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Re: Diesel or Propane for Cooking?

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  • loosemoosefilmworks
    We had a propane cooker with oven on our Jessie Cooper. It worked well but I have always been nervous about things that can explode so when we built Loose
    Message 1 of 34 , Feb 27, 2008
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      We had a propane cooker with oven on our Jessie Cooper. It worked well but I have always
      been nervous about things that can explode so when we built Loose Moose 2 we opted for
      a kerosene cooker ( a Taylor) and it was an ongoing nightmare...We tried everything Multi
      fuel burner, preheating with alchol and blow torches and no matter what we did the
      Kerosene/diesel burners would clog up in a couple of days. In hindsight the single biggest
      bit of work on the boat we did was rebuilding the burners again, again and again!

      Of course I got pretty good at it but life is just too short for a kerosene stove unless you
      are into serious masochism.

      The other negative for diesel/kerosene as a stove fuel is that everything on the boat will
      smell like fuel and while you won't notice it afeter awhile everyone else will ( in the same
      way that heavy smokers don't relize how badly they reek of cigerettes)

      The last negative for the kerosene is the cost these days is simply evil and if you factor in
      the buying burners ( you will) and rebuild kits ( you will) the cost of propane is very cheap.

      Propane is so much cheaper in fact that it allows you to spend a bit of money on a remote
      solenoid and gas sniffer that makes most of the dangers associated with propane go away.

      Bob
      http://boatbits.blogspot.com/
    • Bill Hamm
      Overall the outboard is probably safer, it s not likely to get used down below, at least I hope not :) Bill H. ... issues. On two of them I had a valve with
      Message 34 of 34 , Feb 29, 2008
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        Overall the outboard is probably safer, it's not likely to get used
        down below, at least I hope not :)

        Bill H.

        > I've had propane cookers on 3 boats now and never had any real
        issues. On two of them I had a valve with the stem near the cooker.
        (valve outside with stem thru to inside) The practice was that when
        finished with the stove, turn the valve off and let the burner(s) die
        a natural death. It was a bit inconvenient and caused some
        complaining from my galley wench until I showed her a Columbia twenty
        something that had a propane explosion - not a whisper from her since
        then.
        >
        > On the last boat, I finally trusted an electrical switch valve -
        but then I had a bilge sniffer. The practice remained as above.
        >
        > My greatest fear was the gasoline outboard on the last one.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Ed
        >
        >
        > From: Bill Hamm <griff10us@...>
        > Date: 2008/02/28 Thu PM 01:31:14 CST
        > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [bolger] Re: Diesel or Propane for Cooking?
        >
        >
        > Propane can be safely used, well relatively safely. Requires a
        valve
        > though on the tank itself outside the hull, most are done remotely
        > and a manual valve at the stove itself. Hoses can and do leak, you
        > want to insure that any fittings that could leak don't have a
        source
        > of pressurized propane behind them. Gas sniffers and CO2 sniffers
        > are good insurance.
        >
        > Many years back I used a camp stove on a very small cruiser (16')
        and
        > stored the cylinders in the locker with the gas tank that vented
        > overboard, also had the stove in the cockpit only, never down below
        > (not alot of down below in a 16' boat to start with <g>).
        >
        > Bill H.
        >
        > > I don't think I've seen a better setup for propane than in george
        > > Buehler's "Backyard Boatbuilding".
        > > Tanks are stored externally in a well with no drainage into the
        > hull.
        > > Galley has a manual connexion to tank valve. Open manual
        connexion
        > and
        > > gas starts to flow.
        > > Light stove. Cook.
        > > When finished, turn off gas flow using manual connexion.
        > > Flame gradually dies on stove.
        > > Almost idiot proof.
        > > Idiots please point out failings ;-)
        > >
        > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > On Wed, Feb 27, 2008 at 6:29 AM, adventures_in_astrophotography
        > > > <jon@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > We have experience with propane, but not on boats. Propane
        > delivers
        > > > > instant heat that's easy to regulate. It's available just
        about
        > > > > everywhere. We could use a cheap and effective camping stove
        > > >
        > > > I use a 'plain old' propane camp stove on my Micro Navigator
        with
        > > > almost with daily use, and I am perfectly happy with the
        > arrangement.
        > > > As to the safety issue, I simply unscrew the bottle from the
        stove
        > > > after every use. (A few times I did not, I found that it
        leaked,
        > and
        > > > the bottle was empty the next day.) Occasionally, I have fired
        > the
        > > > stove up to give a quick blast of heat. If the condensation
        gets
        > > > high, I open the window.
        > > >
        > > > Simple, compact, cheap and effective.
        > > >
        > >
        >
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