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Re: encapsulation

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  • Jon & Wanda(Tink)
    The biggest problem I see with this system is the voids that are in all ACX plywood. Voids are the #1 thing that hold water and cause plywood to seperate as
    Message 1 of 84 , Jun 23, 2009
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      The biggest problem I see with this system is the voids that are in all ACX plywood. Voids are the #1 thing that hold water and cause plywood to seperate as well as a place for condensation with just moisture in the ply. 20 Oz cloth on the outside should be plenty heavy. The 5 oz.Dynell could be easly replaced with 2 layers of 6 oz. glass and save epoxy. Dynell ues 3 times the epoxy as glass just to wet out. For a small puncture the foam core needs to have a greater inpact to get through the ply. once through it localy stops the water by being closed cell. You know when it is a hard inpact and keep floating so you can pull the boat dry out and fix. Add to that the insalation factor to reduce condensation on the inside of a cabin. No fear here.

      Jon

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Larkin" <boblark@...> wrote:
      >
      > Mason, many thanks for sharing your experience. I read your comments a couple of times, as they have much to think about.
      >
      > Here is a related item for everyone's contemplation. The Birdwatcher II differs from the original in the use of foam sheeting laminates. The most complex layering occurs in the bottom, and I have posted a cross-section of this at
      > http://www.proaxis.com/~boblark/bw2_bottom2.jpg
      > (If Yahoo adds spaces inside this, remove them to make the URL work). I can't count the number of places water could hide out if it could get in. This "modern" construction has many benefits, but is it a good idea?? Extending this, isn't it just begging the bigger question, "Is plywood a good idea?"
      >
      > I keep the dings repaired as they occur. I have the boat in the water no more than 2-weeks at a time, and it is under a roof cover when out. So, I doubt I will see problems for a long time, but the construction method is intended for much wetter situations. Lucky people get to have a boat in the water a lot!
      >
      > Just to think about.
      >
      > Bob
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "mason smith" <goodboat@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I started this encapuslation thread so let me chime in here with what I meant. Coating and sheathing major hull parts on the outside is not encapsulation, and in plywood boat bottoms and chines I am all for it. With fir ply, I would sheathe the topsides too. My question was really about other topside and inside parts. --snip
      >
    • Jon & Wanda(Tink)
      I should add to this silver chloride is what is used in old photography it is photo turning purple then dark brown. It will stain you skin untill it wears off
      Message 84 of 84 , Jun 25, 2009
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        I should add to this silver chloride is what is used in old photography it is photo turning purple then dark brown. It will stain you skin untill it wears off thd is poisonous to you. It is also a salt so bonding is not as good.

        Jon

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jon & Wanda(Tink)" <windyjon@...> wrote:
        >
        > Salt added or clorinated water would produce silver cloride untill the chlorin is used up.
        >
        > Jon
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