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Seaway, "keeping the sea" was: Re: [bolger] Re: Micro Navigator -

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  • Bruce Hallman
    Jumping in on the conversation, the meaning of nautical words like seaway fascinates me too. I just looked it up in the Oxford English Dictionary, (which is
    Message 1 of 2 , May 5, 2008
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      Jumping in on the conversation, the meaning of nautical words like
      'seaway' fascinates me too. I just looked it up in the Oxford English
      Dictionary, (which is a great dictionary). I see that the word dates
      to the year 1000 which is really old (or older) than the English
      language. OED definition pasted below:

      Seaway, Sea-way

      1. a. A way over the sea; the sea as a means of communication; the
      open sea. Also (nonce-use) a channel made for the sea.
      a1000 Ags. Ps. viii. 8 (Thorpe) Fleo{asg}ende fu{asg}las, and
      sæ~fiscas, {th}a fara{edh} {asg}eond {th}a sæ-we{asg}as. [Vulg. qui
      perambulant semitas maris.] c1425 Eng. Conq. Irel. xxxiii. 80 From
      thens thay wentten to lysmore,..robbeden & prayeden, & by the see wey
      senten many grete prayes to Watyrford. 1856 KANE Arct. Expl. I. xxiv.
      323 We passed beyond the protection of the straits into the open
      seaway. 1890 'R. BOLDREWOOD' Col. Reformer (1891) 432 The graceful
      craft, leaning to the..south wind, swept forth towards the sea-way.
      1891 J. WINSOR Columbus App. 641 Sebastian Münster, in his maps..makes
      a clear seaway to the Moluccas somewhere in the latitude of the Strait
      of Belle Isle.

      b. An artificial or natural channel connecting two tracts of sea.
      1866 Daily Tel. 11 Jan. 5/4 Xerxes cut a sea-way through Mount Athos.
      1977 A. HALLAM Planet Earth 222/1 Towards the close of the period the
      old seaway of Tethys was progressively eliminated as the African plate
      moved northwards to impinge upon the Asian plate.

      c. An inland waterway with passage to the sea, esp. one capable of
      accommodating large ocean-going vessels. N. Amer. (chiefly in phr. St.
      Lawrence Seaway).
      1921 A. M. EVANS in Chicago Daily Tribune 4 Aug. 21/7 Coastwise trade
      between Chicago and Atlantic ports..stands second only to the foreign
      commerce possibilities offered by the St. Lawrence seaway project.
      1933 Sun (Baltimore) 23 June 3/1 (heading) Lakes-to-the-Gulf seaway
      dedicated... The joining of the Great Lakes with the Gulf of
      Mexico..by a $102,000,000 inland waterway was completed officially
      today. 1941 F. D. ROOSEVELT in Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin:
      Hearings (1942) I. 2, I recommend authorization of construction of the
      St. Lawrence seaway and power project, pursuant to the agreement of
      March 19, 1941, with Canada, as an integral part of the joint defense
      of the North American continent. 1959 Times 27 June 6/5 The royal
      yacht Britannia..entered the 2,300-mile St. Lawrence Seaway to mark
      the ceremonial opening of that great engineering project. 1968 Encycl.
      Brit. XIX. 910/2 The broader concept of the 'seaway', and one which is
      in general usage, includes the entire system of lakes, locks, canals,
      and rivers which have converted over 6,600 mi. (10,621 km.) of
      mainland Great Lakes shore line of the United States and Canada into
      another seacoast. 1976 Leader-Post (Regina, Saskatchewan) 24 June I.
      1/2 An oil spill that stretched 15 miles along the St. Lawrence
      Seaway.

      2. 'The progress of a ship through the waves' (Smyth Sailor's
      Word-bk. 1867).
      1787 BURNS Addr. to Unco Guid iv, Wi' wind and tide fair i' your tail,
      Right on ye scud your sea-way.

      3. A rough sea. Usually in a sea-way (said of a ship).
      1840 Civ. Engin. & Arch. Jrnl. III. 181/2 The effects of a sea-way
      upon the Eddystone or Bell Rock. c1860 H. STUART Seaman's Catech. 62
      Weights at the extremities cause a ship to be uneasy in a sea-way.
      1867 SMYTH Sailor's Word-bk., Sea-way,..said when a vessel is in an
      open place where the sea is rolling heavily. 1883 STEVENSON Treas.
      Isl. xxiii, The coracle..was a very safe boat.., both buoyant and
      clever in a seaway.

      4. attrib.
      1867 SMYTH Sailor's Word-bk., Sea-way measurer, a kind of
      self-registering log invented by Smeaton. [The term is not used in
      Smeaton's paper, Phil. Trans. XLVIII. (1754) 532.] 1907 Daily Chron. 6
      Dec. 6/4 The Nantucket Lightship, warning seaway travellers of a
      deadly shoal.



      And, "keep the sea" per the OED means:

      Sea, n. 5b; Sea-keeping, of a ship, hovercraft, etc.: the endurance of
      (rough) conditions at sea;
    • Gene Tehansky
      Bruce, Thanks again. Had to read a long way down to run into the usage I find over and over in the groups, all the way to 4. A dictionary, whood a thought!
      Message 2 of 2 , May 5, 2008
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        Bruce,
        Thanks again. Had to read a long way down to run into the usage I
        find over and over in the groups, all the way to 4. A dictionary,
        whood a thought! How archaic! 8^) I actually have searched on the
        web in the past but got no satisfaction.

        Sincerely,
        Gene T.

        On 5 May, 2008, at 10:58 AM, Bruce Hallman wrote:

        > Jumping in on the conversation, the meaning of nautical words like
        > 'seaway' fascinates me too. I just looked it up in the Oxford English
        > Dictionary, (which is a great dictionary). I see that the word dates
        > to the year 1000 which is really old (or older) than the English
        > language. OED definition pasted below:
        >
        > Seaway, Sea-way
        >
        > 1. a. A way over the sea; the sea as a means of communication; the
        > open sea. Also (nonce-use) a channel made for the sea.
        > a1000 Ags. Ps. viii. 8 (Thorpe) Fleo{asg}ende fu{asg}las, and
        > sæ~fiscas, {th}a fara{edh} {asg}eond {th}a sæ-we{asg}as. [Vulg. qui
        > perambulant semitas maris.] c1425 Eng. Conq. Irel. xxxiii. 80 From
        > thens thay wentten to lysmore,..robbeden & prayeden, & by the see wey
        > senten many grete prayes to Watyrford. 1856 KANE Arct. Expl. I. xxiv.
        > 323 We passed beyond the protection of the straits into the open
        > seaway. 1890 'R. BOLDREWOOD' Col. Reformer (1891) 432 The graceful
        > craft, leaning to the..south wind, swept forth towards the sea-way.
        > 1891 J. WINSOR Columbus App. 641 Sebastian Münster, in his maps..makes
        > a clear seaway to the Moluccas somewhere in the latitude of the Strait
        > of Belle Isle.
        >
        > b. An artificial or natural channel connecting two tracts of sea.
        > 1866 Daily Tel. 11 Jan. 5/4 Xerxes cut a sea-way through Mount Athos.
        > 1977 A. HALLAM Planet Earth 222/1 Towards the close of the period the
        > old seaway of Tethys was progressively eliminated as the African plate
        > moved northwards to impinge upon the Asian plate.
        >
        > c. An inland waterway with passage to the sea, esp. one capable of
        > accommodating large ocean-going vessels. N. Amer. (chiefly in phr. St.
        > Lawrence Seaway).
        > 1921 A. M. EVANS in Chicago Daily Tribune 4 Aug. 21/7 Coastwise trade
        > between Chicago and Atlantic ports..stands second only to the foreign
        > commerce possibilities offered by the St. Lawrence seaway project.
        > 1933 Sun (Baltimore) 23 June 3/1 (heading) Lakes-to-the-Gulf seaway
        > dedicated... The joining of the Great Lakes with the Gulf of
        > Mexico..by a $102,000,000 inland waterway was completed officially
        > today. 1941 F. D. ROOSEVELT in Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin:
        > Hearings (1942) I. 2, I recommend authorization of construction of the
        > St. Lawrence seaway and power project, pursuant to the agreement of
        > March 19, 1941, with Canada, as an integral part of the joint defense
        > of the North American continent. 1959 Times 27 June 6/5 The royal
        > yacht Britannia..entered the 2,300-mile St. Lawrence Seaway to mark
        > the ceremonial opening of that great engineering project. 1968 Encycl.
        > Brit. XIX. 910/2 The broader concept of the 'seaway', and one which is
        > in general usage, includes the entire system of lakes, locks, canals,
        > and rivers which have converted over 6,600 mi. (10,621 km.) of
        > mainland Great Lakes shore line of the United States and Canada into
        > another seacoast. 1976 Leader-Post (Regina, Saskatchewan) 24 June I.
        > 1/2 An oil spill that stretched 15 miles along the St. Lawrence
        > Seaway.
        >
        > 2. 'The progress of a ship through the waves' (Smyth Sailor's
        > Word-bk. 1867).
        > 1787 BURNS Addr. to Unco Guid iv, Wi' wind and tide fair i' your tail,
        > Right on ye scud your sea-way.
        >
        > 3. A rough sea. Usually in a sea-way (said of a ship).
        > 1840 Civ. Engin. & Arch. Jrnl. III. 181/2 The effects of a sea-way
        > upon the Eddystone or Bell Rock. c1860 H. STUART Seaman's Catech. 62
        > Weights at the extremities cause a ship to be uneasy in a sea-way.
        > 1867 SMYTH Sailor's Word-bk., Sea-way,..said when a vessel is in an
        > open place where the sea is rolling heavily. 1883 STEVENSON Treas.
        > Isl. xxiii, The coracle..was a very safe boat.., both buoyant and
        > clever in a seaway.
        >
        > 4. attrib.
        > 1867 SMYTH Sailor's Word-bk., Sea-way measurer, a kind of
        > self-registering log invented by Smeaton. [The term is not used in
        > Smeaton's paper, Phil. Trans. XLVIII. (1754) 532.] 1907 Daily Chron. 6
        > Dec. 6/4 The Nantucket Lightship, warning seaway travellers of a
        > deadly shoal.
        >
        > And, "keep the sea" per the OED means:
        >
        > Sea, n. 5b; Sea-keeping, of a ship, hovercraft, etc.: the endurance of
        > (rough) conditions at sea;
        >
        >



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