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Re: Munro Hull Form

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  • Bob Johnson
    The rounded chine sharpie form that Commodore Ralph Munroe developed was epitomized in his Presto and to this day most will refer to the form as a
    Message 1 of 11 , May 2, 2009
      The rounded chine sharpie form that Commodore Ralph Munroe developed
      was epitomized in his "Presto" and to this day most will refer to the
      form as a Presto-style hull. Bolger's "Presto Cruiser" was designed
      for the editor of Small Boat Journal Dennis Caprio, and is described in
      chapter 50, page 257, of _Boats with an Open Mind_. There is a pretty
      succinct description of just what Munroe did to arrive at the Presto
      design. (Egret was an earlier hard chined double ended sharpie that
      was famous for its seaworthiness.) In addition to the two books
      mentioned previously (_The Commodores Story_ and _The Good Little
      Ship_) information about Presto-style designs may be found in the
      writings of the following:

      Pete Culler: Pete designed two large cruising boats after Munroe; one a
      Presto-style and the other based on Wabun (which was Vince Gilpin's
      boat). They are described in the John Burke book _Pete Culler's Boats_.

      Dave Gerr: Dave has a chapter on Presto in his book _The Nature of
      Boats_.

      Reuel Parker: Reuel has designed many large Presto-styled hulls and
      they may be seen at his web site and some in his book _The New Cold
      Molded Boat Building_.

      Henry Howard: Howard had a large Presto-styled yacht built and cruised
      extensively and all is described in the book _The Yacht Alice_.

      ---
      Bob

      > 1a. Munro Hull Form
      > Posted by: "Christopher Wetherill" wetherillc@...
      > wetherillc
      > Date: Fri May 1, 2009 10:40 am ((PDT))
      >
      > In the write-up for Blacgauntlet II in The Folding Schooner, PCB
      > presents a version using the "form that Commodore Ralph Munro evolved
      > out of the working sharpie". Is there somewhere a description of how
      > this form can be developed for a given hull?
      >
      > CCW
    • oarmandt
      I read The Commodore s Story years ago after borrowing a copy via inter-library loan. I can recommend both the book and the procedure. Inter-library loan
      Message 2 of 11 , May 2, 2009
        I read "The Commodore's Story" years ago after borrowing a copy via inter-library loan. I can recommend both the book and the procedure. Inter-library loan gives you access to uncommon, out of print books for the price of postage.

        The Commodore's Story has a good bit of description of the development of the sharpie/presto style for work and cruising boats in the Florida shallows. There are some period pictures of the commodore's various boats. It was also amusing for its description of the very earliest days of Miami, as opposed to what it has become.

        Doug

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Roger Padvorac" <roger@...> wrote:
        >
        > I took a look and this book sounds pretty interesting. There is 1 review (5 stars) on Amazon.com for the 3rd edition:
        > "If you are interested in Commadore Ralph Monroe and his Biscayne Bay Sharpies, this is a must have book! The chapter on the seaworthyness of shoal draft boats is worth the price of the book. The style reminds me of Hershoff's Compleat Cruiser, with Florida pioneer twist."
        >
        > Also, it looks like the 3rd edition might be the summation of many decades of Vincent Gilpin's interest in this type of boat.
        >
        > 1st edition 1952
        > 2nd edition 1961
        >
        > Good Little Ship by Vincent Gilpin (Hardcover - Jul 1975) used from $24
        > Hardcover: 64 pages
        > Publisher: Sutter House; 3 edition (July 1975)
        > Language: English
        > ISBN-10: 0915180014
        > ISBN-13: 978-0915180011
        > Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.6 inches
        > Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
        >
        > Another book showed in up the search "The Commodore's Story" by Ralph Middleton Munroe & Vincent Gilpin, but used copies cost over $100, so for reading about the ship itself, "Good Little Ship" sounds like a better starting point.
        >
        > Roger
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "c o'donnell" <dadadata@...>
        > To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 2:56 PM
        > Subject: Re: [bolger] Munro Hull Form
        >
        >
        > > See Vincent Gilpin's book "Good Little Ship".
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Jay K. Jeffries
        A copy of The Commodore s Story can be ordered from the Historical Museum of South Florida for $14.95 + $3.00 shipping and handling. Go to the following URL:
        Message 3 of 11 , May 2, 2009
          A copy of The Commodore's Story can be ordered from the Historical Museum of
          South Florida for $14.95 + $3.00 shipping and handling. Go to the following
          URL:



          http://www.hmsf.org/collections-books-music.htm



          R/Jay



          Jay K. Jeffries

          Andros Is., Bahamas


          Ave the whales.collect the whole series







          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          oarmandt
          Sent: Saturday, May 02, 2009 3:36 PM
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [bolger] Re: Munro Hull Form








          I read "The Commodore's Story" years ago after borrowing a copy via
          inter-library loan. I can recommend both the book and the procedure.
          Inter-library loan gives you access to uncommon, out of print books for the
          price of postage.

          The Commodore's Story has a good bit of description of the development of
          the sharpie/presto style for work and cruising boats in the Florida
          shallows. There are some period pictures of the commodore's various boats.
          It was also amusing for its description of the very earliest days of Miami,
          as opposed to what it has become.

          Doug

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> , "Roger
          Padvorac" <roger@...> wrote:
          >
          > I took a look and this book sounds pretty interesting. There is 1 review
          (5 stars) on Amazon.com for the 3rd edition:
          > "If you are interested in Commadore Ralph Monroe and his Biscayne Bay
          Sharpies, this is a must have book! The chapter on the seaworthyness of
          shoal draft boats is worth the price of the book. The style reminds me of
          Hershoff's Compleat Cruiser, with Florida pioneer twist."
          >
          > Also, it looks like the 3rd edition might be the summation of many decades
          of Vincent Gilpin's interest in this type of boat.
          >
          > 1st edition 1952
          > 2nd edition 1961
          >
          > Good Little Ship by Vincent Gilpin (Hardcover - Jul 1975) used from $24
          > Hardcover: 64 pages
          > Publisher: Sutter House; 3 edition (July 1975)
          > Language: English
          > ISBN-10: 0915180014
          > ISBN-13: 978-0915180011
          > Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.6 inches
          > Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
          >
          > Another book showed in up the search "The Commodore's Story" by Ralph
          Middleton Munroe & Vincent Gilpin, but used copies cost over $100, so for
          reading about the ship itself, "Good Little Ship" sounds like a better
          starting point.
          >
          > Roger
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "c o'donnell" <dadadata@...>
          > To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> >
          > Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 2:56 PM
          > Subject: Re: [bolger] Munro Hull Form
          >
          >
          > > See Vincent Gilpin's book "Good Little Ship".
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Peter Belenky
          ... Alice was modeled on Carib, one of Munroe s last boats. Almost a Presto, but not quite-- a slight variant of the type, as Gilpin described it. The
          Message 4 of 11 , May 4, 2009
            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bob Johnson <dredbob@...> wrote:
            >
            > Henry Howard: Howard had a large Presto-styled yacht built and cruised
            > extensively and all is described in the book _The Yacht Alice_.

            Alice was modeled on Carib, one of Munroe's last boats. Almost a Presto, but not quite--"a slight variant of the type," as Gilpin described it. The difference was that Alice and Carib, although centerboarders, had substantial deadrise. True Presto boats, like sharpies, have flat floors. By lowering the flat bottom of a sharpie and rounding the chines, Munroe was able to increase the displacement, ballast, and stability for a minimal addition to draft and wetted surface.
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