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Hatch Seals

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  • adventures_in_astrophotography
    I ve always used hardware store weather stripping to make a seal underneath shop-built hatches. Home Depot even sells one for marine and RV use, so I ve put
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 6, 2009
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      I've always used hardware store weather stripping to make a seal underneath shop-built hatches. Home Depot even sells one for "marine and RV" use, so I've put that on the last couple of boats I completed. We just got done with a two-night camping trip to test out a modified drift boat I did like this, and after leaving the boat in the sun for most of three days, the weather stripping had glued itself to the underside of the hatches. It took a great deal of strength to rip the hatches open when it was time to pack up for the return.

      Has anyone else had this problem, and is there something better to use for making relatively watertight hatch seals?

      Jon Kolb
      www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
    • Gene Tehansky
      Jon, Could this problem be dependent on the type of paint the seal rides on. Some plastics act as solvents to some paints, or is it some paints act as
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 6, 2009
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        Jon,
        Could this problem be dependent on the type of paint the seal rides on.  Some plastics act as solvents to some paints, or is it some paints act as solvents to some plastics.  Similar to the problem of the print from plastic store bags transfering to waterbase paints left in contact with them when least desired.  If we knew which paints were the most stable then hatch seal areas could be painted with that.

        Sincerely,
        Gene T.

        On 6 Jul, 2009, at 3:59 PM, adventures_in_astrophotography wrote:



        I've always used hardware store weather stripping to make a seal underneath shop-built hatches. Home Depot even sells one for "marine and RV" use, so I've put that on the last couple of boats I completed. We just got done with a two-night camping trip to test out a modified drift boat I did like this, and after leaving the boat in the sun for most of three days, the weather stripping had glued itself to the underside of the hatches. It took a great deal of strength to rip the hatches open when it was time to pack up for the return.

        Has anyone else had this problem, and is there something better to use for making relatively watertight hatch seals?

        Jon Kolb
        www.kolbsadventures .com/boatbuildin g_index.htm


      • John Bagshaw
        Jon: Yes. I blamed the paint. The problem is the gasket material is too soft and heat makes this worse. Here in Florida even car gaskets melt in the sun. I
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 6, 2009
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          Jon: Yes. I blamed the paint. The problem is the gasket material is too soft and heat makes this worse. Here in Florida even car gaskets melt in the sun. I think I will cut a groove next time and use a hard rubber gasket to reduce this problem, next time. Jcb.

          --- On Mon, 7/6/09, adventures_in_astrophotography <jon@...> wrote:

          From: adventures_in_astrophotography <jon@...>
          Subject: [bolger] Hatch Seals
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, July 6, 2009, 3:59 PM

          I've always used hardware store weather stripping to make a seal underneath shop-built hatches. Home Depot even sells one for "marine and RV" use, so I've put that on the last couple of boats I completed. We just got done with a two-night camping trip to test out a modified drift boat I did like this, and after leaving the boat in the sun for most of three days, the weather stripping had glued itself to the underside of the hatches. It took a great deal of strength to rip the hatches open when it was time to pack up for the return.

          Has anyone else had this problem, and is there something better to use for making relatively watertight hatch seals?

          Jon Kolb
          www.kolbsadventures .com/boatbuildin g_index.htm


        • briggs monteith
          I ve used stuff generically called sponge rubber as gaskets on elvstrom type bailers on the bottom of racing dinghies and have had them stay leak free for up
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 7, 2009
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            I've used stuff generically called sponge rubber as gaskets on elvstrom type bailers on the bottom of racing dinghies and have had them stay leak free for up to 5 years! you can buy the stuff in sheets or in strips, cutting it out of a sheet woud be more watertight I think. I've stored these dinghies in the back yard with the sun baking on them and have never had an issue. If interested contact your local rubber supplier (locally, I use Firestone).
            Hope this helps, Briggs Monteith

            --- On Mon, 7/6/09, Gene Tehansky <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:

            From: Gene Tehansky <goldranger02-boats@...>
            Subject: Re: [bolger] Hatch Seals
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, July 6, 2009, 4:35 PM

            Jon,
            Could this problem be dependent on the type of paint the seal rides on.  Some plastics act as solvents to some paints, or is it some paints act as solvents to some plastics.  Similar to the problem of the print from plastic store bags transfering to waterbase paints left in contact with them when least desired.  If we knew which paints were the most stable then hatch seal areas could be painted with that.

            Sincerely,
            Gene T.

            On 6 Jul, 2009, at 3:59 PM, adventures_in_ astrophotography wrote:



            I've always used hardware store weather stripping to make a seal underneath shop-built hatches. Home Depot even sells one for "marine and RV" use, so I've put that on the last couple of boats I completed. We just got done with a two-night camping trip to test out a modified drift boat I did like this, and after leaving the boat in the sun for most of three days, the weather stripping had glued itself to the underside of the hatches. It took a great deal of strength to rip the hatches open when it was time to pack up for the return.

            Has anyone else had this problem, and is there something better to use for making relatively watertight hatch seals?

            Jon Kolb
            www.kolbsadventures .com/boatbuildin g_index.htm



          • Bruce Hallman
            I missed the original message in this thread, but I notice that Bolger has used and reused a standard detail for his sliding hatches which I am guessing is
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 7, 2009
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              I missed the original message in this thread, but I notice that Bolger
              has used and reused a standard detail for his sliding hatches which I
              am guessing is based on some traditional design. I am not sure that I
              fully understand this hatch, but it manages to catch the drips and
              keep them out of the cabin. In BWAOM, see for instance the cabin
              hatch on SuperBrick, with the note 46 on the building key saying
              "Sliding hatch with rain shroud. Space under shroud should drain in
              all directions."
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