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Re: Puget Sound

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  • Chris Crandall
    Posted by: Kristine Bennett femmpaws@yahoo.com femmpaws ... I don t know--8-10 foots waves are too extreme for my Teal, for example. Keep in mind that many
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 12, 2007
      Posted by: "Kristine Bennett" femmpaws@... femmpaws
      > Yes a lot of people think do to Puget Sound being well enclosed the water doesn't get all that rough.... Off West Seattle I've seen 8 to 10 foot waves heading north up the sound... I was also on one of the ferries in said storm.
      >
      > Would I want to be out in that kind of stuff in a small sailboat? NO! But I'm very sure any of the small boats that Phil has designed would handle it the bigger question would you?

      I don't know--8-10 foots waves are too extreme for my Teal, for example.
      Keep in mind that many of the sailboats have no particular provision for
      shortening sail.

      I've never seen 8-10 foot waves on Puget Sound, in my memory (but I
      moved away a few years ago). Five-footers, though, for sure, and they
      are *plenty*. I used to go down to the Sound at the south end of
      Lincoln Park and watch them smash into the WPA sea wall (wow!).

      I'll be there for sailing this winter.

      -Chris
    • Bruce Hallman
      ... An old friend of mine is an ex-seaman on the ferries, with lots of first hand experience with Puget Sound waters. His comments on those photos is copied
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 12, 2007
        On Nov 12, 2007 5:54 AM, Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've never seen 8-10 foot waves on Puget Sound, in my memory (but I
        > -Chris


        An old friend of mine is an ex-seaman on the ferries, with lots of
        first hand experience with Puget Sound waters. His comments on those
        photos is copied below:


        =========pasted text below =====

        These kinds of very rare inland "seas" result from a strong southerly
        winter blow acting against an opposite tidal current. Upon departure
        we would usually run parallel to the wave action, in the "trough" (the
        first two photos) until we could get behind a headland where the seas
        were calmer so we could make whatever turn was needed to make the
        dock. This kind of action was much more common on the Port Townsend
        route than "down sound." Sometimes the turn was required where there
        was no headland to get behind (as in this case) and then you see the
        action captured in the rest of the photos. Anyway, while cars have
        been known to get moved around in this weather much of the water
        action you see is spray (although from the looks of the scuppers there
        is a significant amount of "green water" on deck) and it is unlikely
        that cars got forced into each other - although that has happened on
        very rare occasions. Anyway, it is good to relive my days on the
        water.
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