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Re: Speaking of Birdwatcher

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  • Bob Larkin
    Great to get your thoughts, Eric. I still hope the two boats can see each other one of these days! ... highway; I use the anchor- ... take green water over
    Message 1 of 33 , Feb 17, 2009
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      Great to get your thoughts, Eric. I still hope the two boats can see
      each other one of these days!

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "eohiggins" <eohiggins@...> wrote:
      >> 1. Hard covers are a bad idea except when trailering down the
      highway; I use the anchor-
      > well cover and the one hard cover forward of the mast in case I
      take green water over the
      > bow -- which hasn't happened, yet.
      Yes, I think I forgot to mention that I always leave that forward
      cover on, also. That forward space is great for keeping bags dry,
      from rain if nothing else.

      > 4. Getting aboard from the water I'm still thinking about. A two-
      rung rope ladder at the
      > starboard bow appeals so swimmers can drip into the anchor well.

      I built such a ladder, and it also worked quite well also for getting
      aboard from an inflatable. I still carry it.


      > 6. .... My cruising rig will be a WB-1 leg-of-mutton sail on a
      23ft mast.
      I sure understand :-)

      > 7. Tell me how your Origo heater for filling the boat with
      condensation. I'd been planning
      > on a tiny wood stove with a 4in chimney through the aft bulkhead.

      I have used the Origo heater and/or stove for about 20 years now, and
      really have been happy with the system. For those that are not
      familiar with it, the stove and heater use the same simple canister
      of absorbant material that you fill with alcohol. There is no
      pressure involved, and nothing to go wrong. Everything is as safe as
      a flame in a boat can be, and remember alcohol dilutes with water. It
      does not generate carbon monoxide. There is no gasoline smell. The
      downside is that the cost ber BTU is high. If you are a minimalist,
      you can cook on the heater. That is what I do, and it boils water
      for a couple of cups in a few minutes.

      Condensation around the water is interesting. Around the PNW area,
      the temperature usually drops to roughly 100% humidity as soon as the
      Sun is down. Dew is everywhere all night. A little bit of heat
      inside the boat makes it feel dry, even from the Origo, which is
      generating more water vapor. After the heater is turned off,
      condensation occurs on the windows, but inside a sleeping bag it
      makes no difference. In the morning, the humidity inside and outside
      is about 100%. As soon as the heater is lit, the insulated boat
      warms up, and I don't recall condensation being an issue. At least
      most of the time. I did get caught one night with an inch of snow on
      the boat (Depoe Bay in April!) and it was still not a problem.

      Bolger designed extended inside walls to catch condensation from the
      windows, and these have had some water in them, but not a lot. The
      insulated walls are always dry.

      I will make a point of watching the condensation better to gather
      more data!

      By the way, if one wants to be creative with the Origo concept, you
      can buy the canisters alone for a lot less than the full units.
      Defender, for one, sells these.

      Bob
    • Bob Larkin
      Great to get your thoughts, Eric. I still hope the two boats can see each other one of these days! ... highway; I use the anchor- ... take green water over
      Message 33 of 33 , Feb 17, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Great to get your thoughts, Eric. I still hope the two boats can see
        each other one of these days!

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "eohiggins" <eohiggins@...> wrote:
        >> 1. Hard covers are a bad idea except when trailering down the
        highway; I use the anchor-
        > well cover and the one hard cover forward of the mast in case I
        take green water over the
        > bow -- which hasn't happened, yet.
        Yes, I think I forgot to mention that I always leave that forward
        cover on, also. That forward space is great for keeping bags dry,
        from rain if nothing else.

        > 4. Getting aboard from the water I'm still thinking about. A two-
        rung rope ladder at the
        > starboard bow appeals so swimmers can drip into the anchor well.

        I built such a ladder, and it also worked quite well also for getting
        aboard from an inflatable. I still carry it.


        > 6. .... My cruising rig will be a WB-1 leg-of-mutton sail on a
        23ft mast.
        I sure understand :-)

        > 7. Tell me how your Origo heater for filling the boat with
        condensation. I'd been planning
        > on a tiny wood stove with a 4in chimney through the aft bulkhead.

        I have used the Origo heater and/or stove for about 20 years now, and
        really have been happy with the system. For those that are not
        familiar with it, the stove and heater use the same simple canister
        of absorbant material that you fill with alcohol. There is no
        pressure involved, and nothing to go wrong. Everything is as safe as
        a flame in a boat can be, and remember alcohol dilutes with water. It
        does not generate carbon monoxide. There is no gasoline smell. The
        downside is that the cost ber BTU is high. If you are a minimalist,
        you can cook on the heater. That is what I do, and it boils water
        for a couple of cups in a few minutes.

        Condensation around the water is interesting. Around the PNW area,
        the temperature usually drops to roughly 100% humidity as soon as the
        Sun is down. Dew is everywhere all night. A little bit of heat
        inside the boat makes it feel dry, even from the Origo, which is
        generating more water vapor. After the heater is turned off,
        condensation occurs on the windows, but inside a sleeping bag it
        makes no difference. In the morning, the humidity inside and outside
        is about 100%. As soon as the heater is lit, the insulated boat
        warms up, and I don't recall condensation being an issue. At least
        most of the time. I did get caught one night with an inch of snow on
        the boat (Depoe Bay in April!) and it was still not a problem.

        Bolger designed extended inside walls to catch condensation from the
        windows, and these have had some water in them, but not a lot. The
        insulated walls are always dry.

        I will make a point of watching the condensation better to gather
        more data!

        By the way, if one wants to be creative with the Origo concept, you
        can buy the canisters alone for a lot less than the full units.
        Defender, for one, sells these.

        Bob
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