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build a micro?

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  • Tri Robinson
    Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys with experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any real experience but looking to
    Message 1 of 21 , Nov 20, 2007
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      Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys with
      experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any real
      experience but looking to get started. I originally was intending to
      order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I then saw
      the micro and while it isnt maybe as pretty, it seems to be functionaly
      superior. I want to use the boat to camp and sail on local lakes. but
      have aspirations of maybe going to Puget Sound or something similar in
      the future. I am hoping you guys can tell me the advantagess to the
      micro and how good of a boat it is.

      Look forward to your response
      Thank you
      Tri
    • 9buck crowley
      Tri, I ve owned my micro for over ten years now. Mine isn t a great performer upwind but other than that I love it. It s got lots of storage space for
      Message 2 of 21 , Nov 20, 2007
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        Tri,
        I've owned my micro for over ten years now. Mine isn't a great performer upwind but other than that I love it. It's got lots of storage space for cruising. The flat bottom makes for a very stable platform both under sail and at anchor. It's cheap to own and operate. Mine is powered by a 5hp four stroke but for the most part the boat cruises at hull speed just above idle. This summer I took to towing the boat by rowing it behind the tender during the calms just to get a little exercise. I can't be certain but I suspect you could scull a micro at over two knots.
        If you haven't built a boat before I'd reccomend you start on something smaller though. My tender is a nutshell pram. It's a great little boat and will give you the experience you'll need to build the micro.
        You may or not know this but building your own boat while satisfying is not an economical proposition. You could easily spend $6000. on the boat trailer and motor and not get half that for it on the day you launched.

        Buck Crowley
        ________________________________
        > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        > From: gzusinme@...
        > Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2007 05:03:36 +0000
        > Subject: [bolger] build a micro?
        >
        >
        > Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys with
        > experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any real
        > experience but looking to get started. I originally was intending to
        > order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I then saw
        > the micro and while it isnt maybe as pretty, it seems to be functionaly
        > superior. I want to use the boat to camp and sail on local lakes. but
        > have aspirations of maybe going to Puget Sound or something similar in
        > the future. I am hoping you guys can tell me the advantagess to the
        > micro and how good of a boat it is.
        >
        > Look forward to your response
        > Thank you
        > Tri
        >
        >
        >
        _________________________________________________________________
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      • Jim Kessler
        Tri, I really can t speak for a Micro other than it is the most popular of the designs here..many have been built because of the thoughts you have expressed.
        Message 3 of 21 , Nov 21, 2007
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          Tri,
          I really can't speak for a Micro other than it is the most popular of
          the designs here..many have been built because of the thoughts you have
          expressed.
          Personally I built a light schooner which has exccelled my expectations
          for my desires.
          That said nothing can compare with the joy of building your own boat.
          Friends and family will always think highly of you after the boat is
          launched.
          As before said you can purchase a boat much cheaper than building..For
          instance I could own a high tensil cabin cruiser for what it cost me to
          build the light schooner....but she wouldn't stand out...you would be
          one of many...
          For handleing, ease ,accomedation and a conversation piece build a
          Bolger design.

          Jim

          p.s. You already said you wanted to build...a Micro. The light schooner
          was my first built and she turned out great...if the Micro is the boat
          you want build do it and ask questions here along the way.

          Jim



          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tri Robinson" <gzusinme@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys with
          > experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any real
          > experience but looking to get started. I originally was intending to
          > order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I then saw
          > the micro and while it isnt maybe as pretty, it seems to be
          functionaly
          > superior. I want to use the boat to camp and sail on local lakes. but
          > have aspirations of maybe going to Puget Sound or something similar
          in
          > the future. I am hoping you guys can tell me the advantagess to the
          > micro and how good of a boat it is.
          >
          > Look forward to your response
          > Thank you
          > Tri
          >
        • alias1719
          As has been said before - Start small! Don t put in a big investment in time and money on your first project - you might hate it! Boatbuilding will take you
          Message 4 of 21 , Nov 21, 2007
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            As has been said before - Start small! Don't put in a big investment
            in time and money on your first project - you might hate it!
            Boatbuilding will take you much longer and cost more than you think
            (but it's definitely worth it!). And, progress measured in weeks,
            rather than months or even years, is MUCH more conducive to keeping
            up one's enthusiasm!
            Also, a Micro is a pretty large boat, for it's size - and mostly "to
            camp and sail on local lakes." It is well designed for it's purpose
            (though heavy, short and slow), but trailering, launching, rigging
            and then reversing the process will take up a lot of time and effort
            that you could be using to sail, instead. There are many other
            boats that will suit your stated purposes that are easier and
            quicker to construct - and easier and quicker to get sailing, too.

            Anyway, start with a smaller, less expensive, project and you're
            much more likely to both finish the boat, and be able to use it
            easily. Plus, you'll get to make mistakes and figure out the process
            on something a bit less dear.

            Check out smaller Bolger designs on Payson's website:
            http://www.instantboats.com/boats.html

            Or, check out other simple designs by (Bolger inspired) Jim Michalak:
            http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/michalak.htm
            In particular, he has a number of unballasted micro-cruisers that
            are less complex than Bolger's Micro, and still very functional.

            And, you should read some books! Jim Michalak's "Boatbuilding for
            Beginners and Beyond" is perfect, and of course there's the books by
            H.H. Payson, which are specific to some of the Bolger designs. You
            can't go wrong with the late, great, Thomas Firth Jones, either.

            If you're dead set on a trailer sailing cruiser, you should know
            that there are many, many old fiberglass ones available CHEAP, all
            over the country. Buy one and start sailing right away, instead of
            waaaay down the road. They'll likely be longer (ergo, faster) than a
            Micro, too, with more in the way of creature comforts. You can still
            build a smaller boat, too - though I daresay it won't be your last.
            It's addictive!

            Good luck! - Dave

            And, yes, I once built a Micro . . . .





            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tri Robinson" <gzusinme@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys with
            > experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any real
            > experience but looking to get started. I originally was intending
            to
            > order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I then
            saw
            > the micro and while it isnt maybe as pretty, it seems to be
            functionaly
            > superior. I want to use the boat to camp and sail on local lakes.
            but
            > have aspirations of maybe going to Puget Sound or something
            similar in
            > the future. I am hoping you guys can tell me the advantagess to
            the
            > micro and how good of a boat it is.
            >
            > Look forward to your response
            > Thank you
            > Tri
            >
          • Ed Bachmannn
            And along those lines.. Gavin Atkin s new book is out titled Ultrasimple Boat Building It is a great book for new builders and even for more experienced
            Message 5 of 21 , Nov 21, 2007
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              And along those lines..



              Gavin Atkin's new book is out titled Ultrasimple Boat Building



              It is a great book for new builders and even for more experienced builders
              looking for a refresher on the basics and some simple fun designs.



              There is a good description at the Duckworks Magazine site.
              http://www.duckworksbbs.com/media/books/usbb/index.htm



              Ed B



              -----Original Message-----
              From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              alias1719
              Sent: Wednesday, November 21, 2007 3:39 PM
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [bolger] Re: build a micro?



              As has been said before - Start small! Don't put in a big investment
              in time and money on your first project - you might hate it!
              Boatbuilding will take you much longer and cost more than you think
              (but it's definitely worth it!). And, progress measured in weeks,
              rather than months or even years, is MUCH more conducive to keeping
              up one's enthusiasm!
              ......





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bruce Hallman
              ... Specifically, build models first. Speaking personally, I have learned so much more by building paper models of boats, and by building virtual models of
              Message 6 of 21 , Nov 21, 2007
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                > As has been said before - Start small!

                Specifically, build models first.

                Speaking personally, I have learned so much more by building paper
                models of boats,
                and by building 'virtual' models of boats using a computer.

                I say this, having built 12+ full sized boats, 30+ paper models, and
                countless computer models. The models are the most useful for
                increasing my understanding, plus (or because) they are very much
                cheaper and faster to realize. A mistake in a full sized boat can be
                a big regret, the same mistake in a model is a welcome learning
                experience.
              • Jim Kessler
                I agree. I also built a model of my build before tackleing the real thing...It was very helpful. Jim
                Message 7 of 21 , Nov 22, 2007
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                  I agree. I also built a model of my build before tackleing the real
                  thing...It was very helpful.

                  Jim




                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > As has been said before - Start small!
                  >
                  > Specifically, build models first.
                  >
                  > Speaking personally, I have learned so much more by building paper
                  > models of boats,
                  > and by building 'virtual' models of boats using a computer.
                  >
                  > I say this, having built 12+ full sized boats, 30+ paper models, and
                  > countless computer models. The models are the most useful for
                  > increasing my understanding, plus (or because) they are very much
                  > cheaper and faster to realize. A mistake in a full sized boat can be
                  > a big regret, the same mistake in a model is a welcome learning
                  > experience.
                  >
                • proaconstrictor
                  ... I don t personally put Stevensons on the same level as Bolger, and others. So I think you are moving in the right direction. Boats are about what you want
                  Message 8 of 21 , Nov 28, 2007
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                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tri Robinson" <gzusinme@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys with
                    > experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any real
                    > experience but looking to get started. I originally was intending to
                    > order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I then saw


                    I don't personally put Stevensons on the same level as Bolger, and
                    others. So I think you are moving in the right direction.

                    Boats are about what you want out of them. The more you can narrow
                    the brief the better. Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has
                    changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't think the
                    bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right answer for
                    someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike some PB
                    designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the same
                    bang for the buck.

                    Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly as
                    this one. I would build, and have, many of the smaller box designs,
                    but I don't see the reason to configure a larger boat this way today.
                    When I started out building boats 30 years ago, so many tools were
                    either unthought of or extremely expensive. Raw plywood was very
                    cheap, in good quality. And the prefered sheathing for ply and even
                    strip boats at the time was fiberglass resin. For example. a quality
                    General planer cost about 70% of a Volvo, in the mid 70s. now you can
                    pick one up for the cost of 2-4 fills of the gas tank. Free online
                    design programs were not even on the horizon. And every decade has
                    brought major changes. Whether tackling traditional projects, like
                    planking, or modern designs, it's all so much easier, not to mention
                    the information revolution, that I really fail to see the practical
                    sideo of a Micro any longer.
                  • meier.denis
                    I will launch my Micro named Wave in the spring and have enjoyed every minute of building a small cruiser that will do everything I want it to as I cruise into
                    Message 9 of 21 , Nov 28, 2007
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                      I will launch my Micro named Wave in the spring and have enjoyed
                      every minute of building a small cruiser that will do everything I
                      want it to as I cruise into my retirement a few years from now.I have
                      used okume mahogany and west epoxy. Both are easy to work with for an
                      amateur. A jig saw, some clamps and a radial arm saw to rip 1 x 6
                      spruce and you are good to go. Someone told me that the hardest part
                      of building the boat would be just getting started and I agree. I
                      have been looking at plans for 25 years and the Micro is the #1
                      choice for me.I just can't wait to get my MicroWave in the water.

                      Denis
                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor"
                      <proaconstrictor@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tri Robinson" <gzusinme@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys
                      with
                      > > experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any
                      real
                      > > experience but looking to get started. I originally was intending
                      to
                      > > order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I then
                      saw
                      >
                      >
                      > I don't personally put Stevensons on the same level as Bolger, and
                      > others. So I think you are moving in the right direction.
                      >
                      > Boats are about what you want out of them. The more you can narrow
                      > the brief the better. Micros are getting a little dated. A lot
                      has
                      > changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't think
                      the
                      > bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right answer
                      for
                      > someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike some
                      PB
                      > designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the
                      same
                      > bang for the buck.
                      >
                      > Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly
                      as
                      > this one. I would build, and have, many of the smaller box
                      designs,
                      > but I don't see the reason to configure a larger boat this way
                      today.
                      > When I started out building boats 30 years ago, so many tools were
                      > either unthought of or extremely expensive. Raw plywood was very
                      > cheap, in good quality. And the prefered sheathing for ply and
                      even
                      > strip boats at the time was fiberglass resin. For example. a
                      quality
                      > General planer cost about 70% of a Volvo, in the mid 70s. now you
                      can
                      > pick one up for the cost of 2-4 fills of the gas tank. Free online
                      > design programs were not even on the horizon. And every decade has
                      > brought major changes. Whether tackling traditional projects, like
                      > planking, or modern designs, it's all so much easier, not to
                      mention
                      > the information revolution, that I really fail to see the practical
                      > sideo of a Micro any longer.
                      >
                    • lancasterdennis
                      -- Hi Denis, Couldn t agree with you more. I plan to launch my Old Shoe early next summer. I feel that PCB s designs are still appealing to many folks. I m
                      Message 10 of 21 , Nov 28, 2007
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                        --
                        Hi Denis,

                        Couldn't agree with you more. I plan to launch my Old Shoe early
                        next summer. I feel that PCB's designs are still appealing to many
                        folks. I'm building mine because I personally like the design and it
                        fits my needs perfectly. Realizing that there are thousands of boat
                        designs out there...it just boils down to personal choice.. has to.

                        Best of luck to you on your forth-coming launch.

                        Regards,

                        Dennis

                        - In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "meier.denis" <meier.denis@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I will launch my Micro named Wave in the spring and have enjoyed
                        > every minute of building a small cruiser that will do everything I
                        > want it to as I cruise into my retirement a few years from now.I
                        have
                        > used okume mahogany and west epoxy. Both are easy to work with for
                        an
                        > amateur. A jig saw, some clamps and a radial arm saw to rip 1 x 6
                        > spruce and you are good to go. Someone told me that the hardest
                        part
                        > of building the boat would be just getting started and I agree. I
                        > have been looking at plans for 25 years and the Micro is the #1
                        > choice for me.I just can't wait to get my MicroWave in the water.
                        >
                        > Denis
                        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor"
                        > <proaconstrictor@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tri Robinson" <gzusinme@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys
                        > with
                        > > > experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any
                        > real
                        > > > experience but looking to get started. I originally was
                        intending
                        > to
                        > > > order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I
                        then
                        > saw
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I don't personally put Stevensons on the same level as Bolger,
                        and
                        > > others. So I think you are moving in the right direction.
                        > >
                        > > Boats are about what you want out of them. The more you can
                        narrow
                        > > the brief the better. Micros are getting a little dated. A lot
                        > has
                        > > changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't
                        think
                        > the
                        > > bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right
                        answer
                        > for
                        > > someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike
                        some
                        > PB
                        > > designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the
                        > same
                        > > bang for the buck.
                        > >
                        > > Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly
                        > as
                        > > this one. I would build, and have, many of the smaller box
                        > designs,
                        > > but I don't see the reason to configure a larger boat this way
                        > today.
                        > > When I started out building boats 30 years ago, so many tools
                        were
                        > > either unthought of or extremely expensive. Raw plywood was very
                        > > cheap, in good quality. And the prefered sheathing for ply and
                        > even
                        > > strip boats at the time was fiberglass resin. For example. a
                        > quality
                        > > General planer cost about 70% of a Volvo, in the mid 70s. now you
                        > can
                        > > pick one up for the cost of 2-4 fills of the gas tank. Free
                        online
                        > > design programs were not even on the horizon. And every decade
                        has
                        > > brought major changes. Whether tackling traditional projects,
                        like
                        > > planking, or modern designs, it's all so much easier, not to
                        > mention
                        > > the information revolution, that I really fail to see the
                        practical
                        > > sideo of a Micro any longer.
                        > >
                        >
                      • Brian Anderson
                        I have always thought that mostly, if one wants to go sailing, one should buy a boat. If one wants to build a boat, then one should build a boat. If you
                        Message 11 of 21 , Nov 29, 2007
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                          I have always thought that mostly, if one wants to go sailing, one
                          should buy a boat. If one wants to build a boat, then one should build
                          a boat. If you average it out on an hourly basis, it works out much
                          cheaper than playing golf or even going to the movies.

                          I also think model building is a great idea, and if you take the time
                          to build a nice one in wood, it can make a great gift for the kid or
                          grandkid or whatever.

                          If I were going to build something like the Micro, I would be tempted
                          to steer more toward a Michalak Musicbox 2 or 3. It is essentially the
                          same boat, but is maybe more practical in some ways -- faster to rig,
                          lighter to transport because of the water ballast, less draft,
                          beachable flat bottom, etc.

                          As for experience, you don't need any boatbuilding experience to build
                          these boats, but it would help a lot if you have the basic woodworking
                          tools and know how to use them. If not, I would build a small canoe or
                          a dory or something simple to kind of get things figured out before
                          launching into a Micro or something similar.

                          Cheers, Brian





                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tri Robinson" <gzusinme@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hello, was wondering if I could get some advice from you guys with
                          > > experience. I am looking to build a sailboat, I dont have any real
                          > > experience but looking to get started. I originally was intending to
                          > > order the weekender plans froms stevens projects. However I then saw
                          >
                          >
                          > I don't personally put Stevensons on the same level as Bolger, and
                          > others. So I think you are moving in the right direction.
                          >
                          > Boats are about what you want out of them. The more you can narrow
                          > the brief the better. Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has
                          > changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't think the
                          > bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right answer for
                          > someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike some PB
                          > designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the same
                          > bang for the buck.
                          >
                          > Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly as
                          > this one. I would build, and have, many of the smaller box designs,
                          > but I don't see the reason to configure a larger boat this way today.
                          > When I started out building boats 30 years ago, so many tools were
                          > either unthought of or extremely expensive. Raw plywood was very
                          > cheap, in good quality. And the prefered sheathing for ply and even
                          > strip boats at the time was fiberglass resin. For example. a quality
                          > General planer cost about 70% of a Volvo, in the mid 70s. now you can
                          > pick one up for the cost of 2-4 fills of the gas tank. Free online
                          > design programs were not even on the horizon. And every decade has
                          > brought major changes. Whether tackling traditional projects, like
                          > planking, or modern designs, it's all so much easier, not to mention
                          > the information revolution, that I really fail to see the practical
                          > sideo of a Micro any longer.
                          >
                        • mason smith
                          I m interested in these comments about Micro not necessarily being up to date or practical. I have had two Drascombes, two Birdwatchers, and a Dovekie, and
                          Message 12 of 21 , Nov 30, 2007
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                            I'm interested in these comments about Micro not necessarily being up to date or practical. I have had two Drascombes, two Birdwatchers, and a Dovekie, and recently completed a Micro somebody else had built and used with out keel or sailiing rig. It has endeared itself to me in the little use I could make of it before the end of the sailing season here (Adirondacks), and I tend to think it's going to prove my favorite of all these, because it packs more space and is more comfortable. Once I got the trailer right for that new ballast keel, so that the boat became as easy to launch and retrieve as a Birdwatcher (almost) I began to think that a shallow-keel keelboat wasn't a bad thing at all. And for the inexperienced sailow, who may not delight in the liveliness of, say, a Birdwatcher with the Solent sloop rig, or the enclosed sailing position of same, Micro would be very steady and reassuring. Doesn't seem in any way outdone by more recent developments in plywood construction, to me.

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Bruce Hallman
                            ... To say the obvious, it all depends! Speaking personally, my Micro was not at all practical siting on a trailer in my driveway, and then became exceedingly
                            Message 13 of 21 , Nov 30, 2007
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                              On Nov 30, 2007 9:07 AM, mason smith <masonsmith@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I'm interested in these comments about Micro not necessarily being up to
                              > date or practical.

                              To say the obvious, it all depends!

                              Speaking personally, my Micro was not at all practical siting on a
                              trailer in my driveway, and then became exceedingly practical the
                              moment I got a coveted marina berth walking distance from my office in
                              downtown San Francisco. Ditto for lots of other dualities; not
                              practical for cross oceans, but plenty practical for local sailing,
                              etc..

                              All these discussions must start with the question: What kind of
                              boating to you have in mind?
                            • Kenneth Grome
                              ... My feeling after reading the guy s opinion about Micro is that he has had no personal experience with the boat and simply doesn t like its appearance, or
                              Message 14 of 21 , Dec 1, 2007
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                                > I'm interested in these comments
                                > about Micro not necessarily being up
                                > to date or practical

                                My feeling after reading the guy's opinion about Micro is that he has
                                had no personal experience with the boat and simply doesn't like its
                                appearance, or maybe he just has different personal goals for a boat
                                that Micro can fulfill ... so why put any stock in his "opinions"?

                                Most who build Micro's enjoy the boats and are glad they have them, and
                                that's all that should matter.

                                If you really want some useful information, the best sources might be
                                people who have owned and sailed the boats, then sold them. These are
                                the folks who might tell you "The boat sucked so I got rid of it" or "I
                                wish I never sold it because it was ideal for me".

                                Sincerely,
                                Ken Grome
                                Bagacay Boatworks
                                www.bagacayboatworks.com
                              • Peter Lenihan
                                ... wrote: Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has ... the ... for ... PB ... same ... Weeelllll I don t know about that.The water certainly hasn t
                                Message 15 of 21 , Dec 2, 2007
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                                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@...>
                                  wrote:
                                  Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has
                                  > changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't think
                                  the
                                  > bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right answer
                                  for
                                  > someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike some
                                  PB
                                  > designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the
                                  same
                                  > bang for the buck.
                                  >
                                  > Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly as
                                  > this one.


                                  Weeelllll I don't know about that.The water certainly hasn't changed
                                  all that much nor has the wind and they've been around for a very very
                                  long time :-)

                                  For max interior volume, it is hard to beat a box, any box.
                                  Information technology has advanced and there are indeed oodles of new
                                  fresh designs out there but,and here is the challenge; using only 14
                                  sheets of plywood, produce a boat with handsome rugged good looks( I
                                  know,not eveyones' cup of tea), make it self-righing,self-
                                  rescuing,capable of comfortably sailing in all but the strongest of
                                  winds( well up into the small craft warning zone),able to be
                                  provisioned with stores for two for at least a week at a time,give it
                                  a cabin not sliced in two buy a centerboard case and with a comfy
                                  sitting headroom cabin.Make it railerable.
                                  I'll bet the computer designers will be mighty pissed off when the
                                  machine keeps spitting out a) a box or b) a shape so "tortured" only a
                                  professional would attempt to build it.
                                  In the end,however, one should keep in mind the origins of the MICRO
                                  design. It was intended to be a boat easily built by non-boatbuilders,
                                  a relaxing and forgiving day-sailor which could handle an occasional
                                  over-night and at the end of the day be brought home and put to bed
                                  right beside the car in the drive way, while not costing a small
                                  fortune to build in relatively little time.This bare bones brief, I
                                  believe, was met with the MICRO, and many of those same requirements
                                  still hold considerable allure for young and not so young folks
                                  seeking to be on the water in a boat wrought of their own hands.

                                  I know there have been some fine summer days when I wished I still had
                                  mine in the water:-)(are you reading this Nels?...in the water!)

                                  O.K., enough of my nonsense. I was and remain a sucker for the Micro!!


                                  Sincerely,

                                  Peter Lenihan...............
                                • graeme19121984
                                  Centennial II. 13. sheets. !!
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Centennial II.
                                    13. sheets. !!


                                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <peterlenihan@...> wrote:

                                    > here is the challenge; using only 14 sheets of plywood, produce a
                                    >boat with handsome rugged good looks( I know,not eveyones' cup of
                                    >tea), make it self-righing,self-rescuing,capable of comfortably
                                    >sailing in all but the strongest of winds( well up into the small
                                    >craft warning zone),able to be provisioned with stores for two for at
                                    >least a week at a time,give it a cabin not sliced in two buy a
                                    >centerboard case and with a comfy sitting headroom cabin.Make it
                                    >railerable.
                                  • Peter Lenihan
                                    ... Ah,pretty good that one Graeme! But, I forgot to mention with the Micro, a sailing draft of not more then what,18 :-) And while I m at it,a sailing rig
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "graeme19121984" <graeme19121984@...>
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Centennial II.
                                      > 13. sheets. !!

                                      Ah,pretty good that one Graeme! But, I forgot to mention with the
                                      Micro, a sailing draft of not more then what,18" :-)
                                      And while I'm at it,a sailing rig not encumbered by peak sprits:-D

                                      Sincerely,

                                      Peter Lenihan, scatching his head for more minor differences as the
                                      snow flies from our first snow storm of the
                                      year...yippee....yahoo....and boo!!
                                    • mike weekes
                                      There ia a 25 foot tug I d like to build - has anyone ever heard of a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25 long and 8 6 wide with perhaps 2 foot draw?
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with perhaps 2 foot draw?

                                        yellowstone_mike@...

                                        Peter Lenihan <peterlenihan@...> wrote:
                                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@...>
                                        wrote:
                                        Micros are getting a little dated. A lot has
                                        > changed in the last 20-30 years of boatbuilding, and I don't think
                                        the
                                        > bang for the buck is there today. They are still the right answer
                                        for
                                        > someone, and they haven't changed from what they were, unlike some
                                        PB
                                        > designs since. Built to current standards, there just isn't the
                                        same
                                        > bang for the buck.
                                        >
                                        > Today, there really isn't as much reason to build a box as costly as
                                        > this one.

                                        Weeelllll I don't know about that.The water certainly hasn't changed
                                        all that much nor has the wind and they've been around for a very very
                                        long time :-)

                                        For max interior volume, it is hard to beat a box, any box.
                                        Information technology has advanced and there are indeed oodles of new
                                        fresh designs out there but,and here is the challenge; using only 14
                                        sheets of plywood, produce a boat with handsome rugged good looks( I
                                        know,not eveyones' cup of tea), make it self-righing,self-
                                        rescuing,capable of comfortably sailing in all but the strongest of
                                        winds( well up into the small craft warning zone),able to be
                                        provisioned with stores for two for at least a week at a time,give it
                                        a cabin not sliced in two buy a centerboard case and with a comfy
                                        sitting headroom cabin.Make it railerable.
                                        I'll bet the computer designers will be mighty pissed off when the
                                        machine keeps spitting out a) a box or b) a shape so "tortured" only a
                                        professional would attempt to build it.
                                        In the end,however, one should keep in mind the origins of the MICRO
                                        design. It was intended to be a boat easily built by non-boatbuilders,
                                        a relaxing and forgiving day-sailor which could handle an occasional
                                        over-night and at the end of the day be brought home and put to bed
                                        right beside the car in the drive way, while not costing a small
                                        fortune to build in relatively little time.This bare bones brief, I
                                        believe, was met with the MICRO, and many of those same requirements
                                        still hold considerable allure for young and not so young folks
                                        seeking to be on the water in a boat wrought of their own hands.

                                        I know there have been some fine summer days when I wished I still had
                                        mine in the water:-)(are you reading this Nels?...in the water!)

                                        O.K., enough of my nonsense. I was and remain a sucker for the Micro!!

                                        Sincerely,

                                        Peter Lenihan...............






                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Kenneth Grome
                                        Stitch and glue boats can be built in any size. Most larger boats use frames, molds, bulkheads, etc. to hold the shape during construction. What boat are you
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          Stitch and glue boats can be built in any size. Most larger boats use
                                          frames, molds, bulkheads, etc. to hold the shape during construction.
                                          What boat are you talking about?

                                          Sincerely,
                                          Ken Grome
                                          Bagacay Boatworks
                                          www.bagacayboatworks.com




                                          > There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of a
                                          > 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with
                                          > perhaps 2 foot draw?
                                        • Peter Lenihan
                                          ... a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25 long and 8 6 wide with perhaps 2 foot draw? ... Sam Devlin has two lovely stitch-n-glue tugs ,that look like
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Dec 3, 2007
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, mike weekes <yellowstone_mike@...>
                                            wrote:
                                            >
                                            > There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of
                                            a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with
                                            perhaps 2 foot draw?
                                            >
                                            > yellowstone_mike@...


                                            Sam Devlin has two lovely stitch-n-glue "tugs",that look like this:

                                            http://www.devlinboat.com/godzilla2.jpg

                                            His web site has more pictures and information.

                                            Sincerely,

                                            Peter Lenihan, wandering in a winter wonderland...........
                                          • Harry James
                                            His Kingfisher also http://www.devlinboat.com/dckingfisher26.htm HJ ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Dec 4, 2007
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              His Kingfisher also

                                              http://www.devlinboat.com/dckingfisher26.htm

                                              HJ

                                              Peter Lenihan wrote:
                                              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, mike weekes <yellowstone_mike@...>
                                              > wrote:
                                              >
                                              >> There ia a 25 foot tug I'd like to build - has anyone ever heard of
                                              >>
                                              > a 25 foot tack n tape style as large as 25' long and 8'6" wide with
                                              > perhaps 2 foot draw?
                                              >
                                              >>
                                              >> yellowstone_mike@...
                                              >>
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > Sam Devlin has two lovely stitch-n-glue "tugs",that look like this:
                                              >
                                              > http://www.devlinboat.com/godzilla2.jpg
                                              >
                                              > His web site has more pictures and information.
                                              >
                                              > Sincerely,
                                              >
                                              > Peter Lenihan, wandering in a winter wonderland...........
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > Bolger rules!!!
                                              > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
                                              > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                                              > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                                              > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                                              > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                              > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                              > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                              > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >


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