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Re: Ply to glass or not to glass

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  • Chris Feller
    This is obviously a huge factor. I live the the Chicago area. I have had boats outside uncovered for over 10 years that are only suffering from checking
    Message 1 of 28 , Jan 28, 2009
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      This is obviously a huge factor. I live the the Chicago area. I have
      had boats outside uncovered for over 10 years that are only suffering
      from checking (cheap construction plywood). No fungus and no rot. I
      think this is due to the fact that we have fairly dry summers and our
      winters are very cold and long. I've left pieces of pine out in the
      yard on the ground for many years with no signs of rot. Just a little
      discolored from sun and water damage.

      Chris Feller
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "David" <arbordg@...> wrote:
      >
      > Jon,
      >
      > That's for sure. Let's be geographically accurate though. I thought
      > you lived in a suburb of Portland, OR???<G>
      >
      > Seriously, moss and fungus grows on anything that doesn't move around
      > here, and some things that do. We keep our boat on a trailer, outside,
      > and it takes some careful tarping and venting to keep it from rotting
      > away as we look out the window. Other climates... other problems.
      >
      > Cheers,
      > David G
      >
      > "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity" --
      > Dorothy Parker
      >
      > ************
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jon & Wanda(Tink)" <windyjon@> wrote:
      > >
      > > In Wasington upside down would trap riseing wet air and condensation.
      > > Right side up with a tarp the same thing. Eather way moss dose
      grow on
      > > a rolling stone here.
      > >
      > > Jon
      > >
      > > So many Jons the hookers will start comeing around soon.
      > >
      > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "adventures_in_astrophotography"
      > > <jon@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Jon,
      > > >
      > > > > There is also the part where what works in Texas may not work in
      > > > > Washington.
      > > >
      > > > Agreed. Only one of my boats is glassed inside and I've had no
      > > > problems with the others. However, none of my boats are in the
      water
      > > > more than part of a day, and most of them are stored upside down
      when
      > > > I'm done using them. Perhaps more importantly, my boats live in a
      > > very
      > > > dry climate with lots of wind. I can't see that spending the time,
      > > > money, and effort to glass the inside of them would be of any
      benefit
      > > > in my situation.
      > > >
      > > > Jon
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • SaIL Again Resources
           Speaking about moisture inside boat hulls, I can show you the World s best source right here on good old Cape Cod.  One reason I avoid Cypress in my
      Message 2 of 28 , Jan 28, 2009
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             Speaking about moisture inside boat hulls, I can show you the World's best source right here on good old Cape Cod.  One reason I avoid Cypress in my work! 

        --- On Wed, 1/28/09, Jon & Wanda(Tink) <windyjon@...> wrote:

        From: Jon & Wanda(Tink) <windyjon@...>
        Subject: [bolger] Re: Ply to glass or not to glass
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2009, 5:21 AM






        In Wasington upside down would trap riseing wet air and condensation.
        Right side up with a tarp the same thing. Eather way moss dose grow on
        a rolling stone here.

        Jon

        So many Jons the hookers will start comeing around soon.

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups. com, "adventures_ in_astrophotogra phy"
        <jon@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Jon,
        >
        > > There is also the part where what works in Texas may not work in
        > > Washington.
        >
        > Agreed. Only one of my boats is glassed inside and I've had no
        > problems with the others. However, none of my boats are in the water
        > more than part of a day, and most of them are stored upside down when
        > I'm done using them. Perhaps more importantly, my boats live in a
        very
        > dry climate with lots of wind. I can't see that spending the time,
        > money, and effort to glass the inside of them would be of any benefit
        > in my situation.
        >
        > Jon
        >


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • GBroadlick@aol.com
        Here the problem is mostly water that collects under a poorly set tarp. I keep a larger boat in the water during the summer. I will mostly trailer sail this
        Message 3 of 28 , Jan 28, 2009
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          Here the problem is mostly water that collects under a poorly set tarp. I
          keep a larger boat in the water during the summer. I will mostly trailer sail
          this boat to use on two week trips to Cayo costa, the Texas 200, Florida
          120... Martha Jane isn't bad to tow behind my 6 cyl pickup but gas would be better
          towing something weighing 600 pounds than 3000. Prior I would use my Bolger
          Sweet Pea. She has served me well for a dozen years. I plan to tow Martha
          Jane to Florida Friday for a 10 day cruise then store her there for a spring
          break trip and maybe the summer. Thanks for the discussion, i have work to do


          In a message dated 1/28/2009 5:03:59 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          sar207@... writes:




          Speaking about moisture inside boat hulls, I can show you the World's best
          source right here on good old Cape Cod. One reason I avoid Cypress in my
          work!

          --- On Wed, 1/28/09, Jon & Wanda(Tink) <_windyjon@..._
          (mailto:windyjon@...) > wrote:

          From: Jon & Wanda(Tink) <_windyjon@..._ (mailto:windyjon@...) >
          Subject: [bolger] Re: Ply to glass or not to glass
          To: _bolger@..._ (mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com)
          Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2009, 5:21 AM

          In Wasington upside down would trap riseing wet air and condensation.
          Right side up with a tarp the same thing. Eather way moss dose grow on
          a rolling stone here.

          Jon

          So many Jons the hookers will start comeing around soon.

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups. com, "adventures_ in_astrophotogra phy"
          <jon@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jon,
          >
          > > There is also the part where what works in Texas may not work in
          > > Washington.
          >
          > Agreed. Only one of my boats is glassed inside and I've had no
          > problems with the others. However, none of my boats are in the water
          > more than part of a day, and most of them are stored upside down when
          > I'm done using them. Perhaps more importantly, my boats live in a
          very
          > dry climate with lots of wind. I can't see that spending the time,
          > money, and effort to glass the inside of them would be of any benefit
          > in my situation.
          >
          > Jon
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • maicorick3
          I had a 31 LOA wooden cutter, plank on frame. The previous owner had replaced the original decks (teak strip over ply) with plywood, they were glassed on the
          Message 4 of 28 , Jan 28, 2009
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            I had a 31 LOA wooden cutter, plank on frame. The previous owner had
            replaced the original decks (teak strip over ply) with plywood, they
            were glassed on the exterior, unfinished on the interior. I started
            in on painting the interior, just primer and top coat. I did not
            progress very quickly (working on my back) and got three sections
            done before being distracted to other things. In less than a year it
            had all checked quite badly. I sanded off all that I had done, and
            started in with the sealer. It takes hours to do a section because
            once it soaks in you have to do it again. This is KEY! Stop short
            and it will fail. It would take a whole day just to process some 8
            or 10 square feet. Basically once I got to the end of the sections I
            was doing it was time to start again. I kept going until it started
            to dry shiny on the surface instead of soak in and go flat. Once
            that dried I sanded again to get it smooth and put a final sealer
            coat on. Then primer, then top coats. I think I did three top coats,
            maybe only two in some places. This held up for some 10 years so
            far, never checked again (I had the boat about 16 years, gone this
            last spring).

            The essence of it is you're turning that surface ply to a
            solid "plastic" wood-fibre-filled layer. You might be able to do as
            well with epoxy if you used very thin stuff, like CPES (you know of
            that brand?) but the fumes would have been intolerable in my
            situation, and it would have been big time expensive. And for all
            that, all that could be hoped for is it would work as well, for it
            surely wouldn't work better than "never failed".

            But the common "regular" epoxies are too thick to soak in enough,
            and generally cure too quickly to be able to keep applying enough to
            really saturate the wood.



            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "David" <arbordg@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm curious how much history you have with this product. If it'd
            work
            > as you say, a lot of folks would be much happier using fir marine
            > plywood for boatbuilding. It'd then be a straight tradeoff between
            the
            > increased weight (compared to occoume) vs. the reduced cost.
            However,
            > I know of one builder who tried it for this purpose - and found it
            did
            > not stop the checking. I wonder if, perhaps, he wasn't generous
            enough
            > with the application.
            >
            > Tell us more, please.
            >
            > Cheers,
            > David G
            > Harbor Woodworks
            >
            > *********************
            >
            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "maicorick3" <rickf@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > >
            > > > Yes. No question. Fir plywood will check unless glassed.
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Not entirely true. The plywood can be sealed first. A product
            like
            > > Interlux Sealer works (I've used this exact stuff).
            > >
            > > http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?
            pid=883
            > >
          • dnjost
            Ah...Chatham the fog capital of the United States. Very familiar with homes that never really dry out, and fog coming into the house through the open windows.
            Message 5 of 28 , Jan 29, 2009
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              Ah...Chatham the fog capital of the United States.

              Very familiar with homes that never really dry out, and fog coming
              into the house through the open windows. Funny thing was that the
              Diablo I had did well in those conditions, it was when I moved it
              inland and it sat under the oak trees that the rot moved much quicker
              than I did. The 18' skiff gets its coatings of glass and epoxy once
              the ice is out from in front of the garage.

              David Jost


              >
              >      Speaking about moisture inside boat hulls, I can show you the
              World's best source right here on good old Cape Cod.  One reason I
              avoid Cypress in my work! 
              >
              > --- On Wed, 1/28/09, Jon & Wanda(Tink) <windyjon@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: Jon & Wanda(Tink) <windyjon@...>
              > Subject: [bolger] Re: Ply to glass or not to glass
              > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2009, 5:21 AM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > In Wasington upside down would trap riseing wet air and condensation.
              > Right side up with a tarp the same thing. Eather way moss dose grow on
              > a rolling stone here.
              >
              > Jon
              >
              > So many Jons the hookers will start comeing around soon.
              >
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups. com, "adventures_ in_astrophotogra phy"
              > <jon@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Jon,
              > >
              > > > There is also the part where what works in Texas may not work in
              > > > Washington.
              > >
              > > Agreed. Only one of my boats is glassed inside and I've had no
              > > problems with the others. However, none of my boats are in the water
              > > more than part of a day, and most of them are stored upside down when
              > > I'm done using them. Perhaps more importantly, my boats live in a
              > very
              > > dry climate with lots of wind. I can't see that spending the time,
              > > money, and effort to glass the inside of them would be of any benefit
              > > in my situation.
              > >
              > > Jon
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
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