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Re: oarlock placement?

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  • Bob Johnson
    You could try the longshank style oarlocks used on the Bolger Sweet Pea design for stand up rowing. Pete Culler used a similar pair on his Otter rowing
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 1, 2008
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      You could try the longshank style oarlocks used on the Bolger Sweet Pea
      design for stand up rowing. Pete Culler used a similar pair on his
      Otter rowing batteau to raise and spread the oars. Dynamite Payson
      details how to make a pair of these from a regular pair of oarlocks and
      some copper tubing. With these types of oarlocks, instead of a
      standard socket, you have to fabricate a beefed up deep socket or a
      pair of supports aligned vertically to take the force of the long shaft.

      Bob
      ---
      On Saturday, November 1, 2008, at 03:22 PM, bcd5194 wrote:
      >
      > Hello to all,
      > Looking for advice on oarlocks for my "Waterman 16" canoe (I know, not
      > a Bolger boat, hope you guys aren't offended). When
      > building, didn't think about rowing, I mainly sail, but tired of
      > lugging that battery
      > and motor around, so tried setting up for rowing. Problem is, the
      > center seat is about 5 inches too high for rowing; I could lower the
      > seat (lots of work!), or I could raise the oarlocks (easy, but ugly!).
      > I've posted pics in photo section titled "rowing?". Hopefully you can
      > see in the pics where the old sidemount oarlocks were and where they
      > need to be. Just need a "3rd eye" view. Maybe one of you knows a
      > better way altogether.
      > Cheers and thanks for any and all responses,
      > Bradley
      >
    • bill shamblin
      i set a coleman canoe up to row by sitting on the floor on a low wooden crate and cushion totaling about 6 from floor. then i screwed two 4 2x4 blocks the
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 2, 2008
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        i set a coleman canoe up to row by sitting on the floor on a low
        wooden crate and cushion totaling about 6" from floor. then i
        screwed two 4" 2x4" blocks the the gunnels and screwed a 5' long 2x4
        down crosswise on top of them. i drilled 1/2" holes in the ends of
        the 2x4 for the oarlocks which made a first class rowing ststion for
        homemade oars of bannister rail and screw-on plywood blades. it
        didnt matter if the rig was slightly off center fore and aft.
        sorry no picture.

        bill in nc

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "bcd5194" <reenbrad@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello to all,
        > Looking for advice on oarlocks for my "Waterman 16" canoe (I know,
        not
        > a Bolger boat, hope you guys aren't offended). When
        > building, didn't think about rowing, I mainly sail, but tired of
        > lugging that battery
        > and motor around, so tried setting up for rowing. Problem is, the
        > center seat is about 5 inches too high for rowing; I could lower
        the
        > seat (lots of work!), or I could raise the oarlocks (easy, but
        ugly!).
        > I've posted pics in photo section titled "rowing?". Hopefully you
        can
        > see in the pics where the old sidemount oarlocks were and where
        they
        > need to be. Just need a "3rd eye" view. Maybe one of you knows a
        > better way altogether.
        > Cheers and thanks for any and all responses,
        > Bradley
        >
      • mark hamill
        http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~fassitt/canoe_mirror/m anning/manning.html This is an excellent article from Wooden Boat by Sam Manning that
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 2, 2008
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          http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~fassitt/canoe_mirror/m
          anning/manning.html

          This is an excellent article from Wooden Boat by Sam Manning that will
          allow you to sail the canoe as well.

          The American Red Cross Canoeing
          New York, Doubleday. 1973

          This book has a homemade plan for a sailing and rowing rig. There are
          instructions fro determining oarlock and oar sizes. The sailrig is a
          lateen. I used this rig for years but will make a Manning rig for my
          next canoe.

          Both designs would probably work well on some canoelike Bolber designs.

          Mark
        • mark hamill
          For the Manning Article try Googling Sticks and String Canoe. It is not the complete article from Wooden Boat so you may want to look it up there. Manning, Sam
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 2, 2008
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            For the Manning Article try Googling Sticks and String Canoe. It is not
            the complete article from Wooden Boat so you may want to look it up
            there.
            Manning, Sam F., author and illustrator: "Sticks and String," 22:33
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