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Gypsy glass schedule

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  • ksapelkin
    Hello, The Gypsy instructions call for 10 oz. glass on the the outside of the the hull and paint only on the inside. Would it be an improvement to glass the
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 5, 2007
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      Hello,

      The Gypsy instructions call for 10 oz. glass on the the outside of the the
      hull and paint only on the inside.

      Would it be an improvement to glass the inside as well?

      To keep weight down I thought to use 10 oz. glass on the bottom and 4 oz
      on the bilge and side panels. Inside and out. Likewise 4 oz on the
      framing. 10 oz taping throughout.

      I settled on Hydrotek for the plywood.

      Thanks.

      Kirill
    • Bill
      Kirill, Ten oz. glass!? Wow. I used 4 oz. on the outside of my Gypsy and coated the inside with epoxy resin (and paint). My Gypsy is now 10 years old. If
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 8, 2007
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        Kirill,
        Ten oz. glass!? Wow. I used 4 oz. on the outside of my Gypsy and
        coated the inside with epoxy resin (and paint). My Gypsy is now 10
        years old. If you are beaching your boat a lot, the thicker
        fiberglass might be worth it. I repeatedly wore thru the glass on
        the "nose" of my Gypsy (the very forward-most part of the bottom
        panel), and eventually glued a piece of aluminum there, to take the
        brunt of beaching. The aluminum worked well.

        I've stored my Gypsy outside, upside down for most of her 10 years.
        The 4 oz. glass has held up fine. The one winter I stored her
        upright (with a cover), the cover leaked and she got some water
        inside. I caught it in time, so she wasn't subjected to repeated
        freeze-thaw cycles. Not a good thing, but she survived OK. If your
        boat will regularly have water sitting inside, it may be prudent to
        use fiberglass on the inside too. There's a recent Diablo demise to
        support this suggestion.

        Ten oz. seems like a lot, but it depends on how rough you plan to be.
        It's a great boat, by the way. It will row straighter with a short
        skeg on the bottom. It sails a little tender, and it death rolls
        when it jibes, but it's a fantastic boat to sail, and you'll get
        plenty of compliments.

        Bill, in Ohio

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "ksapelkin" <iiqtub5086@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > The Gypsy instructions call for 10 oz. glass on the the outside of
        the the
        > hull and paint only on the inside.
        >
        > Would it be an improvement to glass the inside as well?
        >
        > To keep weight down I thought to use 10 oz. glass on the bottom and
        4 oz
        > on the bilge and side panels. Inside and out. Likewise 4 oz on the
        > framing. 10 oz taping throughout.
        >
        > I settled on Hydrotek for the plywood.
        >
        > Thanks.
        >
        > Kirill
        >
      • ksapelkin
        Hello Bill, I agree. It seemed like overkill to me, but to quote chapter and verse, Payson: Build the new instant boats page 48: Twelve yards of 10-ounce
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 9, 2007
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          Hello Bill,

          I agree. It seemed like overkill to me, but to quote chapter and
          verse,

          Payson: Build the new instant boats page 48:

          "Twelve yards of 10-ounce 38-inch cloth will cover her hull
          completely."

          Further:

          "When you're glassing Gypsy's sides, you'll find that a strip of 38-
          inch cloth will reach from one sheer across her bottom and nearly to
          the opposite chine."

          If Gypsy is about 5 yards long and instructions call for 12 yards,
          that seems to indicate that the bottom ends up with TWO layers of 10
          ounce glass.

          BTW he calls for some additional glass at the stem and forefoot to
          protect the boat when beaching.

          Does the skeg detract from the sailing performance?

          Kirill


          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <kingw@...> wrote:
          >
          > Kirill,
          > Ten oz. glass!? Wow. I used 4 oz. on the outside of my Gypsy and
          > coated the inside with epoxy resin (and paint). My Gypsy is now 10
          > years old. If you are beaching your boat a lot, the thicker
          > fiberglass might be worth it. I repeatedly wore thru the glass on
          > the "nose" of my Gypsy (the very forward-most part of the bottom
          > panel), and eventually glued a piece of aluminum there, to take the
          > brunt of beaching. The aluminum worked well.
          >
          > I've stored my Gypsy outside, upside down for most of her 10
          years.
          > The 4 oz. glass has held up fine. The one winter I stored her
          > upright (with a cover), the cover leaked and she got some water
          > inside. I caught it in time, so she wasn't subjected to repeated
          > freeze-thaw cycles. Not a good thing, but she survived OK. If
          your
          > boat will regularly have water sitting inside, it may be prudent to
          > use fiberglass on the inside too. There's a recent Diablo demise
          to
          > support this suggestion.
          >
          > Ten oz. seems like a lot, but it depends on how rough you plan to
          be.
          > It's a great boat, by the way. It will row straighter with a short
          > skeg on the bottom. It sails a little tender, and it death rolls
          > when it jibes, but it's a fantastic boat to sail, and you'll get
          > plenty of compliments.
          >
          > Bill, in Ohio
          >
          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "ksapelkin" <iiqtub5086@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello,
          > >
          > > The Gypsy instructions call for 10 oz. glass on the the outside
          of
          > the the
          > > hull and paint only on the inside.
          > >
          > > Would it be an improvement to glass the inside as well?
          > >
          > > To keep weight down I thought to use 10 oz. glass on the bottom
          and
          > 4 oz
          > > on the bilge and side panels. Inside and out. Likewise 4 oz on
          the
          > > framing. 10 oz taping throughout.
          > >
          > > I settled on Hydrotek for the plywood.
          > >
          > > Thanks.
          > >
          > > Kirill
          > >
          >
        • Bill
          Kirill, I never added a skeg, as I became busy building my Long Micro. My Gypsy gets very little use these days. I suggest that you build your Gypsy to spec
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 10, 2007
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            Kirill,
            I never added a skeg, as I became busy building my Long Micro. My
            Gypsy gets very little use these days. I suggest that you build your
            Gypsy to spec and try it out. I found that it rowed well, until I
            started rowing at top speed. At top speed, the boat will suddenly
            jerk/turn 90 degrees (port or starboard, as she sees fit) and
            basically slide to a stop. Doesn't make the rower look proficient,
            and impedes progress. I do not recall if keeping the dagger board down
            helped it track straighter- I probably tried it and it didn't work.

            One day I got caught out in some pretty horrible winds and waves and
            found myself rowing frantically, into the wind and waves, for the
            dock. I rowed with all my might as spray washed over the bow.
            Knuckles were white, mouth was dry, swear-words filled the air.

            Although I was making very slow progress over-ground, the water
            pushing past the hull was enough to cause my Gypsy to twist suddenly
            side-to-side; putting me broadside to the waves. This happened
            repeatedly and it wasn't fun. The harder I rowed into the wind, the
            more it happened.

            If I get back into sailing my Gypsy again, I'll add a short skeg. I
            don't see how it would harm tracking. There was a discussion about
            Gypsy skegs on this group and someone added a skeg. A search should
            locate the discussion. I think Susan was involved? Anyone else have
            experience with skeggin' their Gypsy?

            I don't want to be negative about the Gypsy. It's a truly great boat
            and I had a blast building and sailing mine.

            One last tidbit of advice. Try cutting your daggerboard and rudder at
            45 degrees to the grain of your plywood. I cut mine along the grain
            (that is, the plywood grain runs up-and-down, and side-to-side in my
            foils). I saw someone cut their daggerboard with the grain running at
            45 degree angles; it's supposed to keep the foils from warping. My
            dagger board has since warped a bit but it's been around for 10 years now.

            Please keep us posted with your progress. Pictures are always appreciated.

            Bill, in Ohio

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "ksapelkin" <iiqtub5086@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello Bill,
            >
            > I agree. It seemed like overkill to me, but to quote chapter and
            > verse,
            >
            > Payson: Build the new instant boats page 48:
            >
            > "Twelve yards of 10-ounce 38-inch cloth will cover her hull
            > completely."
            >
            > Further:
            >
            > "When you're glassing Gypsy's sides, you'll find that a strip of 38-
            > inch cloth will reach from one sheer across her bottom and nearly to
            > the opposite chine."
            >
            > If Gypsy is about 5 yards long and instructions call for 12 yards,
            > that seems to indicate that the bottom ends up with TWO layers of 10
            > ounce glass.
            >
            > BTW he calls for some additional glass at the stem and forefoot to
            > protect the boat when beaching.
            >
            > Does the skeg detract from the sailing performance?
            >
            > Kirill
            >
            >
          • paulthober
            I built a Gypsy some years ago and covered the outside with 6 oz. glass set in epoxy. Epoxy and paint on the inside. Seemed like more than adequate. I added a
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 31, 2007
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              I built a Gypsy some years ago and covered the outside with 6 oz.
              glass set in epoxy. Epoxy and paint on the inside. Seemed like more
              than adequate.

              I added a deck and large water-tight compartments to make for easy
              self-rescue for after the aforementioned inevitable death roll swim.

              Enjoy your Gypsy - it is a fine design.

              Romayne
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