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Re: [bolger] Re: Why are Micro plans so hard to get ?

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  • derbyrm
    Some thoughts from a person of 73 years. There comes a time in a relationship when one no longer tries to fix one s partner. Que sera, sera. If one
    Message 1 of 42 , Sep 13, 2007
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      Some thoughts from a person of 73 years.

      There comes a time in a relationship when one no longer tries to "fix" one's partner. "Que sera, sera."

      If one touches a nerve, one gets a quick response. I sent a fax which cited a problem in their marketing of their cure for the fishing industry. Within hours I got a loooong phone call. The fact that I was building a Chebacco was really incidental and "just for nice." I think it comes down to that word which is unspeakable for the "entitled" generation -- discipline.

      Yes, I was raised to believe that one's word was gospel. If you agreed to deliver X for Y and received Y, then you did whatever was required to make the delivery. Bygone times, I fear.

      Roger
      derbyrm@...
      http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: adventures_in_astrophotography
      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2007 6:27 PM
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Why are Micro plans so hard to get ?


      Bruce,

      > Regarding the long waits for commissioned work, that is something
      > else. Still this is not like hiring a mechanical technician, it is
      > more like hiring an artist. You are buying 'inspiration', and
      > inspiration is hard to catch in a bottle. I suspect you do not really
      > want an uninspired Bolger design.

      No matter how I describe this issue or respond to your comments, there
      is sure to be a chorus of like responses implying, subtly or not, that
      I'm a whiner who just needs to be patient. Such is the nature of
      written comments without the context of personal interaction. Yours is
      only one example of the persistent notion that PB&F are merely waiting
      for the right inspiration to produce the artwork that will become our
      commission. This romantic vision of the commission process may be true
      for some of their clients; it is a far cry from our case.

      We were not sold inspiration. We were sold a specific design concept in
      response to the inspiration we supplied in 2001 with our wish list. We
      accepted their proposal to develop the concept into a buildable design
      in a specified period of time (10-15 months) and paid thousands to
      further that effort. PB&F have been very clear about the reasons for
      their delays in completing commissioned work and never once have they
      mentioned inspiration being a cause. In fact, they have openly
      questioned their own business ethics in this regard (in the opening
      Messing About in Fishing Boats article, I believe).

      This last point is a valid issue from our perspective, particularly as
      numerous faxes over the years have gone unanswered, and delays have
      always been communicated long after the fact. For example, we just
      learned in July that they stopped work on all commissions in Sept of
      last year - by reading it in MAIB (same article as above). This
      stoppage happened only a few days after they had just called to tell us
      they were working on our design again and would have it finished last
      winter. It would have been nice to hear the bad news from them at that
      time instead of reading about it in MAIB months later.

      I hate to sound like I'm running down an 80-year old man and his wife,
      but I want people to understand that there are real issues with their
      business practices, and it's naive to write it all off to an artists'
      inspiration or lack thereof. Besides, he was only 74 when we signed up.

      Despite what it probably seems like in this forum, we have never once
      complained about the delays to PB&F, and in fact have been the model of
      patience for 6-1/2 years. We remain patient and hopeful that
      eventually our commission will be completed.

      Jon Kolb
      www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • derbyrm
      Some thoughts from a person of 73 years. There comes a time in a relationship when one no longer tries to fix one s partner. Que sera, sera. If one
      Message 42 of 42 , Sep 13, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Some thoughts from a person of 73 years.

        There comes a time in a relationship when one no longer tries to "fix" one's partner. "Que sera, sera."

        If one touches a nerve, one gets a quick response. I sent a fax which cited a problem in their marketing of their cure for the fishing industry. Within hours I got a loooong phone call. The fact that I was building a Chebacco was really incidental and "just for nice." I think it comes down to that word which is unspeakable for the "entitled" generation -- discipline.

        Yes, I was raised to believe that one's word was gospel. If you agreed to deliver X for Y and received Y, then you did whatever was required to make the delivery. Bygone times, I fear.

        Roger
        derbyrm@...
        http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: adventures_in_astrophotography
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2007 6:27 PM
        Subject: [bolger] Re: Why are Micro plans so hard to get ?


        Bruce,

        > Regarding the long waits for commissioned work, that is something
        > else. Still this is not like hiring a mechanical technician, it is
        > more like hiring an artist. You are buying 'inspiration', and
        > inspiration is hard to catch in a bottle. I suspect you do not really
        > want an uninspired Bolger design.

        No matter how I describe this issue or respond to your comments, there
        is sure to be a chorus of like responses implying, subtly or not, that
        I'm a whiner who just needs to be patient. Such is the nature of
        written comments without the context of personal interaction. Yours is
        only one example of the persistent notion that PB&F are merely waiting
        for the right inspiration to produce the artwork that will become our
        commission. This romantic vision of the commission process may be true
        for some of their clients; it is a far cry from our case.

        We were not sold inspiration. We were sold a specific design concept in
        response to the inspiration we supplied in 2001 with our wish list. We
        accepted their proposal to develop the concept into a buildable design
        in a specified period of time (10-15 months) and paid thousands to
        further that effort. PB&F have been very clear about the reasons for
        their delays in completing commissioned work and never once have they
        mentioned inspiration being a cause. In fact, they have openly
        questioned their own business ethics in this regard (in the opening
        Messing About in Fishing Boats article, I believe).

        This last point is a valid issue from our perspective, particularly as
        numerous faxes over the years have gone unanswered, and delays have
        always been communicated long after the fact. For example, we just
        learned in July that they stopped work on all commissions in Sept of
        last year - by reading it in MAIB (same article as above). This
        stoppage happened only a few days after they had just called to tell us
        they were working on our design again and would have it finished last
        winter. It would have been nice to hear the bad news from them at that
        time instead of reading about it in MAIB months later.

        I hate to sound like I'm running down an 80-year old man and his wife,
        but I want people to understand that there are real issues with their
        business practices, and it's naive to write it all off to an artists'
        inspiration or lack thereof. Besides, he was only 74 when we signed up.

        Despite what it probably seems like in this forum, we have never once
        complained about the delays to PB&F, and in fact have been the model of
        patience for 6-1/2 years. We remain patient and hopeful that
        eventually our commission will be completed.

        Jon Kolb
        www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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