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Re: oil lamp navigation lights

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  • n4_mjr
    Or these http://www.popeyesmarine.com/Lighting.htm#OIL_LAMPS
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1, 2008
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      Or these
      http://www.popeyesmarine.com/Lighting.htm#OIL_LAMPS

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Mungo Jerry" <mungojerryus@...> wrote:
      >
      > Anyone have any experience using traditional, oil fired navigation
      > lights? I was curious how they stack up with current CG regs.
      >
      > In that regard, I found a really rather nice source for ships lamps,
      > wheels, bells, etc at http://www.robinsdocksideshop.com/index.htm.
      > Very nice stock, good prices, and some very nice people to deal with.
      > Theyre internet only, based in the Baltimore area.
      >
      > M
      >
    • Brian Anderson
      I don t know about the oil red/green navigation lights, but I used an oil anchor light very often when cruising and found it to be very good. One of the best
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 2, 2008
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        I don't know about the oil red/green navigation lights, but I used an
        oil anchor light very often when cruising and found it to be very
        good. One of the best things was that I could hang it from the
        forestay at head height and it tended to light up the whole deck and
        cabintop, as opposed to the normal masthead anchor lights which could
        get lost in the stars or shore lights leaving the boat almost
        invisible on dark nights. I remember motoring into an anchorage on a
        moonless night with a friend up front and I was expecting other yachts
        but couldn't see any until I noticed that some of the stars and shore
        lights were moving around more than one would expect -- I slowed down
        even more and after a minute he saw the first of what turned out to be
        something like 20 sailboats with masthead lights but nothing near deck
        and they were almost invisible until we were right up on them.

        The oil lamps can be pretty dirty, collecting a lot of soot if the the
        wicks are not trimmed properly or if they are allowed to burn empty. I
        also used two gimbaled bulkhead mounted lamps almost exclusively for
        light in the cabin. Nice warm light, the oil didn't cost much, and
        easy on the batteries.

        Cheers, Brian

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "n4_mjr" <n4_mjr@...> wrote:
        >
        > Or these
        > http://www.popeyesmarine.com/Lighting.htm#OIL_LAMPS
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Mungo Jerry" <mungojerryus@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Anyone have any experience using traditional, oil fired navigation
        > > lights? I was curious how they stack up with current CG regs.
        > >
        > > In that regard, I found a really rather nice source for ships lamps,
        > > wheels, bells, etc at http://www.robinsdocksideshop.com/index.htm.
        > > Very nice stock, good prices, and some very nice people to deal
        with.
        > > Theyre internet only, based in the Baltimore area.
        > >
        > > M
        > >
        >
      • malcolmf
        I use a miner s lamp for an anchor light as well as a general purpose dim lighting. At the ends of the coves where I wind up anchoring, I don t worry about
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 2, 2008
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          I use a miner's lamp for an anchor light as well as a general purpose
          dim lighting. At the ends of the coves where I wind up anchoring, I
          don't worry about high speed boats hitting me. That plus a powerful 3
          cell Magna lite with a 3 watt LED bulb for a search light and a small
          red/white pocket LED light takes care of all my nighttime lighting.
          I have an antique galvanized bi-color oil which just hangs as a
          decoration in the kitchen. The problem I see with oil lamps is their
          size on small boats. Most that I have seen run from 9 to 12 inches
          tall. I am waiting until LEDs get to a reasonable price. See
          https://www.professorled.com/ for nice products, but hold your breath
          when you get to the prices.
          Calm Seas & A Prosperous Voyage
          Malcolm


          Mungo Jerry wrote:
          >
          > Anyone have any experience using traditional, oil fired navigation
          > lights? I was curious how they stack up with current CG regs.
          >
          > In that regard, I found a really rather nice source for ships lamps,
          > wheels, bells, etc at http://www.robinsdocksideshop.com/index.htm.
          > <http://www.robinsdocksideshop.com/index.htm.>
          > Very nice stock, good prices, and some very nice people to deal with.
          > Theyre internet only, based in the Baltimore area.
          >
          > M
          >
          > .
          >
          >
          > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
          > Version: 8.0.138 / Virus Database: 270.5.10/1585 - Release Date: 8/1/2008 6:39 AM
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Harry James
          Nice article on LED s by Gary Blankenship in Duckworks though a little dated. http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/05/articles/led/index.cfm Gary is not noted for
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 2, 2008
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            Nice article on LED's by Gary Blankenship in Duckworks though a little
            dated.

            http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/05/articles/led/index.cfm

            Gary is not noted for wild extravagant spending.

            HJ

            malcolmf wrote:
            > I use a miner's lamp for an anchor light as well as a general purpose
            > dim lighting. At the ends of the coves where I wind up anchoring, I
            > don't worry about high speed boats hitting me. That plus a powerful 3
            > cell Magna lite with a 3 watt LED bulb for a search light and a small
            > red/white pocket LED light takes care of all my nighttime lighting.
            > I have an antique galvanized bi-color oil which just hangs as a
            > decoration in the kitchen. The problem I see with oil lamps is their
            > size on small boats. Most that I have seen run from 9 to 12 inches
            > tall. I am waiting until LEDs get to a reasonable price. See
            > https://www.professorled.com/ for nice products, but hold your breath
            > when you get to the prices.
            > Calm Seas & A Prosperous Voyage
            > Malcolm
            >
            >
            > Mungo Jerry wrote:
            >
            >> Anyone have any experience using traditional, oil fired navigation
            >> lights? I was curious how they stack up with current CG regs.
            >>
            >> In that regard, I found a really rather nice source for ships lamps,
            >> wheels, bells, etc at http://www.robinsdocksideshop.com/index.htm.
            >> <http://www.robinsdocksideshop.com/index.htm.>
            >> Very nice stock, good prices, and some very nice people to deal with.
            >> Theyre internet only, based in the Baltimore area.
            >>
            >> M
            >>
            >>
            >
          • Giuliano Girometta
            I want to share some nonsense about government and ship s classification societies regulations regarding oil fired emergency lights: I was employed with the
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 2, 2008
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              I want to share some nonsense about government and ship's classification societies regulations regarding oil fired emergency lights:
              I was employed with the marine department of a major oil company till 15 years ago.
              Till that time, (I don't know the latest if any change has been done). All ships were required to carry emergency oil fired "Anchor light" and "Drifting vessel lights" to be used in the event of a power failure.
              By the way, even by knowing to be in violation by not diplaying the proper lights while at anchor or drifting without power, I never recall any one using such lights on the deck of an oil tanker loaded with crude oil, gasoline or avjet fuel.
               
              Giuliano 


              --- On Fri, 8/1/08, Mungo Jerry <mungojerryus@...> wrote:

              From: Mungo Jerry <mungojerryus@...>
              Subject: [bolger] oil lamp navigation lights
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, August 1, 2008, 4:25 PM






              Anyone have any experience using traditional, oil fired navigation
              lights? I was curious how they stack up with current CG regs.

              In that regard, I found a really rather nice source for ships lamps,
              wheels, bells, etc at http://www.robinsdo cksideshop. com/index. htm.
              Very nice stock, good prices, and some very nice people to deal with.
              Theyre internet only, based in the Baltimore area.

              M


















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • mark hamill
              The smaller hurricane lamp with 1/2 wick works very well and lights up the cockpit as well. Carry a spare globe and trim the wick to the crown of the cover
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 5, 2008
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                The smaller hurricane lamp with 1/2" wick works very well and lights up
                the cockpit as well. Carry a spare globe and trim the wick to the crown
                of the cover encasing the wick.
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