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Re: [bolger] Windsprint (scaling up from the Teal)

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  • Hal Lynch
    ... I use a Michalak style leeboard on my teal and it works just fine. ... I built my Teal using 3/8 ply and it turned out VERY HEAVY. If I had it to do
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 3, 2008
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      On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 6:18 PM, Steven DAntonio <sdantonio93@...>wrote:

      > Well, after having fun with the Teal (which originally was going to be
      > a windsprint, but it got scaled down). I have a few questions.
      >
      > I know the ultimate authority on this is Phil Bolger himself, but I
      > would also like to get a few other opinions first regarding the
      > following changes.
      >
      > 2. Any thoughts regarding using a leeboard instead of a daggerboard
      > (this way I won't crack the daggerboard box when I hit something).
      >











      I use a "Michalak style" leeboard on my teal and it works just fine.

      > 3. 3/8 ply instead of 1/4.
      >



      I built my Teal using 3/8 ply and it turned out VERY HEAVY. If I had it to
      do over I would use 1/4.


      hal


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Patrick Crockett
      Steven: The scantlings are fine on the Windsprint. I ve never even wondered if the 1/4 plywood was adequate on Otter
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 4, 2008
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        Steven:

        The scantlings are fine on the Windsprint. I've never even wondered if
        the 1/4" plywood was adequate on Otter
        (http://www.patrickcrockett.com/boats/index.html) -- it has always
        seemed quite strong enough to me. I used to worry about the yard
        snapping when the wind came up, but after 10 years of no mishap, I quit
        worrying about that.

        I did break a rudder in half and broke the rudder stock in half. The
        latter was due to a void in the plywood. I used marine ply for the hull
        but cut corners with the blades. Not a good plan as it turned out -- the
        stock broke as we were careening toward a group of kayaks at the MASCF,
        and the rudder folded up a few years later as we were trying to maneuver
        out of the way of a ferry.

        You can definitely trust Bolger to design a strong, safe boat. (I would
        not have had rudder problems if I had built to the design.)

        There was a Windsprint with a leeboard at the MASCF one year. Wind
        didn't blow hard enough that year to really test it, but I think it was
        probably fine. Looked easy but not quite as attractive. The daggerboard
        is definitely a pain in shallow water -- you have to pay attention to
        how far you are from the edge of the channel. On the other hand, having
        the well on the side of the boat opens up the interior and makes for
        uncomplicated structural engineering.

        I would recommend 2-part purchase on the sheet. Bolger drew a single
        part sheet and it was unpleasant to hang on to in any wind at all.

        Patrick


        Hal Lynch wrote:
        > On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 6:18 PM, Steven DAntonio <sdantonio93@...>wrote:
        >
        >> Well, after having fun with the Teal (which originally was going to be
        >> a windsprint, but it got scaled down). I have a few questions.
        >>
        >> I know the ultimate authority on this is Phil Bolger himself, but I
        >> would also like to get a few other opinions first regarding the
        >> following changes.
        >>
        >> 2. Any thoughts regarding using a leeboard instead of a daggerboard
        >> (this way I won't crack the daggerboard box when I hit something).
        > I use a "Michalak style" leeboard on my teal and it works just fine.
        >> . 3/8 ply instead of 1/4.
        > I built my Teal using 3/8 ply and it turned out VERY HEAVY. If I had it to
        > do over I would use 1/4.
        >
        >
        > hal
        >
      • pvanderwaart
        I probably should keep my opinions to myself because I m not that much of a builder, but.... Bolger himself has noted that some of his boats are strong enough,
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 4, 2008
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          I probably should keep my opinions to myself because I'm not that much
          of a builder, but....

          Bolger himself has noted that some of his boats are strong enough, but
          maybe not as strong as desirable, depending on what the user wants.
          For example, he wrote than the side of the Thomaston Galley would
          weave in and out a bit under sail, and he has written that the Folding
          Schooner would be better built of heavier stuff if the user could
          handle the extra weight in the folding operation (perhaps with some
          sort lift arrangement).

          My Cynthia J. was 3/8 and the hull was plenty strong, but one of the
          seats broke when I stood on it after a couple of years. This is a flat
          piece of ply with 1x2 framing.

          The lesson I take is that the specified sizes are good enough, but you
          don't want to skimp on the quality.
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