Date: Sunday, December 20, 2009, 11:49 AM
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > Wouldn't it be enough to add a bowsprit and small flying
      > > > > > > > jib? I
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > would be
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > nervous making radical changes from a designer's rig
      > > > > > -- in
      > > > > > > > this
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > case I'd
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > worry that a sloop rig would be too tall for the boat,
      > > > > > > > requiring
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > deeper
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > or more ballast and then a whole slew of changes would
      > > > > > ensue.
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > Patrick
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > Tom wrote:
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Hello. Thanks for letting me into your group.
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Let me introduce myself:
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > I own a modified AS 29. It is 32', has an offset
      > > > > > > > swing-keel,
      > > > > > > > > > a full
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > cabin, and is solid fiberglass. When I bought the boat,
      > > > > > > > it was a
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > cat-
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > ketch rig with a full battened, large roach mainsail
      > > > > > and
      > > > > > > > a small
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > sloping cabin. After cruising from the Chesapeake to the
      > > > > > > > > > Keys and
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > living aboard for 18 months, we cut the cabin top
      > > > > > out and
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > constructed
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > one that gives 14' of standing headroom. We also
      > > > > > insulated
      > > > > > > > > > the hull
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > sides with beveled panels of polyurethane foam and
      > > > > > glassed
      > > > > > > > > > over them
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > with four layers of DBM. At that point, I got a
      > > > > > divorce.
      > > > > > > > The
      > > > > > > > > > rework
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > stopped, and I have been dragging the unfinished project
      > > > > > > > > > around for
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > about 4 years. It is now time to finish it.
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > My experience with boats is quite extensive. Over the
      > > > > > > > past 25
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > years, I
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > have lived aboard various boats for 15 years, been a
      > > > > > > > > > professional
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > sailing captain doing yacht deliveries and running
      > > > > > > > corporate
      > > > > > > > > > boats,
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > have worked on both sail and power boats, and managed a
      > > > > > > > > > large yacht
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > repair yard in Seabrook, TX.
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > I'm making several changes to the boat based on the 18
      > > > > > > > months of
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > sailing and living aboard her. The biggest is to re-rig
      > > > > > > > her as a
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > sloop
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > using the original full battened main and adding a
      > > > > > > > headsail for
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > balance. We had her in 35 knot winds out in the
      > > > > > Atlantic
      > > > > > > > and
      > > > > > > > > > found
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > that she wanted to round-up because we couldn't get
      > > > > > enough
      > > > > > > > > > effort
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > forward. In the 8-10 ft seas, that was a little
      > > > > > > > disconcerting.
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > Part of
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > the problem was with the lack of a third reef point in
      > > > > > > > the main,
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > but I
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > think the windage of the mizzen was a contributing
      > > > > > factor
      > > > > > > > > > along with
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > the lack of a headsail. Aside from that little quirk, I
      > > > > > > > love
      > > > > > > > > > the way
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > she sails and so most of the changes are to the interior
      > > > > > > > > > layout and
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > systems.
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > I look forward to sharing whatever information I may
      > > > > > > > have and am
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > open
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > to all suggestions.
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Tom
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.