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Re: [bolger] Re: Wood topsides?

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  • Doug Pollard
    ... I see nothing wrong with taking a hull and adding a wood topsides I also see no advantage except that with a hull you already have a good start. You will
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 25, 2009
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      David Darnell wrote:
      >
      >
      > If you mean cabin out of wood, then this could work well. You can make
      > a strong cabin with less weight out of wood than FRG. Make sure your
      > hull is not full of water in the laminate and add one of the epoxy
      > coatings to the hull designed to prevent osmosis. Epoxy encapsulating
      > the cabin would make the wood and paint last longer.
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > "highoveryou" <highoveryou@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > I was looking around at some early fiberglass boats, and came across
      > MFG's, and Tollycraft. Tollycraft glassed a wood hull, but MFG used a
      > glass hull with a wood topside, and that got me to thinking...
      > >
      > > How many folks here have used an older fiberglass hull, and made
      > their own topside. I see a lot of glass hulls free/cheap that this
      > might work on, and produce some nice results (although some might
      > cringe at the thought). A lot of the 50-60's glass hulls even have the
      > lapstrake design.
      > >
      >
      >
      I see nothing wrong with taking a hull and adding a wood topsides I also
      see no advantage except that with a hull you already have a good start.
      You will have a hard time giving the boat away though much less sell it.
      As far as I know the main reason the manufactuing boat builders did
      it was because they built the hull molds on year and over several years
      recouped their costs and built the topside molds and started into
      production with a fully fiberglass boat. The sold all kinds of
      theories why the glass hull and wood topsides were great during those
      years. When a wooden boat rots away 9 0utof 10 times the topsides
      leaked and rotted the hull. I would glass those topsides against
      leaking. You won't loose the hull to rot but even worse you will loose
      the interior. There is where a heck of a lot of the boat building is.
      It seems to me a better deal might be to take a glass topsides and build
      a wooden hull under it??

      Doug
    • Paul Esterle
      I wrote an article on this very subject several years ago. I just posted it, along with some sketches, to www.thevirualboatyard.com. Enjoy! Paul Esterle
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 25, 2009
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        I wrote an article on this very subject several years ago. I just posted
        it, along with some sketches, to www.thevirualboatyard.com.

        Enjoy!
        Paul Esterle
        Freelance Boating Writer
        "Capt'n Pauley's Place"
        The Virtual Boatyard
        www.thevirtualboatyard.com


        highoveryou wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > I was looking around at some early fiberglass boats, and came across
        > MFG's, and Tollycraft. Tollycraft glassed a wood hull, but MFG used a
        > glass hull with a wood topside, and that got me to thinking...
        >
        > How many folks here have used an older fiberglass hull, and made their
        > own topside. I see a lot of glass hulls free/cheap that this might work
        > on, and produce some nice results (although some might cringe at the
        > thought). A lot of the 50-60's glass hulls even have the lapstrake design.
      • Bryant Owen
        The first fibreglas boat I saw (circa 1956?) was the result of an amateur woodworker who bought a hull and did his own woodie . I m somewhat under the
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 25, 2009
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          The first fibreglas boat I saw (circa 1956?) was the result of an amateur woodworker who bought a hull and did his own "woodie". I'm somewhat under the impression that the earliest ones were actually built that way and fb topsides came later. Any, yes, the woodwork was amazing.

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "highoveryou" <highoveryou@...> wrote:
          >
          > I was looking around at some early fiberglass boats, and came across MFG's, and Tollycraft. Tollycraft glassed a wood hull, but MFG used a glass hull with a wood topside, and that got me to thinking...
          >
          > How many folks here have used an older fiberglass hull, and made their own topside. I see a lot of glass hulls free/cheap that this might work on, and produce some nice results (although some might cringe at the thought). A lot of the 50-60's glass hulls even have the lapstrake design.
          >
        • John and Kathy Trussell
          In one of his books, PCB makes the point that trying to build and sail new small houses is unattractive because there are so many bigger old houses available
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 26, 2009
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            In one of his books, PCB makes the point that trying to build and sail new
            small houses is unattractive because there are so many bigger old houses
            available to for the same price. There are many old fiberglass hulls around
            which can be purchased for a lot less than the cost of building a new hull.
            The hull can be recycled and turned into a variety of boats. A local
            sailing club has a great Committee boat that was recycled from a 21 ft
            sailboat and there is a guy in England who put a cat/yawl rig on a Finn hull
            for a one man beach cruiser. There are a lot of possibilities.



            In my experience, construction of a sail boat hull consumes less than half
            the time and money that go into a sailboat. In the case of a "cruising"
            boat or a boat using a big outboard, it is quite a bit less than half.



            _____

            From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            David Darnell
            Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2009 11:26 AM
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [bolger] Re: Wood topsides?








            If you mean cabin out of wood, then this could work well. You can make a
            strong cabin with less weight out of wood than FRG. Make sure your hull is
            not full of water in the laminate and add one of the epoxy coatings to the
            hull designed to prevent osmosis. Epoxy encapsulating the cabin would make
            the wood and paint last longer.

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com,
            "highoveryou" <highoveryou@...> wrote:
            >
            > I was looking around at some early fiberglass boats, and came across
            MFG's, and Tollycraft. Tollycraft glassed a wood hull, but MFG used a glass
            hull with a wood topside, and that got me to thinking...
            >
            > How many folks here have used an older fiberglass hull, and made their own
            topside. I see a lot of glass hulls free/cheap that this might work on, and
            produce some nice results (although some might cringe at the thought). A lot
            of the 50-60's glass hulls even have the lapstrake design.
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Donnie
            ... In addition to using wood for topsides and interior, entire panels and units made of FRG can be cut from a doner boat and used. fiberglass tape/ filets
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 26, 2009
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              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "highoveryou" <highoveryou@...> wrote:
              >
              > I was looking around at some early fiberglass boats, and came across MFG's, and Tollycraft. Tollycraft glassed a wood hull, but MFG used a glass hull with a wood topside,



              In addition to using wood for topsides and interior, entire panels and units made of FRG can be cut from a doner boat and used. fiberglass tape/ filets could join the seams.


              I have found though, that there are no production boats new or old that have the beaching and storage capabilities of a bolger box.
            • daschultz2000
              Well one thing for sure JT. Ya don t want Dan evaluating your boat. He d think it better capsized! HeeHeeHee ;-) Don
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 29, 2009
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                Well one thing for sure JT. Ya don't want Dan evaluating your boat. He'd think it better capsized! HeeHeeHee ;-)

                Don
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