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Re: build a micro?

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  • Peter Lenihan
    ... wrote: Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has ... the ... for ... PB ... same ... Weeelllll I don t know about that.The water certainly hasn t
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 2, 2007
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@...>
      wrote:
      Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has
      > changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't think
      the
      > bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right answer
      for
      > someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike some
      PB
      > designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the
      same
      > bang for the buck.
      >
      > Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly as
      > this one.


      Weeelllll I don't know about that.The water certainly hasn't changed
      all that much nor has the wind and they've been around for a very very
      long time :-)

      For max interior volume, it is hard to beat a box, any box.
      Information technology has advanced and there are indeed oodles of new
      fresh designs out there but,and here is the challenge; using only 14
      sheets of plywood, produce a boat with handsome rugged good looks( I
      know,not eveyones' cup of tea), make it self-righing,self-
      rescuing,capable of comfortably sailing in all but the strongest of
      winds( well up into the small craft warning zone),able to be
      provisioned with stores for two for at least a week at a time,give it
      a cabin not sliced in two buy a centerboard case and with a comfy
      sitting headroom cabin.Make it railerable.
      I'll bet the computer designers will be mighty pissed off when the
      machine keeps spitting out a) a box or b) a shape so "tortured" only a
      professional would attempt to build it.
      In the end,however, one should keep in mind the origins of the MICRO
      design. It was intended to be a boat easily built by non-boatbuilders,
      a relaxing and forgiving day-sailor which could handle an occasional
      over-night and at the end of the day be brought home and put to bed
      right beside the car in the drive way, while not costing a small
      fortune to build in relatively little time.This bare bones brief, I
      believe, was met with the MICRO, and many of those same requirements
      still hold considerable allure for young and not so young folks
      seeking to be on the water in a boat wrought of their own hands.

      I know there have been some fine summer days when I wished I still had
      mine in the water:-)(are you reading this Nels?...in the water!)

      O.K., enough of my nonsense. I was and remain a sucker for the Micro!!


      Sincerely,

      Peter Lenihan...............
    • graeme19121984
      Centennial II. 13. sheets. !!
      Message 2 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
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        Centennial II.
        13. sheets. !!


        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <peterlenihan@...> wrote:

        > here is the challenge; using only 14 sheets of plywood, produce a
        >boat with handsome rugged good looks( I know,not eveyones' cup of
        >tea), make it self-righing,self-rescuing,capable of comfortably
        >sailing in all but the strongest of winds( well up into the small
        >craft warning zone),able to be provisioned with stores for two for at
        >least a week at a time,give it a cabin not sliced in two buy a
        >centerboard case and with a comfy sitting headroom cabin.Make it
        >railerable.
      • Peter Lenihan
        ... Ah,pretty good that one Graeme! But, I forgot to mention with the Micro, a sailing draft of not more then what,18 :-) And while I m at it,a sailing rig
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
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          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "graeme19121984" <graeme19121984@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Centennial II.
          > 13. sheets. !!

          Ah,pretty good that one Graeme! But, I forgot to mention with the
          Micro, a sailing draft of not more then what,18" :-)
          And while I'm at it,a sailing rig not encumbered by peak sprits:-D

          Sincerely,

          Peter Lenihan, scatching his head for more minor differences as the
          snow flies from our first snow storm of the
          year...yippee....yahoo....and boo!!
        • mike weekes
          There ia a 25 foot tug I d like to build - has anyone ever heard of a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25 long and 8 6 wide with perhaps 2 foot draw?
          Message 4 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
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            There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with perhaps 2 foot draw?

            yellowstone_mike@...

            Peter Lenihan <peterlenihan@...> wrote:
            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@...>
            wrote:
            Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has
            > changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't think
            the
            > bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right answer
            for
            > someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike some
            PB
            > designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the
            same
            > bang for the buck.
            >
            > Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly as
            > this one.

            Weeelllll I don't know about that.The water certainly hasn't changed
            all that much nor has the wind and they've been around for a very very
            long time :-)

            For max interior volume, it is hard to beat a box, any box.
            Information technology has advanced and there are indeed oodles of new
            fresh designs out there but,and here is the challenge; using only 14
            sheets of plywood, produce a boat with handsome rugged good looks( I
            know,not eveyones' cup of tea), make it self-righing,self-
            rescuing,capable of comfortably sailing in all but the strongest of
            winds( well up into the small craft warning zone),able to be
            provisioned with stores for two for at least a week at a time,give it
            a cabin not sliced in two buy a centerboard case and with a comfy
            sitting headroom cabin.Make it railerable.
            I'll bet the computer designers will be mighty pissed off when the
            machine keeps spitting out a) a box or b) a shape so "tortured" only a
            professional would attempt to build it.
            In the end,however, one should keep in mind the origins of the MICRO
            design. It was intended to be a boat easily built by non-boatbuilders,
            a relaxing and forgiving day-sailor which could handle an occasional
            over-night and at the end of the day be brought home and put to bed
            right beside the car in the drive way, while not costing a small
            fortune to build in relatively little time.This bare bones brief, I
            believe, was met with the MICRO, and many of those same requirements
            still hold considerable allure for young and not so young folks
            seeking to be on the water in a boat wrought of their own hands.

            I know there have been some fine summer days when I wished I still had
            mine in the water:-)(are you reading this Nels?...in the water!)

            O.K., enough of my nonsense. I was and remain a sucker for the Micro!!

            Sincerely,

            Peter Lenihan...............






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Kenneth Grome
            Stitch and glue boats can be built in any size. Most larger boats use frames, molds, bulkheads, etc. to hold the shape during construction. What boat are you
            Message 5 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
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              Stitch and glue boats can be built in any size. Most larger boats use
              frames, molds, bulkheads, etc. to hold the shape during construction.
              What boat are you talking about?

              Sincerely,
              Ken Grome
              Bagacay Boatworks
              www.bagacayboatworks.com




              > There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of a
              > 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with
              > perhaps 2 foot draw?
            • Peter Lenihan
              ... a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25 long and 8 6 wide with perhaps 2 foot draw? ... Sam Devlin has two lovely stitch-n-glue tugs ,that look like
              Message 6 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
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                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, mike weekes <yellowstone_mike@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of
                a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with
                perhaps 2 foot draw?
                >
                > yellowstone_mike@...


                Sam Devlin has two lovely stitch-n-glue "tugs",that look like this:

                http://www.devlinboat.com/godzilla2.jpg

                His web site has more pictures and information.

                Sincerely,

                Peter Lenihan, wandering in a winter wonderland...........
              • Harry James
                His Kingfisher also http://www.devlinboat.com/dckingfisher26.htm HJ ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 21 , Dec 4, 2007
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                  His Kingfisher also

                  http://www.devlinboat.com/dckingfisher26.htm

                  HJ

                  Peter Lenihan wrote:
                  > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, mike weekes <yellowstone_mike@...>
                  > wrote:
                  >
                  >> There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of
                  >>
                  > a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with
                  > perhaps 2 foot draw?
                  >
                  >>
                  >> yellowstone_mike@...
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  > Sam Devlin has two lovely stitch-n-glue "tugs",that look like this:
                  >
                  > http://www.devlinboat.com/godzilla2.jpg
                  >
                  > His web site has more pictures and information.
                  >
                  > Sincerely,
                  >
                  > Peter Lenihan, wandering in a winter wonderland...........
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Bolger rules!!!
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                  >
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                  >
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                  >


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