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Re: [bolger] Micro Navigator

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  • Gene Tehansky
    Bruce, Thanks for the insight on the rigging. I thought about some sort of lug rig but I think the reefing advantages of the designed rig are important. Do
    Message 1 of 23 , May 4, 2008
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      Bruce,
      Thanks for the insight on the rigging. I thought about some sort of
      lug rig but I think the reefing advantages of the designed rig are
      important.

      Do you think it would be possible to lay the mast back with the sail
      in place to clear a bridge then push it back up? Just thinking about
      how I might use this thing. What is up with the area behind the
      house. Is there room to sit on the sides back there? Is there leg
      room? I think I'm going to be happy with this. I'd like to plan for
      2 on a long cruise (with a separate head that is) but I'd be fooling
      myself. Any long cruises will be single handed. Selecting something
      bigger just to get the separate head would be folly! I can't think
      of anything else it is missing except for the cockpit and I think I
      have other boats for that.

      Sincerely,
      Gene T.

      On 4 May, 2008, at 6:20 PM, Bruce Hallman wrote:

      > On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 1:22 PM, Gene Tehansky
      > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Bruce,
      > > Thanks. I found some snapshots of the plans (paper looks wrinkled)
      > > and it shows the tabernacle. I was in doubt when I looked at yours
      > > but I kind of recall that upgraded Micro's could make use of
      > portions
      > > of the upgrade. If I can control myself, I think the size of the
      > > Micro is the best way for me to go. I want to be able to live with
      > > this thing out of the water and to and from.
      >
      > The Micro is plenty big for one or two persons. Indeed the cabin is
      > less claustrophobic than cabins in the 30 footers I have experienced.
      > You need to decide if you can live without a cockpit. Where I live,
      > it is often too cold to enjoy the elements out in the cockpit, and I
      > really like the 'sun room' effect of the Micro Navigator cabin here in
      > cool and windy San Francisco.
      >
      > The Micro Navigator fits on a trailer nicely, but the complex rigging
      > is not suited for a quick up and down of the mast, and even with a
      > tabernacle, this would be time consuming. She is not a great trailer
      > sailer. Still, it is *really* convenient to have a small boat (wait
      > lists for marina berths for longer boats in S.F. run about 10 years).
      > Also, a 16 foot boat fits in my driveway on a trailer.
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dave seeton
      Anyone know why I was baned from Bolger cartoons?? Dave Seeton Mark Albanese wrote: Here s another likable
      Message 2 of 23 , May 4, 2008
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        Anyone know why I was baned from Bolger cartoons??
        Dave Seeton


        Mark Albanese <marka@...> wrote: Here's another likable boat from the SBJ cartoons.
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BolgerCartoons/files/Open%20Diesel%
        20Launch/

        It won't take very much more ply than the equivalent flattie or
        multichine S&G -yet show a lot more style.

        For the precursor Chaisson Surf Dory, see John Gardner's books.

        Searching images, the very best photo of a large one found is at John
        Kohnen's Flikr page.
        http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1048/1470873755_fce8896461.jpg?v=0

        Here includes a nice picture of all the parts laid out for a smaller,
        urethane glued lap one.
        http://www.odysseyskis.com/kits.htm

        Mark





        ---------------------------------
        Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • graeme19121984
        Nels also thought hard about a Long Micro Navigator, and I think also contacted PB&F about it. He has some cut and paste cartoons in the files somewhere - IIRC
        Message 3 of 23 , May 5, 2008
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          Nels also thought hard about a Long Micro Navigator, and I think also
          contacted PB&F about it. He has some cut and paste cartoons in the
          files somewhere - IIRC a navigator type and an aft doghouse one - he
          was considering lug rigs too. He did buy a good original one though.

          Say Bruce, if the 'helm inside cabin' details were the main hurdle in
          a Long Micro Nav conversion couldn't the tiller just be left short
          with lines led from it port and starboard into and around the cabin
          via turning blocks?

          Graeme

          I define seaworthiness as the ability to keep the sea in all weather
          in reasonable safety. - Philip C Bolger (Storm Petrel)

          I think "seaworthiness is strictly definable as "ability to keep the
          sea in all weather with reasonable safety." - Philip C Bolger
          (Economy Motorsailer)


          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 8:14 AM, Gene Tehansky
          > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Is the mast on the Micro Navigator in Tabernacle as designed?
          >
          > The Tabernacle is optional, and the latest plans include the
          > tabernacle design. Mine does not have a tabernacle, and I don't
          feel
          > bad at the loss.
          >
          >
          > > Has
          > > anybody gotten a hint from Bolger if he considers the Navigator
          > > upgrade plans easily adaptable to the Long Micro?
          >
          > I think Jason Stancil investigated this before, and no, there is no
          > PB&F Long Micro Navigator.
          >
          > I tried to improvise putting a cabin on a Long Micro, sketching out
          > the geometry, and I discovered that getting the 'helm inside cabin'
          > details to work with the Long Micro was not an easy problem to fix
          > (for me to figure out at least).
          >
          > It is always a good idea to try to build 'per plans' as improvised
          > designs usually end up with surprises.
          >
        • Bruce Hallman
          On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 4:16 PM, Gene Tehansky wrote: The Chinese Gaf rig is essential, because of the unusual situation where
          Message 4 of 23 , May 5, 2008
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            On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 4:16 PM, Gene Tehansky
            <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:

            The Chinese Gaf rig is essential, because of the unusual situation
            where you do all the sail control from inside the cabin. All those
            extra lines are needed to control the sail remotely. No, I think you
            could not lay the mast down without removing the gaff and boom jaws
            from the mast, and that then lets the vertical lines, the two halyards
            and two topping lifts get tangled. If you were more clever than I you
            might find a way to control this for a 'get under a bridge' event. My
            experience is with the set up after the boat ramp. Not really that
            hard to do, but with a lot of steps, it take the better part of an
            hour. As to the after deck, I have built up a short sitting stool,
            which I keep in the companionway, which allows me to comfortably sit
            with my head and shoulders in the sun. The 'new' plans show a hatch
            going forward to the anchor well, which is a small space, but which is
            actually big enough for the port-a-potty, so indeed this qualifies as
            a 'separate head', (In a sub 16 foot boat!)

            > Bruce,
            > Thanks for the insight on the rigging. I thought about some sort of
            > lug rig but I think the reefing advantages of the designed rig are
            > important.
            >
            > Do you think it would be possible to lay the mast back with the sail
            > in place to clear a bridge then push it back up? Just thinking about
            > how I might use this thing. What is up with the area behind the
            > house. Is there room to sit on the sides back there? Is there leg
            > room? I think I'm going to be happy with this. I'd like to plan for
            > 2 on a long cruise (with a separate head that is) but I'd be fooling
            > myself. Any long cruises will be single handed. Selecting something
            > bigger just to get the separate head would be folly! I can't think
            > of anything else it is missing except for the cockpit and I think I
            > have other boats for that.
            >
            > Sincerely,
            > Gene T.
            >
            >
            >
            > On 4 May, 2008, at 6:20 PM, Bruce Hallman wrote:
            >
            > > On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 1:22 PM, Gene Tehansky
            > > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Bruce,
            > > > Thanks. I found some snapshots of the plans (paper looks wrinkled)
            > > > and it shows the tabernacle. I was in doubt when I looked at yours
            > > > but I kind of recall that upgraded Micro's could make use of
            > > portions
            > > > of the upgrade. If I can control myself, I think the size of the
            > > > Micro is the best way for me to go. I want to be able to live with
            > > > this thing out of the water and to and from.
            > >
            > > The Micro is plenty big for one or two persons. Indeed the cabin is
            > > less claustrophobic than cabins in the 30 footers I have experienced.
            > > You need to decide if you can live without a cockpit. Where I live,
            > > it is often too cold to enjoy the elements out in the cockpit, and I
            > > really like the 'sun room' effect of the Micro Navigator cabin here in
            > > cool and windy San Francisco.
            > >
            > > The Micro Navigator fits on a trailer nicely, but the complex rigging
            > > is not suited for a quick up and down of the mast, and even with a
            > > tabernacle, this would be time consuming. She is not a great trailer
            > > sailer. Still, it is *really* convenient to have a small boat (wait
            > > lists for marina berths for longer boats in S.F. run about 10 years).
            > > Also, a 16 foot boat fits in my driveway on a trailer.
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
          • Gene Tehansky
            Bruce, After your time with the boat, how about a brief review. How does it sail? How does the sail work driving the boat and reefing? Is seating still ok?
            Message 5 of 23 , May 5, 2008
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              Bruce,
              After your time with the boat, how about a brief review. How does it
              sail? How does the sail work driving the boat and reefing? Is
              seating still ok? Did you bother with a motor? Add some questions I
              should have asked.

              I have an envelope ready to get dropped off at the Post Office.
              Can't get a tube in the mail without sending off a letter... Got to
              go out and get some more paint. I have been using Rustoleum topside
              paint and its relatives with good luck.

              I wish somebody would give a little refresher on painting with a
              brush only before I start the outside of the boat. Man I am sick of
              crawling in the hold and cockpit of my Single Handed Schooner. It
              ain't no queen sized bed in the hold but I think I'll be able to
              sleep there ok.

              Sincerely,
              Gene T.

              On 5 May, 2008, at 8:28 AM, graeme19121984 wrote:

              > Nels also thought hard about a Long Micro Navigator, and I think also
              > contacted PB&F about it. He has some cut and paste cartoons in the
              > files somewhere - IIRC a navigator type and an aft doghouse one - he
              > was considering lug rigs too. He did buy a good original one though.
              >
              > Say Bruce, if the 'helm inside cabin' details were the main hurdle in
              > a Long Micro Nav conversion couldn't the tiller just be left short
              > with lines led from it port and starboard into and around the cabin
              > via turning blocks?
              >
              > Graeme
              >
              > I define seaworthiness as the ability to keep the sea in all weather
              > in reasonable safety. - Philip C Bolger (Storm Petrel)
              >
              > I think "seaworthiness is strictly definable as "ability to keep the
              > sea in all weather with reasonable safety." - Philip C Bolger
              > (Economy Motorsailer)
              >
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 8:14 AM, Gene Tehansky
              > > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Is the mast on the Micro Navigator in Tabernacle as designed?
              > >
              > > The Tabernacle is optional, and the latest plans include the
              > > tabernacle design. Mine does not have a tabernacle, and I don't
              > feel
              > > bad at the loss.
              > >
              > >
              > > > Has
              > > > anybody gotten a hint from Bolger if he considers the Navigator
              > > > upgrade plans easily adaptable to the Long Micro?
              > >
              > > I think Jason Stancil investigated this before, and no, there is no
              > > PB&F Long Micro Navigator.
              > >
              > > I tried to improvise putting a cabin on a Long Micro, sketching out
              > > the geometry, and I discovered that getting the 'helm inside cabin'
              > > details to work with the Long Micro was not an easy problem to fix
              > > (for me to figure out at least).
              > >
              > > It is always a good idea to try to build 'per plans' as improvised
              > > designs usually end up with surprises.
              > >
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Gene Tehansky
              Graeme, Not having grown up in a boat world, or not being from New England, I don t know which... Keep the sea ... Now, just what does that mean. It ain t
              Message 6 of 23 , May 5, 2008
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                Graeme,
                Not having grown up in a boat world, or not being from New England, I
                don't know which... "Keep the sea"... Now, just what does that
                mean. It ain't strict english. And, what is a "seaway"? I grew up
                in an aviation world. Now an "airway" makes sense, look at a chart,
                they are all over it. But a seaway? All the explanations I have
                heard say to me, "just out on the water somewhere". Does it refer to
                the sea state. Does a "seaway" imply a standing wave situation, lots
                of bouncing around? Why not say that then? I got most of the ropes
                and lines and tacks figured out but man, this is humbling!

                Sorry for that, just got going. Any light you or anybody can shed
                would be appreciated!

                Sincerely,
                Gene T.


                On 5 May, 2008, at 8:28 AM, graeme19121984 wrote:

                > Nels also thought hard about a Long Micro Navigator, and I think also
                > contacted PB&F about it. He has some cut and paste cartoons in the
                > files somewhere - IIRC a navigator type and an aft doghouse one - he
                > was considering lug rigs too. He did buy a good original one though.
                >
                > Say Bruce, if the 'helm inside cabin' details were the main hurdle in
                > a Long Micro Nav conversion couldn't the tiller just be left short
                > with lines led from it port and starboard into and around the cabin
                > via turning blocks?
                >
                > Graeme
                >
                > I define seaworthiness as the ability to keep the sea in all weather
                > in reasonable safety. - Philip C Bolger (Storm Petrel)
                >
                > I think "seaworthiness is strictly definable as "ability to keep the
                > sea in all weather with reasonable safety." - Philip C Bolger
                > (Economy Motorsailer)
                >
                > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 8:14 AM, Gene Tehansky
                > > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Is the mast on the Micro Navigator in Tabernacle as designed?
                > >
                > > The Tabernacle is optional, and the latest plans include the
                > > tabernacle design. Mine does not have a tabernacle, and I don't
                > feel
                > > bad at the loss.
                > >
                > >
                > > > Has
                > > > anybody gotten a hint from Bolger if he considers the Navigator
                > > > upgrade plans easily adaptable to the Long Micro?
                > >
                > > I think Jason Stancil investigated this before, and no, there is no
                > > PB&F Long Micro Navigator.
                > >
                > > I tried to improvise putting a cabin on a Long Micro, sketching out
                > > the geometry, and I discovered that getting the 'helm inside cabin'
                > > details to work with the Long Micro was not an easy problem to fix
                > > (for me to figure out at least).
                > >
                > > It is always a good idea to try to build 'per plans' as improvised
                > > designs usually end up with surprises.
                > >
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Bruce Hallman
                To be entirely candid, I mostly use my Micro Navigator as a marina hangout . In other words, I find it to be extremely convenient to have a warm luxurious
                Message 7 of 23 , May 5, 2008
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                  To be entirely candid, I mostly use my Micro Navigator as a "marina
                  hangout". In other words, I find it to be extremely convenient to
                  have a warm luxurious comfy mini-apartment hangout hide on the
                  downtown San Francisco waterfront in the shadow of the baseball
                  stadium. All for $101 per month including two parking passes. To put
                  this in perspective, people often pay $150 per month just to rent
                  parking spaces in this neighborhood, or a one room studio apartment
                  can cost $2,500. I hangout on the boat almost every day, especially
                  at lunch.

                  She sails just fine, and the rigging and reefing works as advertised.
                  My polytarp sails are getting ragged, and I am thinking of making a
                  new set or upgrading to real sewn sails. Where I berth, the current
                  commonly runs at up to 2 knots, so a motor is necessary to avoid 8
                  hour waits for the tide to turn. She sails and points like a cruiser,
                  not a racer, and when I really need to make time to windward, I use
                  the motor.

                  The seating is great, as I splurged by calling in a favor from my
                  brother who is a professional upholsterer. The berths are super
                  comfortable, like high quality sofas. Plus, I rigged in a nice Bose
                  sound system.

                  The hull speed of a 16 foot boat is low, so if you don't have plenty
                  of time, your total distance traveled is limited. This is not a
                  really a problem, unless you think it is a problem.


                  On Mon, May 5, 2008 at 6:48 AM, Gene Tehansky
                  <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Bruce,
                  > After your time with the boat, how about a brief review. How does it
                  > sail? How does the sail work driving the boat and reefing? Is
                  > seating still ok? Did you bother with a motor? Add some questions I
                  > should have asked.
                  >
                  > I have an envelope ready to get dropped off at the Post Office.
                  > Can't get a tube in the mail without sending off a letter... Got to
                  > go out and get some more paint. I have been using Rustoleum topside
                  > paint and its relatives with good luck.
                  >
                  > I wish somebody would give a little refresher on painting with a
                  > brush only before I start the outside of the boat. Man I am sick of
                  > crawling in the hold and cockpit of my Single Handed Schooner. It
                  > ain't no queen sized bed in the hold but I think I'll be able to
                  > sleep there ok.
                  >
                  > Sincerely,
                  > Gene T.
                  >
                  > On 5 May, 2008, at 8:28 AM, graeme19121984 wrote:
                  >
                  > > Nels also thought hard about a Long Micro Navigator, and I think also
                  > > contacted PB&F about it. He has some cut and paste cartoons in the
                  > > files somewhere - IIRC a navigator type and an aft doghouse one - he
                  > > was considering lug rigs too. He did buy a good original one though.
                  > >
                  > > Say Bruce, if the 'helm inside cabin' details were the main hurdle in
                  > > a Long Micro Nav conversion couldn't the tiller just be left short
                  > > with lines led from it port and starboard into and around the cabin
                  > > via turning blocks?
                  > >
                  > > Graeme
                  > >
                  > > I define seaworthiness as the ability to keep the sea in all weather
                  > > in reasonable safety. - Philip C Bolger (Storm Petrel)
                  > >
                  > > I think "seaworthiness is strictly definable as "ability to keep the
                  > > sea in all weather with reasonable safety." - Philip C Bolger
                  > > (Economy Motorsailer)
                  >
                  > >
                  > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 8:14 AM, Gene Tehansky
                  > > > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Is the mast on the Micro Navigator in Tabernacle as designed?
                  > > >
                  > > > The Tabernacle is optional, and the latest plans include the
                  > > > tabernacle design. Mine does not have a tabernacle, and I don't
                  > > feel
                  > > > bad at the loss.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > > Has
                  > > > > anybody gotten a hint from Bolger if he considers the Navigator
                  > > > > upgrade plans easily adaptable to the Long Micro?
                  > > >
                  > > > I think Jason Stancil investigated this before, and no, there is no
                  > > > PB&F Long Micro Navigator.
                  > > >
                  > > > I tried to improvise putting a cabin on a Long Micro, sketching out
                  > > > the geometry, and I discovered that getting the 'helm inside cabin'
                  > > > details to work with the Long Micro was not an easy problem to fix
                  > > > (for me to figure out at least).
                  > > >
                  > > > It is always a good idea to try to build 'per plans' as improvised
                  > > > designs usually end up with surprises.
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                • Gene Tehansky
                  Bruce, Thanks for the synopsys. I can see why you use yours as you do. I started doing some digging, seems this general subject comes up every 9 months or
                  Message 8 of 23 , May 5, 2008
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                    Bruce,
                    Thanks for the synopsys. I can see why you use yours as you do. I
                    started doing some digging, seems this general subject comes up every
                    9 months or so. I sent the order off today. I think it will be a
                    fun build and an easy boat to use. Have a great week and thanks again.

                    Sincerely,
                    Gene T.


                    On 5 May, 2008, at 11:19 AM, Bruce Hallman wrote:

                    > To be entirely candid, I mostly use my Micro Navigator as a "marina
                    > hangout". In other words, I find it to be extremely convenient to
                    > have a warm luxurious comfy mini-apartment hangout hide on the
                    > downtown San Francisco waterfront in the shadow of the baseball
                    > stadium. All for $101 per month including two parking passes. To put
                    > this in perspective, people often pay $150 per month just to rent
                    > parking spaces in this neighborhood, or a one room studio apartment
                    > can cost $2,500. I hangout on the boat almost every day, especially
                    > at lunch.
                    >
                    > She sails just fine, and the rigging and reefing works as advertised.
                    > My polytarp sails are getting ragged, and I am thinking of making a
                    > new set or upgrading to real sewn sails. Where I berth, the current
                    > commonly runs at up to 2 knots, so a motor is necessary to avoid 8
                    > hour waits for the tide to turn. She sails and points like a cruiser,
                    > not a racer, and when I really need to make time to windward, I use
                    > the motor.
                    >
                    > The seating is great, as I splurged by calling in a favor from my
                    > brother who is a professional upholsterer. The berths are super
                    > comfortable, like high quality sofas. Plus, I rigged in a nice Bose
                    > sound system.
                    >
                    > The hull speed of a 16 foot boat is low, so if you don't have plenty
                    > of time, your total distance traveled is limited. This is not a
                    > really a problem, unless you think it is a problem.
                    >
                    > On Mon, May 5, 2008 at 6:48 AM, Gene Tehansky
                    > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Bruce,
                    > > After your time with the boat, how about a brief review. How does it
                    > > sail? How does the sail work driving the boat and reefing? Is
                    > > seating still ok? Did you bother with a motor? Add some questions I
                    > > should have asked.
                    > >
                    > > I have an envelope ready to get dropped off at the Post Office.
                    > > Can't get a tube in the mail without sending off a letter... Got to
                    > > go out and get some more paint. I have been using Rustoleum topside
                    > > paint and its relatives with good luck.
                    > >
                    > > I wish somebody would give a little refresher on painting with a
                    > > brush only before I start the outside of the boat. Man I am sick of
                    > > crawling in the hold and cockpit of my Single Handed Schooner. It
                    > > ain't no queen sized bed in the hold but I think I'll be able to
                    > > sleep there ok.
                    > >
                    > > Sincerely,
                    > > Gene T.
                    > >
                    > > On 5 May, 2008, at 8:28 AM, graeme19121984 wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > Nels also thought hard about a Long Micro Navigator, and I
                    > think also
                    > > > contacted PB&F about it. He has some cut and paste cartoons in the
                    > > > files somewhere - IIRC a navigator type and an aft doghouse one
                    > - he
                    > > > was considering lug rigs too. He did buy a good original one
                    > though.
                    > > >
                    > > > Say Bruce, if the 'helm inside cabin' details were the main
                    > hurdle in
                    > > > a Long Micro Nav conversion couldn't the tiller just be left short
                    > > > with lines led from it port and starboard into and around the
                    > cabin
                    > > > via turning blocks?
                    > > >
                    > > > Graeme
                    > > >
                    > > > I define seaworthiness as the ability to keep the sea in all
                    > weather
                    > > > in reasonable safety. - Philip C Bolger (Storm Petrel)
                    > > >
                    > > > I think "seaworthiness is strictly definable as "ability to
                    > keep the
                    > > > sea in all weather with reasonable safety." - Philip C Bolger
                    > > > (Economy Motorsailer)
                    > >
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 8:14 AM, Gene Tehansky
                    > > > > <goldranger02-boats@...> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Is the mast on the Micro Navigator in Tabernacle as designed?
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The Tabernacle is optional, and the latest plans include the
                    > > > > tabernacle design. Mine does not have a tabernacle, and I don't
                    > > > feel
                    > > > > bad at the loss.
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > > Has
                    > > > > > anybody gotten a hint from Bolger if he considers the
                    > Navigator
                    > > > > > upgrade plans easily adaptable to the Long Micro?
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I think Jason Stancil investigated this before, and no, there
                    > is no
                    > > > > PB&F Long Micro Navigator.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I tried to improvise putting a cabin on a Long Micro,
                    > sketching out
                    > > > > the geometry, and I discovered that getting the 'helm inside
                    > cabin'
                    > > > > details to work with the Long Micro was not an easy problem
                    > to fix
                    > > > > (for me to figure out at least).
                    > > > >
                    > > > > It is always a good idea to try to build 'per plans' as
                    > improvised
                    > > > > designs usually end up with surprises.
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Gene Tehansky
                    Bruce, I went back into the archives and found some old MAIB articles about Micro Upgrades. I read the comments you made about dropping the mast and what Phil
                    Message 9 of 23 , May 11, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Bruce,
                      I went back into the archives and found some old MAIB articles about
                      Micro Upgrades. I read the comments you made about dropping the mast
                      and what Phil said. I've been thinking about it and came up with
                      what seems like a solution. The problem is that as the booms move
                      parallel to the mast when the mast is lowered, the lines holding the
                      boom yokes to the mast grow tight. If these lines were connected to
                      the forward end of the yoke, where they would have to be longer they
                      would become loose as the boom moves parallel to the mast, or stay
                      the same tension. Thus everything could be left hooked up with
                      enough slack to pivot the boom yet be tight enough to keep the booms
                      close to the mast. This could be greatly complicated by the stacking
                      of the boom, battens and gaff but I'm going to look into it.

                      I will wait until I receive my plans to look them over before writing
                      to Phil about the modification. One problem I see could be a
                      tendency to jam preventing the boom (yard or batten) from dropping.
                      On my current boat I have experimented with epoxy with teflon powder
                      mixed in. The result is quite slippery. I have it on my booms and
                      gaffs ends and their yokes where they rub on the mast. I also
                      thought I'd dip the parrell (sp) beads in the stuff so they can spin
                      and slide easily. I'll post what Phil says but that might be some time.

                      Sincerely,
                      Gene T.

                      On 5 May, 2008, at 11:19 AM, Bruce Hallman wrote:

                      > To be entirely candid, I mostly use my Micro Navigator as a "marina
                      > hangout". ...
                      >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > It is always a good idea to try to build 'per plans' as
                      > improvised
                      > > > > designs usually end up with surprises.
                      > > > >


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