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Re: [bolger] Re: Fast Brick question

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  • Kristine Bennett
    John the webpage you posted wouldn t come up for me. Also the aft part of the float is not used as a planing surface. I was looking at my PILOT S LOGBOOK and I
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 28, 2008
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      John the webpage you posted wouldn't come up for me. Also the aft part of the float is not used as a planing surface.

      I was looking at my PILOT'S LOGBOOK and I see a number of listings for a Piper Super Cub that was on floats at the time, I was flying it. Dad trusted me with his price and joy! Dad last fall Dad celibrated 66 years flying, and with over 12,000 hours in a logbook, and 70% of that time was flying on floats.

      John if you wish let's take this out of the group. I don't think the group wants to read about aircraft hull forms.

      Blessings Kristine

      nq2u2 <nq2u2@...> wrote:
      The floats on modern float planes are shaped such that the rear of the
      float can act like a planning surface. When the pilot pulls the nose
      up during take-off he/she pulls the displacement part of hull (the
      front part) out of the water so that just the rear part of the hull
      (the planning part) remains in the water, reducing hull drag and
      allowing a faster airspeed. This procedure is called getting on the
      "step". You can see the shape of the floats in the wikipedia article
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floatplane. See the third photo
      captioned "A De Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter floatplane in West
      Coast Air livery"

      John Hess








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