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Looking for information on Thorfinn Class Cruisers

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  • agnias@ymail.com
    In the seventies Bolger designed a 47-52 feet class cruiser that he called Thorfinn for an Icelandic company.
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 2, 2009
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      In the seventies Bolger designed a 47-52 feet class cruiser that he called "Thorfinn " for an Icelandic company.  There were 2 boats built and I am looking for their current whereabouts.  My late father had the idea to build the boats, and was in charge of the project.

      The first boat was built in Iceland in 1973 and was named "Berserkr".  It got damaged when being unloaded from a ship in Norfolk, VA.  1976 it was finally repaired and sailed to Miami where it was sold in 1978.  1993 it was last spotted in Southern Florida at a police impound lot.

      The second boat was built in Holland in 1974-75 and sold to a Canadian, Robert Hartog, which kept it on the great lakes.  Approximately 2 years ago (2006-2007) it was sold to a new owner.  I do not know the name of the new owner.

      I would be interested to know where the boats are located today, if they are still running, and any current pictures of them.

      Agni Asgeirsson.
    • Bill
      Agni, I checked the US Coast Guard registry http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st1/CoastGuard/VesselByName.html and searched for Berserkr. Nothing. There are
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 3, 2009
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        Agni,
        I checked the US Coast Guard registry
        http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st1/CoastGuard/VesselByName.html
        and searched for "Berserkr." Nothing. There are three ships
        registered as "Berserker" but none match the dimensions of a
        Thorfinn. I cannot search the database by owner name.

        Registration with the US Coast Guard is NOT mandatory, and boats under a certain length (30 feet? Somewhere around there) cannot be registered. So the USCG database is not the definitive list of boats in the US.

        Sorry I couldn't help more. I enjoy a good mystery.
        Bill, Long Micro Pugnacious

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "agnias@..." <agnias@...> wrote:
        >
        > In the seventies Bolger designed a 47-52 feet class cruiser that he
        > called "Thorfinn <http://agnias.googlepages.com/thorfinn> " for an
        > Icelandic company. There were 2 boats built and I am looking for their
        > current whereabouts. My late father had the idea to build the boats,
        > and was in charge of the project.
        >
        > The first boat was built in Iceland in 1973 and was named "Berserkr".
        > It got damaged when being unloaded from a ship in Norfolk, VA. 1976 it
        > was finally repaired and sailed to Miami where it was sold in 1978.
        > 1993 it was last spotted in Southern Florida at a police impound lot.
        >
        > The second boat was built in Holland in 1974-75 and sold to a Canadian,
        > Robert Hartog, which kept it on the great lakes. Approximately 2 years
        > ago (2006-2007) it was sold to a new owner. I do not know the name of
        > the new owner.
        >
        > I would be interested to know where the boats are located today, if they
        > are still running, and any current pictures of them.
        >
        > Agni Asgeirsson.
        >
      • John Kohnen
        Boats under 5 net tons can t be documented. For some uses boats must be documented, but for pleasure boats it s optional, but often encouraged by lenders.
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 3, 2009
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          Boats under 5 net tons can't be "documented." For some uses boats must be
          documented, but for pleasure boats it's optional, but often encouraged by
          lenders. The register tonnage has nothing to do with weight, or even
          capacity. It started out centuries ago as the number of wine casks, or
          "tuns," a ship could carry, but soon degenerated into an imaginary number
          derived from arbitrary measurements using an arcane formula. The formulas
          has changed over the years, but it still doesn't have anything to do with
          weight or capacity. <sigh>

          The Canadian equivalent of the US documentation database is:

          http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/saf-sec-sur/4/vrqs-srib/m.aspx?lang=e

          If Agni knows the name of the Canadian Thorfinn he might find her there.


          On Fri, 03 Jul 2009 05:31:20 -0700, Bill wrote:

          > Agni,
          > I checked the US Coast Guard registry
          > http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st1/CoastGuard/VesselByName.html
          > ...
          > Registration with the US Coast Guard is NOT mandatory, and boats under a
          > certain length (30 feet? Somewhere around there) cannot be registered.
          > So the USCG database is not the definitive list of boats in the US.
          > ...

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
          temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. <Benjamin
          Franklin>
        • agnias@ymail.com
          Thank you for the tips. Unfortunately I do not know the given name of either of the boats. The first one was 47 feet long, but the second one 52 feet long. I
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 9, 2009
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            Thank you for the tips.  Unfortunately I do not know the given name of either of the boats.

            The first one was 47 feet long,  but the second one 52 feet long.

            I did add more pictures the boats here .


            Agni

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "John Kohnen" <jhkohnen@...> wrote:
            >
            > Boats under 5 net tons can't be "documented." For some uses boats must be
            > documented, but for pleasure boats it's optional, but often encouraged by
            > lenders. The register tonnage has nothing to do with weight, or even
            > capacity. It started out centuries ago as the number of wine casks, or
            > "tuns," a ship could carry, but soon degenerated into an imaginary number
            > derived from arbitrary measurements using an arcane formula. The formulas
            > has changed over the years, but it still doesn't have anything to do with
            > weight or capacity. <sigh>
            >
            > The Canadian equivalent of the US documentation database is:
            >
            > http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/saf-sec-sur/4/vrqs-srib/m.aspx?lang=e
            >
            > If Agni knows the name of the Canadian Thorfinn he might find her there.
            >
            >
            > On Fri, 03 Jul 2009 05:31:20 -0700, Bill wrote:
            >
            > > Agni,
            > > I checked the US Coast Guard registry
            > > http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st1/CoastGuard/VesselByName.html
            > > ...
            > > Registration with the US Coast Guard is NOT mandatory, and boats under a
            > > certain length (30 feet? Somewhere around there) cannot be registered.
            > > So the USCG database is not the definitive list of boats in the US.
            > > ...
            >
            > --
            > John jkohnen@...
            > They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
            > temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. <Benjamin
            > Franklin>
            >
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