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Re: Houseboat #481

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  • Peter Lenihan
    ... in ... Harry, a)After building the houseboat,everything feels lighter to Paul:-) b)Paul is mixing up metric and english measures.:-) c)If you only ever
    Message 1 of 26 , Jan 29, 2008
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am amazed that it is only 60lbs. It comes out of 4 sheets of 1/4
      in
      > which are usually 25lbs apiece, plus dimensional lumber. Did you do
      > anything different to lighten it?

      Harry,

      a)After building the houseboat,everything feels lighter to Paul:-)

      b)Paul is mixing up metric and english measures.:-)

      c)If you only ever have to lift one end at a time, you are probably
      lifting only half the total weight,thus 60lbs X 2 would put it around
      your guestimate.....just a thought. :-)

      Sincerely,
      Peter Lenihan
    • Paul McLellan
      Peter, I know I am mixed up but in a crazy sort of way and old enough to remember when we went to the bathroom outside and smoked inside. The Junebug weighs
      Message 2 of 26 , Jan 29, 2008
        Peter, I know I am mixed up but in a crazy sort of way and old enough
        to remember when we went to the bathroom outside and smoked inside.
        The Junebug weighs only 60 pounds or about 25 kilos. It was made
        from 4 sheets of luan, glassed on the interior floor and the bottom.
        I used eastern white cedar for the dimensional lumber and skimped
        where possible. I did not add the sailing features and there are no
        seats as I have a box with all the essentials for boating in it which
        serves as a step on the Houseboat and a seat on the Junebug. We love
        this little boat and it got a lot of use last year with no problems
        other than a small wound when I dropped it about eight feet onto a
        sharp object. I did put three small skids on the bottom and is is
        stiff enough with no oilcanning at high rowing speed or even with the
        2 hp Honda pushing it along.
        With the clam skiff I am estimating the final weight to be about 200
        lbs. It is a heck of a lot of boat for that weight. regards paul


        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <peterlenihan@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I am amazed that it is only 60lbs. It comes out of 4 sheets of
        1/4
        > in
        > > which are usually 25lbs apiece, plus dimensional lumber. Did you
        do
        > > anything different to lighten it?
        >
        > Harry,
        >
        > a)After building the houseboat,everything feels lighter to Paul:-)
        >
        > b)Paul is mixing up metric and english measures.:-)
        >
        > c)If you only ever have to lift one end at a time, you are probably
        > lifting only half the total weight,thus 60lbs X 2 would put it
        around
        > your guestimate.....just a thought. :-)
        >
        > Sincerely,
        > Peter Lenihan
        >
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... That would be Paul McLellan, and #481 Happy Adventurer was launched June 29, 2004. I was impressed!
        Message 3 of 26 , Jan 29, 2008
          On Jan 27, 2008 2:14 PM, Peter Lenihan <peterlenihan@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > There is one esteemed member here who built one.

          That would be Paul McLellan, and #481 "Happy Adventurer" was launched
          June 29, 2004. I was impressed!
        • dnjost
          Paul - i would love a picture of the roof rack with the front extension. That would solve so many issues with long boats. My car s roof would appreciate it.
          Message 4 of 26 , Jan 30, 2008
            Paul -

            i would love a picture of the roof rack with the front extension. That
            would solve so many issues with long boats. My car's roof would
            appreciate it.

            David Jost
          • Paul McLellan
            ... That ... No picture required David but I could send you some off line. I made the racks out of 1 1/4 square steel pipe 3/16 thickness. It is 5 feet
            Message 5 of 26 , Feb 1, 2008
              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dnjost" <davidjost@...> wrote:
              >
              > Paul -
              >
              > i would love a picture of the roof rack with the front extension.
              That
              > would solve so many issues with long boats. My car's roof would
              > appreciate it.
              >
              > David Jost
              >
              No picture required David but I could send you some off line. I made
              the racks out of 1 1/4" square steel pipe 3/16" thickness. It is 5
              feet wide and the extension is a 5 foot piece of 1" square pipe which
              fits perfectly inside the rack. I just silde it in a foot or so and
              voila, start loading the boat! Sometime if space is a problem, I can
              store the extension inside the rack. These are the best racks I have
              had and total cost was $20, It is on a Honda CR-V and the car part
              is a piece of angle iron drilled out to fit the pre-drilled holes on
              the roof. I welded pieces of angle on the square pipe that fit the
              car piece. The rack is bolted to the car with 3/8 bolts and is put
              on or removed in a few minutes. This is a very strong rack. The
              Junebug is a snap to load because it is so light but have loaded much
              heavier boats easily. The longer the boat, the easier it is.
              regards and happy boating, Paul waiting for a major blizzard and
              fairing the bottom on a Small clam skiff. I can see it on the roof
              rack now.
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