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Re: Nymph

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  • dnjost
    I built a Nymph 23 years ago and ran it successfully for several sessions prior to selling it. (The current owner stills uses it and loves it.) I loved the
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 2, 2008
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      I built a Nymph 23 years ago and ran it successfully for several
      sessions prior to selling it. (The current owner stills uses it and
      loves it.) I loved the way it rowed, particularly in a choppy harbor.
      However, it was a tad tricky to get into from a dock or the mother
      ship. We had the option of using a sand beach to launch from. The
      skeg was a pain at times, but really helped with keeping her on
      course. It can carry three in smooth water if they are all good
      friends. I used 1/4" ACX and glass set in polyester for the exterior
      and a simple coating of polyester on the inside. Well painted of
      course. Build it with beefed up gunwales to set the row lock socket
      screws into.

      Happy building,
      David Jost
    • Ron Magen
      While I haven t rowed either one, I can give you a customers response to the Rubens version. About 10 years ago I built a Rubens Nymph for a gentleman
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 3, 2008
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        While I haven't 'rowed' either one, I can give you a customers response to
        the 'Rubens' version.

        About 10 years ago I built a 'Rubens Nymph' for a gentleman who's wife had a
        'degenerative muscle disease'. She had difficulty moving around, plus
        problems with her balance. He wanted a 'stable platform' to be a tender to
        his 20 ft sailboat.

        I followed the plans pretty much - except I increased the transoms to 3/4
        inch Philippine Mahogany. Also the 'fore - aft' seat - the 'split' version.
        While the exterior was Epoxy & 'glass, the inside was simply painted. {Look
        in the 'DUCKWORKS' archives . . there should be a column I wrote on her
        building}.

        About 7 years after I sold her, I got a call from the owner. He had just
        moved and accidently sheered off the skeg . . could I replace it ? {Actually
        there were a lot more problems then that . . even though the hull was still
        sound despite the neglect}.

        The point is she did her job WELL. So much so that they thought of repairing
        rather then replacing. Either one is an easy build, but I'd recommend the
        'Rubens' . . unless space is at a premium. If you want to carry her in the
        back of a van, station wagon, or 'mini-truck, the 3ft6in beam of the
        'regular' Nymph might be more suitable.

        Regards & Good Luck,
        Ron Magen
        Backyard Boatshop

        > 2a. Nymph
        > Posted by: "loosemoosefilmworks" loosemoosefilmworks@...
        > loosemoosefilmworks
        > Date: Sun Mar 2, 2008 7:13 am ((PST))
        >
        > Has anyone built both of the Nymph versions? Or more importanly rowedboth?
        > How does the
        > Rubens Nymph perform in comparison?
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