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Re: long micro nearing completion Thailand new pics

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  • Pat
    In Thailand Australian Red Cedar Is called Mai Yom Horm. I understand from my father in law who has been making pianos in Thailand for 40years and is quite
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 7, 2009
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      In Thailand Australian Red Cedar Is called Mai Yom Horm. I understand from my father in law who has been making pianos in Thailand for 40years and is quite knowledgeable about tropical hardwoods and there uses, that they used this timber to make airplanes during the Second World War. It has a very unique aroma, it is very light strong and flexible. I believe most comes from Malaysia, Lao, Burma and Cambodia these days. It cost approx the same as grade b Teak in Thailand not very expensive as my 2 mast  one 30 feet long the other 15 feet cost 200us$ for the  wood.
       
      Cheers
      PAT
       
      Toona ciliata M. Roem.

      SYNONYM(S) :  Cedrela australis R.Mudie,  Cedrela toona Roxb. ex. Rottler,  Cedrela toona Roxb. ex Willd.,  Cedrela velutina DC., Toona australis F. Muell., Toona australis (F. Muell.) Harms, Toona ciliata M. Roem. var. australis (F. Muell.) K.N. Bahadur, Toona microcarpa (C. DC.) Harms

      BENGALI :      Tuun (Tun), Tuni.

      BURMESE :  Mai yom horm, Taung tama, Taw thamgo, Thit kador .

      CHINESE :  红椿  Hong chun,  小果红椿    Xiao guo hong chun (as T. microcarpa).

      ENGLISH :   Australian cedar, Australian red cedar, Australian cedar, Burma cedar, Burma toon, Harms red cedar, Indian mahogany, Moulmein cedar (Myanmar), Queensland red cedar (Aust.), Red cedar, Toon.

      FRENCH :   C�e rouge, C�e rouge d'Australie.

      GERMAN :  Australisches mahagoni, Australisches Zeder.

    • Paul & Susanne
      As a resident of British Columbia, I humbly beg to differ; red cedar was the primary wood for native dug out canoes in the northwest. The larger, ocean going
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 7, 2009
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        As a resident of British Columbia, I humbly beg to differ; red cedar was the primary wood for native dug out canoes in the northwest.  The larger, ocean going ones were built up to 50-60 feet in length.  Although old, first-growth cedars grew to great dimensions, a canoe could be considerably wider in beam than the diameter of the log it was carved from.  After hollowing out, the shell would be filled with water.  Than rocks heated in a fire would be put into the water to soften the hull.  Gradually longer thwarts would be worked in spreading the gunwales and creating flare in the topsides.  You are correct that western read cedar can be quite soft on the surface.  The native people dealt with that by 'fire hardening' and by treatment with shark oil.  I remember reading that the ultimate shape of the large sea going canoes was very like that arrrived at by 19th century ship builders for the great clipper ships.
         
        Paul Glassen
        Nanaimo
        Vancouver Island
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, September 07, 2009 1:36 AM
        Subject: [SPAM]Re: [bolger] Re: long micro nearing completion Thailand new pics

         

        Western Red is pretty soft, some say to soft even for planking unless
        used in conjunction with epoxies.

        Two fine cedars for boatbuilding are Port Orford cedar and Alaska
        Yellow cedar. They'd both make great spars.

        Port Orford is from Southern Oregon and N. California and is prized
        for planking and Spars. It was often used in Greene and Greene
        craftsman style houses for paneling, beams, and carved trim. Great
        wood blond in color and straight tight grain. - kind of expensive
        now. I have some salvage first growth beams waiting for an
        appropriate project.

        Alaska yellow cedar is the hardest of the cedars, grown up the West
        coast starting in Washington State (though it's mostly gone in
        Washington, now commercially. ) Also a great wood, straight and tight
        grain with no checking or splitting. Often totem poles and native
        log canoes were made from it.

        Both would make great spars for a small boat.

        Larry

        On Sep 6, 2009, at 8:18 PM, scsbmsjoe wrote:

        > Graeme
        >
        > Douglas Fir, also called Oregon Pine, is quite different from Red
        > Cedar. Douglas Fir is used for spars though Sitka Spruce is lighter
        > weight and prefered for spars on small boats in the US.
        >
        > Joe T
        >

      • scsbmsjoe
        All good info here. I was hoping to bring out some experts fron the NW US. Thanks. Joe T
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 7, 2009
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          All good info here. I was hoping to bring out some experts fron the NW US. Thanks.

          Joe T

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Paul & Susanne" <glassens@...> wrote:
          >
          > As a resident of British Columbia, I humbly beg to differ; red cedar was the primary wood for native dug out canoes in the northwest. The larger, ocean going ones were built up to 50-60 feet in length. Although old, first-growth cedars grew to great dimensions, a canoe could be considerably wider in beam than the diameter of the log it was carved from. After hollowing out, the shell would be filled with water. Than rocks heated in a fire would be put into the water to soften the hull. Gradually longer thwarts would be worked in spreading the gunwales and creating flare in the topsides. You are correct that western read cedar can be quite soft on the surface. The native people dealt with that by 'fire hardening' and by treatment with shark oil. I remember reading that the ultimate shape of the large sea going canoes was very like that arrrived at by 19th century ship builders for the great clipper ships.
          >
          > Paul Glassen
          > Nanaimo
          > Vancouver Island
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Larry Geib
          > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Monday, September 07, 2009 1:36 AM
          > Subject: [SPAM]Re: [bolger] Re: long micro nearing completion Thailand new pics
          >
          >
          > Western Red is pretty soft, some say to soft even for planking unless
          > used in conjunction with epoxies.
          >
          > Two fine cedars for boatbuilding are Port Orford cedar and Alaska
          > Yellow cedar. They'd both make great spars.
          >
          > Port Orford is from Southern Oregon and N. California and is prized
          > for planking and Spars. It was often used in Greene and Greene
          > craftsman style houses for paneling, beams, and carved trim. Great
          > wood blond in color and straight tight grain. - kind of expensive
          > now. I have some salvage first growth beams waiting for an
          > appropriate project.
          >
          > Alaska yellow cedar is the hardest of the cedars, grown up the West
          > coast starting in Washington State (though it's mostly gone in
          > Washington, now commercially.) Also a great wood, straight and tight
          > grain with no checking or splitting. Often totem poles and native
          > log canoes were made from it.
          >
          > Both would make great spars for a small boat.
          >
          > Larry
          >
          > On Sep 6, 2009, at 8:18 PM, scsbmsjoe wrote:
          >
          > > Graeme
          > >
          > > Douglas Fir, also called Oregon Pine, is quite different from Red
          > > Cedar. Douglas Fir is used for spars though Sitka Spruce is lighter
          > > weight and prefered for spars on small boats in the US.
          > >
          > > Joe T
          > >
          >
        • graeme19121984
          ... So then Pat, did you clear finish the spars for your beautiful Micro? Probably a very nice colour contrast, hey? Graeme
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 9, 2009
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            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Pat <patjah@...> wrote:
            >
            > In Thailand Australian Red Cedar Is called Mai Yom Horm.

            So then Pat, did you clear finish the spars for your beautiful Micro? Probably a very nice colour contrast, hey?

            Graeme
          • Pat
            So then Pat, did you clear finish the spars for your beautiful Micro? Probably a very nice colour contrast, hey? I tried to keep the bright work to a minimum.
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 10, 2009
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              So then Pat, did you clear finish the spars for your beautiful Micro? Probably a very nice colour contrast, hey?
               
              I tried to keep the bright work to a minimum. Just cockpit combing hatches. tiller ect.. I was tempted to but rather be sailing than sanding.I did use it a bit on the intrerior. Realy nice wood to work with and it smells like sandalwood.
              I have enjoyed building this boat so much the sailing will be icing on the cake.
               
              Cheers
              PAT
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