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Re: [bolger] hull fairing sequence

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  • echo172@comcast.net
    That s what I m going to do. I checked West Systems site and they suggest the same thing. I guess I m anxious to hit the water and looking for a short cut. I
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 1, 2008
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      That's what I'm going to do. I checked West Systems site and they suggest the same thing. I guess I'm anxious to hit the water and looking for a short cut. I started this May 1st and thought a few weeks tops to complete. It's rained here more than ever this month. I guess I have about 2 weeks of working days into it so it's not that bad but never again without a shelter.
      Thanks,
      Bruce

      -------------- Original message ----------------------
      From: Kristine Bennett <femmpaws@...>
      > Bruce when I was working at Uniflite I worked on the tooling shop for a bit and
      > the rules there were get the plug as close to what they wanted before the skin
      > coat was put on and faired.
      >
      > I would get the hull as fair as you can before glassing it. But you will still
      > have a few places to fair after you have glassed it anyway.
      >
      > I have spent a few hours with a long board in my hands.... That thing is hard on
      > the shoulders!
      >
      > Blessings Krissie



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • saillips
      Sorry for the non-Bolger references, but here are 2 examples of using stiff plastic film to achieve a significant savings in finishing labor and time. One is a
      Message 2 of 23 , Jun 1, 2008
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        Sorry for the non-Bolger references, but here are 2 examples of using
        stiff plastic film to achieve a significant savings in finishing labor
        and time. One is a web site called Electric boat consruction. Scroll
        about halfway down to the part about finishing the hull.

        http://www.pbase.com/dr_dichro/electric_boat


        The other from Garth Batista who built a 32' boat (I think ) by Jim
        Michalak, and it was on Jim's news letter archives.This is a copy of a
        message he posted to this group about where to locate the film.

        -Hi Harry --

        Here's what John Blazy has posted on his website
        (http://www.pbase.com/dr_dichro/electric_boat):

        ATTENTION ALL WHO HAVE BEEN DYING TO KNOW WHERE I GET .030" POLYESTER
        FILM: ANY PLASTICS DISTRIBUTOR LIKE GE POLYMERSHAPES (FORMERLY
        CADILLAC PLASTICS), CURBELL, OR LOCAL SHEET/FILM PLASTICS SUPPLIERS IN
        YOUR AREA - USE THE YELLOW PAGES. TRY SIGNAGE / GRAPHICS / LAMINATORS
        TOO. OTHER FILMS LIKE LEXAN IN .020 - .030 SHOULD WORK AS WELL, EVEN
        WITH THE PRE-MASKING CLING FILM LEFT ON, TO ENSURE REMOVAL. AND YES,
        YOU HAVE TO SCARF PIECES FOR LONGER LENGTHS UNLESS YOU CAN GET ROLL
        STOCK. IT SCARFS EASILY WITH SOLVENT CEMENT.

        Now that we've brought the subject up and my memory has been slowly
        rewarmed like a TV dinner from the back of the freezer, I recall that
        what I bought from GE Polyshapes was 20 mil Lexan. It came in a roll,
        which was very essential for doing big panels -- you can't roll the
        bubbles out after it's on that big an area, so you roll them out as
        you go.

        I think it was about $200 for the 40' x 4' roll. Not cheap, but in
        doing a big boat, I was able to hide it from my accountant (that is,
        the side of my brain atempting to actually keep costs under control .
        . . ).

        I cut off 8' of it in 6 sections sized 16" x 4' for making perfectly
        smooth glass butt joints, sandwiched between MDO pieces of the same
        size and screwed down -- with the screw holes filled in later. And the
        remaining 32' was just right for four ply sheets end-to-end.

        The really cool thing about this film technique is that you can have
        varying layers of fiberglass -- like overlapping pieces, or tape
        running under cloth, or extra scraps laid in at random -- and once the
        film goes over it, it all comes out glass smooth on the surface. You
        can do things like running an extra tape down the middle of a side
        panel, for instance, to reinforce it where it will be farthest from
        any framing -- but it'll be completely undetectable, with no fairing, etc.

        Good luck finding film that'll work for you. What are you building?

        Garth


        I can't find the original article by Garth, which is too bad because
        the pictures tell the story. But Garth built the full length panels
        for his boat,laid them out on a flat floor, rolled out the cloth,
        squeegeed and spread the epoxy, then he proceeded to take a roll of
        this stiff film, and starting at one end unroll it over the panel
        while applying his body weight which pushed all the air and bubbles
        out ahead of the roll. He left the film on until the next day when it
        had cured , peeled the film to reveal a mirror finish.
        David
      • Harry James
        My father a Master Shipwright, used a low angle light to profile the imperfections, I find that works as well or better than taking outside. You will find high
        Message 3 of 23 , Jun 1, 2008
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          My father a Master Shipwright, used a low angle light to profile the
          imperfections, I find that works as well or better than taking outside.
          You will find high quality sheet rocker/tapers do the same thing.

          HJ

          Douglas Pollard wrote:
          > Here is a suggestion based on my own experience. It is really hard to
          > see the imperfections in the hull with the boat inside a shed and it's
          > equally hard to feel any long gentle waves there. If before you paint
          > you take her out into the bright sunlight you may be surprised just how
          > unfair she is. With diligence and a long board you will likely get it
          > all. The problem comes when say that is pretty good but not perfect then
          > take it outside and find that it's much worse than you thought. I
          > recently built my Elver in a plastic covered bow shed. Nice place to
          > work, but nearly impossible to see imperfections because there are
          > absolutely no shadows at all. This thing of no shadows though is
          > wonderful when you are assembling a boat, or are underneath of it.
          >
          > Doug
          >
          >
          > Bruce Erney wrote:
          >
          >> I'm getting a hull ready for glass and paint, using peel ply to save
          >> sanding. I am longboarding the hull and can't decide wether to fair
          >> with filler then glass or glass then fair with microlight filler.
          >> This is so much fun, I really enjoy the work and the results.
          >> Thanks,
          >> Bruce in NJ
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Bolger rules!!!
          > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
          > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
          > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
          > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
          > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
          > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • .Randy Powell
          I have faired many a kayak and we most always fair first then glass, you end up with a greater chance of a uniform surface coating and the chance of cutting
          Message 4 of 23 , Jun 1, 2008
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            I have faired many a kayak and we most always fair first then glass, you end up with a greater chance of a uniform surface coating and the chance of cutting through the glass by sanding is greatly minimized and you just focas on filling the glass weave. If you have a goodly sized commpressor try using an inline board sander like one found in an autobody shop, I love them, fast and kinder on your shoulders.
            Randy

            --- On Sun, 6/1/08, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:

            From: Harry James <welshman@...>
            Subject: Re: [bolger] hull fairing sequence
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Received: Sunday, June 1, 2008, 10:03 PM






            My father a Master Shipwright, used a low angle light to profile the
            imperfections, I find that works as well or better than taking outside.
            You will find high quality sheet rocker/tapers do the same thing.

            HJ

            Douglas Pollard wrote:
            > Here is a suggestion based on my own experience. It is really hard to
            > see the imperfections in the hull with the boat inside a shed and it's
            > equally hard to feel any long gentle waves there. If before you paint
            > you take her out into the bright sunlight you may be surprised just how
            > unfair she is. With diligence and a long board you will likely get it
            > all. The problem comes when say that is pretty good but not perfect then
            > take it outside and find that it's much worse than you thought. I
            > recently built my Elver in a plastic covered bow shed. Nice place to
            > work, but nearly impossible to see imperfections because there are
            > absolutely no shadows at all. This thing of no shadows though is
            > wonderful when you are assembling a boat, or are underneath of it.
            >
            > Doug
            >
            >
            > Bruce Erney wrote:
            >
            >> I'm getting a hull ready for glass and paint, using peel ply to save
            >> sanding. I am longboarding the hull and can't decide wether to fair
            >> with filler then glass or glass then fair with microlight filler.
            >> This is so much fun, I really enjoy the work and the results.
            >> Thanks,
            >> Bruce in NJ
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
            >
            > Bolger rules!!!
            > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
            > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
            > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
            > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
            > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
            > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@ yahoogroups. com
            > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_ lounge-subscribe @yahoogroups. com Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >















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