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Re: legality of building from study plans, Was: [bolger] Peero

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  • pvanderwaart
    ... The legalities and practicalities of plans have been discussed a lot over the years, in this forum and others. In particular, Mr. Bolger s later books
    Message 1 of 31 , Aug 4, 2009
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      > In the jacket liner of Small Boats " Though this is in part
      > a dreamers book , it is eminently practical. There are
      > enough plans and specifications here to build every boat
      > discussed - all 31 of them.

      The legalities and practicalities of plans have been discussed a lot over the years, in this forum and others. In particular, Mr. Bolger's later books don't all have the same approach as Small Boats.

      Quite aside from the legal issues, there is the business model (to use a pretentious term) being pursued by the designer. It is my impression that for a long time, Mr. Bolger took the point of view that an "unlicensed" copy of an amateur-built boat (i.e. one built from plans not paid for) didn't cost him much. The boat probably would not have been built if the the builder had been forced to pay for the plans, and the downside of no fee was partly balanced by the upside of some advertising value. He also sold small boat plans to amateurs at prices below what any MBA would have told him was a proper cost. These efforts did not earn him a ton a money in the short term, but did help build his enormous following and brought him many custom commissions.

      When he put the full plans in a book, he apparently took the view that if you paid for the book, you could build the boats. Or at least, he never contradicted that view as far as I know.

      To take a specific example, consider the Teal. I doubt he got a fee or compensation of any sort for a tenth of the Teals ever built, but it was a winning proposition for him.
    • apraphett777
      I paddle mostly been in power boats most of my life pulling crab pots where the chesapeake and the intercoastal intersect I am about at mile 3 I don,t cartop
      Message 31 of 31 , Aug 12, 2009
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        I paddle mostly been in power boats most of my life pulling crab pots where the chesapeake and the intercoastal intersect I am about at mile 3 I don,t cartop just carry the boat down to the water here lately I have been lazy I built a small dolley to tote my canoe with. It is a old battered coleman , I was just building smaller boats with hopes of finding something lighter I am aprox 205-210 pounds most weeks I have built a coupla of peeros for neices and nephews a nieghborhood kid or 2 they do well in them . It don,t do to have a adult beverage or two with you and paying attention really pays off :)

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kearney" <rdkearney_99@...> wrote:
        >
        > Also, once you start messing around with the dimensions, you have
        > to ask yourself what your real purpose of use is. Do you want a craft
        > that's mainly sailed and occasionally paddled or vice-versa since
        > dimensions that enhance one use may detract from the other. To me,
        > with the current dimensions, this design looks like it might be a fair
        > compromise between paddling and sailing for someone up to about 180
        > lbs. At 11'6" it's probably going to be pretty easy to car-top but
        > at that length, it sure isn't going to be any speed demon. I agree
        > that just raising the sides to gain more freeboard to carry more
        > weight will introduce some negatives.
        >
        > - Rob
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "graeme19121984" <graeme19121984@> wrote:
        > >
        > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kearney" <rdkearney_99@> wrote:
        > > >I wonder if would work better for you if it was
        > > > stretched out to about 15.5' and widened about 2". I'm still kind of
        > > > amazed that a mono-hull with a 2' beam can be successfully sailed but
        > > > then I used to feel that way about sailing canoes in general.
        > >
        > > That could do it as higher sides mean crew weight higher for double paddle use - higher, and... oops over we go! The low sides also allow leaning the upper body out to the side. The Eeek! has higher sides, but also lead ballast stability (and some prefer a single paddle). Bolger said it was unerving though, that, when paddling, you had to lie back prone quickly when you reflexively wanted to lean out as capsize threatened. Isn't bracing meant to save this situation?
        > >
        > > Graeme
        > >
        >
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