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Pirate racer

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  • mind.sailor
    A friend of mine and I decided it might be fun to play around with the Pirate Racers described in Boats with an Open Mind. So, I ordered the plans from
    Message 1 of 6 , May 5, 2008
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      A friend of mine and I decided it might be fun to play around with the
      Pirate Racers described in Boats with an Open Mind. So, I ordered the
      plans from Payson.

      However, I've never used a lanteen sail before, and I have a couple of
      questions:

      1. How do you change tack? Do you have to rotate the sail around the
      mast, or does it make a difference?

      2. If it gets a bit windy, how do you reef a lanteen sail?


      If you haven't guessed, I'm relatively new to sailing. I've been
      looking for some description of how to handle a lanteen sail, and
      really haven't found anything. Any help anyone could give would be
      greatly appreciated.

      Mike S.
    • adventures_in_astrophotography
      Hi Mike, ... Lateens are not normally moved to the lee side of the mast when tacking. The relatively small effect on the bad tack is not considered enough
      Message 2 of 6 , May 5, 2008
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        Hi Mike,

        ...snip...
        > 1. How do you change tack? Do you have to rotate the sail around
        > the mast, or does it make a difference?

        Lateens are not normally moved to the lee side of the mast when
        tacking. The relatively small effect on the "bad" tack is not
        considered enough to warrant the hassle doing so. However, it has
        been done in some older working craft.

        > 2. If it gets a bit windy, how do you reef a lanteen sail?

        Normally a line of reef points will run from the tack of the sail to
        a spot on the leech a short ways up from the clew. This triangular
        section from by the reef points, leech, and foot is then bundled up
        and the angle of the yard to the mast is increased to lower the
        center of sail area.

        Having said all that, I've never actually sailed a lateen myself!

        > If you haven't guessed, I'm relatively new to sailing. I've been
        > looking for some description of how to handle a lanteen sail, and
        > really haven't found anything. Any help anyone could give would
        > be greatly appreciated.

        Phil Bolger's book "103 Small Boat Rigs" is also available from
        Payson or WoodenBoat Magazine's store and contains an excellent,
        succinct description of the history and handling of the lateen and
        102 other rigs. I consider it a must-have book.

        Jon Kolb
        www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
      • Bruce Hallman
        On Mon, May 5, 2008 at 12:25 PM, adventures_in_astrophotography ... My Tortoise has a boomed lateen, and no there is no need to rotate the yards from one side
        Message 3 of 6 , May 5, 2008
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          On Mon, May 5, 2008 at 12:25 PM, adventures_in_astrophotography
          <jon@...> wrote:

          > Lateens are not normally moved to the lee side of the mast when
          > tacking.


          My Tortoise has a boomed lateen, and no there is no need to rotate the
          yards from one side of the mast to the other. The Pirate Racer has a
          boomless lateen, which is likely similar.

          > 2. If it gets a bit windy, how do you reef a lanteen sail?


          The Tortoise has no reefing points. But in my Tortoise, I deal with
          strong gusts of wind by quickly easing the mainsheet which feathers
          the sail. If running from a strong wind, you can let the yards swing
          180 (and extending forward of the boat). If it gets really windy, I
          drop the sail and use the oars.

          The Pirate Racer has six reef ties, which you can bundle up a 'pie
          slice' of sail along the foot.
        • Clyde Wisner
          It s also available from Phil Bolger and Friends. Jon, I was thinking of asking PCB if a lateen would work on your perfect Skiff 08 as opposed to the
          Message 4 of 6 , May 5, 2008
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            It"s also available from Phil Bolger and Friends. Jon, I was thinking of
            asking PCB if a lateen would work on your "perfect Skiff 08" as opposed
            to the lug(since I can't have a nymph cubed). Clyde

            adventures_in_astrophotography wrote:

            > Hi Mike,
            >
            > ...snip...
            > > 1. How do you change tack? Do you have to rotate the sail around
            > > the mast, or does it make a difference?
            >
            > Lateens are not normally moved to the lee side of the mast when
            > tacking. The relatively small effect on the "bad" tack is not
            > considered enough to warrant the hassle doing so. However, it has
            > been done in some older working craft.
            >
            > > 2. If it gets a bit windy, how do you reef a lanteen sail?
            >
            > Normally a line of reef points will run from the tack of the sail to
            > a spot on the leech a short ways up from the clew. This triangular
            > section from by the reef points, leech, and foot is then bundled up
            > and the angle of the yard to the mast is increased to lower the
            > center of sail area.
            >
            > Having said all that, I've never actually sailed a lateen myself!
            >
            > > If you haven't guessed, I'm relatively new to sailing. I've been
            > > looking for some description of how to handle a lanteen sail, and
            > > really haven't found anything. Any help anyone could give would
            > > be greatly appreciated.
            >
            > Phil Bolger's book "103 Small Boat Rigs" is also available from
            > Payson or WoodenBoat Magazine's store and contains an excellent,
            > succinct description of the history and handling of the lateen and
            > 102 other rigs. I consider it a must-have book.
            >
            > Jon Kolb
            > www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
            >
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John Gilbert
            Generations of canoe sails and sunfish used small lateen sails. These had no reefs, you were expected to hike out further if necessary or swim (not a bad
            Message 5 of 6 , May 5, 2008
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              Generations of canoe sails and sunfish used small lateen sails. These had no reefs, you were expected to hike out further if necessary or swim (not a bad option in warm lake water). I learned to sail a tiny rowing skiff with an old canoe sail. The short mast had a screw sticking in the top, over which you hooked a metal ring attached to the yard. There was a lanyard on the boom that went from the boom around the mast and back to the boom.  The boom and yard were attached at the one end with two screw eyes. To furl I simply gathered the boom, yard and mast together and lashed it with the sheet.



              ----- Original Message ----
              From: adventures_in_astrophotography <jon@...>
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 3:25:09 PM
              Subject: [bolger] Re: Pirate racer


              Hi Mike,

              ...snip...
              > 1. How do you change tack? Do you have to rotate the sail around
              > the mast, or does it make a difference?

              Lateens are not normally moved to the lee side of the mast when
              tacking. The relatively small effect on the "bad" tack is not
              considered enough to warrant the hassle doing so. However, it has
              been done in some older working craft.

              > 2. If it gets a bit windy, how do you reef a lanteen sail?

              Normally a line of reef points will run from the tack of the sail to
              a spot on the leech a short ways up from the clew. This triangular
              section from by the reef points, leech, and foot is then bundled up
              and the angle of the yard to the mast is increased to lower the
              center of sail area.

              Having said all that, I've never actually sailed a lateen myself!

              > If you haven't guessed, I'm relatively new to sailing. I've been
              > looking for some description of how to handle a lanteen sail, and
              > really haven't found anything. Any help anyone could give would
              > be greatly appreciated.

              Phil Bolger's book "103 Small Boat Rigs" is also available from
              Payson or WoodenBoat Magazine's store and contains an excellent,
              succinct description of the history and handling of the lateen and
              102 other rigs. I consider it a must-have book.

              Jon Kolb
              www.kolbsadventures .com/boatbuildin g_index.htm




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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • adventures_in_astrophotography
              Hi Clyde, ... thinking of ... opposed ... It s funny you should mention that. When I sent my comments on the original version of the skiff back to PCB, I
              Message 6 of 6 , May 6, 2008
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                Hi Clyde,

                > It"s also available from Phil Bolger and Friends. Jon, I was
                thinking of
                > asking PCB if a lateen would work on your "perfect Skiff 08" as
                opposed
                > to the lug(since I can't have a nymph cubed).

                It's funny you should mention that. When I sent my comments on the
                original version of the skiff back to PCB, I suggested that the boat
                might be a good platform for trying multiple sails when the mood or
                purpose were right. The balanced lug for everyday use, a dipping
                lug for a relatively long trip (say, to some interesting looking
                island several miles away from the cruiser), and a lateen or settee
                for "showing off" around an anchorage. My thought was that at the
                scale of the skiff, the extra sails wouldn't be prohibitively
                expensive compared to the potential fun they might provide.

                The MAIB article is the first evidence we've seen that they received
                the comments.

                Jon Kolb
                www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
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