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Re: Simplified Offshore Cruiser isometric

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  • lancefgunderson
    ... How does that jib work? Where is the club attatched to the clew?
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 10 5:20 PM
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <bruce@...> wrote:
      >
      > From MAIB V13N18, a 31 foot x 10 foot cold molded, ultra-simple
      > (meaning, not much to cause stress, or break or malfunction) offshore
      > capable cruiser.
      >
      > http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/3343777491/
      >

      How does that jib work? Where is the club attatched to the clew?
    • Bruce Hallman
      On Tue, Mar 10, 2009 at 5:20 PM, lancefgunderson ... (My sailing terminology might not be right, help please). Technically, I think this sailboat has a type of
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 11 8:52 AM
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        On Tue, Mar 10, 2009 at 5:20 PM, lancefgunderson
        <lancefgunderson@...> wrote:

        >> http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/3343777491/
        >>
        >
        > How does that jib work? Where is the club attatched to the clew?


        (My sailing terminology might not be right, help please). Technically,
        I think this sailboat has a type of Cat Rig. This boat doesn't have
        a jib. Nor does it have any stays, standing or running. The foresail
        is a reaching spinnaker, and its spar is a spinnaker pole.
      • eohiggins
        ... I think you re right, Bruce, this can only be a spinnaker pole but take the pole away and you d have a jib set flying instead of hanked to a stay. I would
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 11 10:33 AM
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          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <bruce@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Tue, Mar 10, 2009 at 5:20 PM, lancefgunderson
          > <lancefgunderson@...> wrote:
          >
          > >> http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/3343777491/
          > >>
          > >
          > > How does that jib work? Where is the club attatched to the clew?
          >
          >
          > (My sailing terminology might not be right, help please). Technically,
          > I think this sailboat has a type of Cat Rig. This boat doesn't have
          > a jib. Nor does it have any stays, standing or running. The foresail
          > is a reaching spinnaker, and its spar is a spinnaker pole.
          >
          I think you're right, Bruce, this can only be a spinnaker pole but take the pole away and you'd have a jib set flying instead of hanked to a stay. I would call that corner of the sail the tack and the sheet would go the the clew at the other end of the foot.
          A spinnaker wouldn't be hauled vertically down to the deck that way but would be controlled by a guy to the end of the pole and sheeted at the other side of the foot. When you gybe the spinnaker, move the pole to the opposite corner and the sheet becomes the guy and vice versa.
          Using the pole when going to weather would make the loading on the halyard so great (assuming you're sailing in waves) that I'd expect to break something.
          However, rigging the same scrap of sailcloth as a jib to weather and a spinnaker off the wind would get max advantage out of a minimum of gear. A jib with a whisker pole to the clew would not be nearly as effective off the wind. At least that's the way I would call it.
          At the moment, it's snowing and I'm waiting for epoxy to cure and that's my excuse for putting in my two cents worth.
          Eric
        • Bruce Hallman
          I agree with your analysis. Also, I ve seen this reaching spinnaker drawn on several of Bolger s sailboats, one that comes to mind is the upgraded AS-29,
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 11 11:11 AM
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            I agree with your analysis. Also, I've seen this 'reaching spinnaker'
            drawn on several of Bolger's sailboats, one that comes to mind is the
            upgraded AS-29, and I am tempted to try one on my Micro Navigator.

            > When you gybe the spinnaker, move the pole to the opposite
            > corner and the sheet becomes the guy and vice versa.

            I wonder if the gybe could be accomplished by just having dual sheets,
            P&S, on the clew?
          • Gene Tehansky
            Bruce, Is that the sail shown on the Micro Navigator plans for the tabernacle version mast? It isn t clear from the one view how it is rigged. I ll eyeball
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 11 11:16 AM
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              Bruce,
              Is that the sail shown on the Micro Navigator plans for the
              tabernacle version mast? It isn't clear from the one view how it is
              rigged. I'll eyeball your currently posted drawings to get a feel
              for how it should work.

              I have the bulkheads built for my Micro Navigator build and just
              finished butting one of the sides. I am using a strongback so when I
              finish the second side I can begin to mount the bulkheads on the
              stongback and I'll be 3D...

              Sincerely,
              Gene T.
              On 11 Mar, 2009, at 2:11 PM, Bruce Hallman wrote:

              > I agree with your analysis. Also, I've seen this 'reaching spinnaker'
              > drawn on several of Bolger's sailboats, one that comes to mind is the
              > upgraded AS-29, and I am tempted to try one on my Micro Navigator.
              >
              > > When you gybe the spinnaker, move the pole to the opposite
              > > corner and the sheet becomes the guy and vice versa.
              >
              > I wonder if the gybe could be accomplished by just having dual sheets,
              > P&S, on the clew?
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Doug Pollard
              ... It is a flat spinnaker as used on log canoes and some other older style boats. It is set exactly right and they pull like a mule. Unlike a regular
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 11 11:29 AM
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                eohiggins wrote:
                >
                > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>, Bruce
                > Hallman <bruce@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > On Tue, Mar 10, 2009 at 5:20 PM, lancefgunderson
                > > <lancefgunderson@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > >> http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/3343777491/
                > <http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/3343777491/>
                > > >>
                > > >
                > > > How does that jib work? Where is the club attatched to the clew?
                > >
                > >
                > > (My sailing terminology might not be right, help please). Technically,
                > > I think this sailboat has a type of Cat Rig. This boat doesn't have
                > > a jib. Nor does it have any stays, standing or running. The foresail
                > > is a reaching spinnaker, and its spar is a spinnaker pole.
                > >
                > I think you're right, Bruce, this can only be a spinnaker pole but
                > take the pole away and you'd have a jib set flying instead of hanked
                > to a stay. I would call that corner of the sail the tack and the sheet
                > would go the the clew at the other end of the foot.
                > A spinnaker wouldn't be hauled vertically down to the deck that way
                > but would be controlled by a guy to the end of the pole and sheeted at
                > the other side of the foot. When you gybe the spinnaker, move the pole
                > to the opposite corner and the sheet becomes the guy and vice versa.
                > Using the pole when going to weather would make the loading on the
                > halyard so great (assuming you're sailing in waves) that I'd expect to
                > break something.
                > However, rigging the same scrap of sailcloth as a jib to weather and a
                > spinnaker off the wind would get max advantage out of a minimum of
                > gear. A jib with a whisker pole to the clew would not be nearly as
                > effective off the wind. At least that's the way I would call it.
                > At the moment, it's snowing and I'm waiting for epoxy to cure and
                > that's my excuse for putting in my two cents worth.
                > Eric
                >
                >
                It is a flat spinnaker as used on log canoes and some other older style
                boats. It is set exactly right and they pull like a mule. Unlike a
                regular spinnaker they can pull somewhat onto the wind. I had one on
                Wolftrap and though not easy to handle they are easier to use than a
                regular spinnaker. This sail works well on a cat boat with no stays but
                tends to bend the mast forward when sailing on the wind. A better rig
                for that boat would be a sprite boom that has a tendency to pull the
                mast back straight and is more weatherly than the regular boom. Most
                boats with a boom like that are sailed with boom hauled in tight when
                sailing to windward thus putting a lot of strain on an unstayed mast.
                With a spritboom the sail can be left far off the wind and get the same
                or more speed to windward with less push to leeward. If she were my boat
                I would either stay the mast or change the rig. Maybe change her to
                ketch and gets some load off the mainmast. Of course you give up a
                little windward ability and gain a lot of control.

                Doug
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