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5.2 mm luan Gypsy

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  • ksapelkin
    Hello, Just bought some 5.2 mm luan from Home Depot to construct a Gypsy. Now am having second thoughts. It feels pretty flimsy. I thought to encapsulate in
    Message 1 of 19 , Sep 7, 2007
      Hello,

      Just bought some 5.2 mm luan from Home Depot to construct a Gypsy.
      Now am having second thoughts. It feels pretty flimsy.

      I thought to encapsulate in epoxy and glass both sides of the hull,
      frames etc. Maybe 10 oz glass on the inside bottom and 4 oz on the
      sides and frames. Or 4 oz all over the inside.

      Is this plywood ok for this application?

      Thanks,

      Kirill
    • GarthAB
      I ve built many boats with luan, and had mixed results with it -- some offcut pieces I left out in the rain and mud for years never delaminated. But a pile of
      Message 2 of 19 , Sep 9, 2007
        I've built many boats with luan, and had mixed results with it -- some
        offcut pieces I left out in the rain and mud for years never
        delaminated. But a pile of whole sheets I had stored in a barn got an
        intermittent rain leak dripping on them -- and they delaminated and
        blistered and nearly fell to pieces.

        However, none of my luan boats are falling apart yet, either because I
        was lucky enough to have not used the bad stuff, or because glue,
        epoxy, fiberglass, and paint protect it just enough.

        If only there was a way of telling the good luan from the bad -- but
        both came from the same lumberyard, and had no markings, and all
        looked more or less the same, so I just had to go on faith.

        My latest thinking, after having used it quite a lot, and even with
        all my luan boats still intact -- is that luan isn't worth the risk.
        It would be heartbreaking to see delamination ruin a boat I'd spent
        many hours building.

        Garth


        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "ksapelkin" <iiqtub5086@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > Just bought some 5.2 mm luan from Home Depot to construct a Gypsy.
        > Now am having second thoughts. It feels pretty flimsy.
        >
        > I thought to encapsulate in epoxy and glass both sides of the hull,
        > frames etc. Maybe 10 oz glass on the inside bottom and 4 oz on the
        > sides and frames. Or 4 oz all over the inside.
        >
        > Is this plywood ok for this application?
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Kirill
        >
      • mkriley48
        hi, I did boat repair for many years in florida and a very large portion of my income was derived from removing luan from boats. many times the stuff
        Message 3 of 19 , Sep 9, 2007
          hi,
          I did boat repair for many years in florida and a very large portion
          of my income was derived from removing luan from boats. many times the
          stuff delaminiated so badly it it resembled the pages of a book. Also
          the wood itself is about the most rot prone going. It composts
          readily. all the oriental boats have to under go massive
          reconstruction due to plywood failure.
          a parting note is that home depot ALWAYS buys from the cheapest vender.
          mike






          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "ksapelkin" <iiqtub5086@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello,
          >
          > Just bought some 5.2 mm luan from Home Depot to construct a Gypsy.
          > Now am having second thoughts. It feels pretty flimsy.
          >
          > I thought to encapsulate in epoxy and glass both sides of the hull,
          > frames etc. Maybe 10 oz glass on the inside bottom and 4 oz on the
          > sides and frames. Or 4 oz all over the inside.
          >
          > Is this plywood ok for this application?
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Kirill
          >
        • Robert du Domaine
          I suggest that the luan is probably not right for a boat. Use some good ACX on the bottom and invest in some good marine ocume for the bilges and sides. The
          Message 4 of 19 , Sep 9, 2007
            I suggest that the luan is probably not right for a boat. Use some
            good ACX on the bottom and invest in some good marine ocume for the
            bilges and sides. The cost of the plywood is a small percentage of
            the total boat cost. On the bottom put the
            A side inside and seal it with fiberglass or penetrating epoxy or it
            will check soon.
          • Tim Anderson
            Materials costs are the smallest component of our projects; the value of the irreplaceable hours of our lives are the most expensive. It only makes sense to
            Message 5 of 19 , Sep 9, 2007
              Materials costs are the smallest component of our projects; the value of the
              irreplaceable hours of our lives are the most expensive. It only makes sense
              to use the best possible materials. My experience has shown that the 3-ply
              5.2 luan is not worthy due to delamination. Tim P Anderson



              _____

              From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              GarthAB
              Sent: Sunday, September 09, 2007 6:27 AM
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [bolger] Re: 5.2 mm luan Gypsy



              I've built many boats with luan, and had mixed results with it -- some
              offcut pieces I left out in the rain and mud for years never
              delaminated. But a pile of whole sheets I had stored in a barn got an
              intermittent rain leak dripping on them -- and they delaminated and
              blistered and nearly fell to pieces.

              However, none of my luan boats are falling apart yet, either because I
              was lucky enough to have not used the bad stuff, or because glue,
              epoxy, fiberglass, and paint protect it just enough.

              If only there was a way of telling the good luan from the bad -- but
              both came from the same lumberyard, and had no markings, and all
              looked more or less the same, so I just had to go on faith.

              My latest thinking, after having used it quite a lot, and even with
              all my luan boats still intact -- is that luan isn't worth the risk.
              It would be heartbreaking to see delamination ruin a boat I'd spent
              many hours building.

              Garth

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com,
              "ksapelkin" <iiqtub5086@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello,
              >
              > Just bought some 5.2 mm luan from Home Depot to construct a Gypsy.
              > Now am having second thoughts. It feels pretty flimsy.
              >
              > I thought to encapsulate in epoxy and glass both sides of the hull,
              > frames etc. Maybe 10 oz glass on the inside bottom and 4 oz on the
              > sides and frames. Or 4 oz all over the inside.
              >
              > Is this plywood ok for this application?
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > Kirill
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • ksapelkin
              Thanks all for the advice. I thought that if luan was good enough then there would be no sense not to use it. But if there s a chance it would fail.....
              Message 6 of 19 , Sep 9, 2007
                Thanks all for the advice.

                I thought that if luan was good enough then there would be no sense
                not to use it. But if there's a chance it would fail.....

                Anyway, I won't use luan.

                Maybe meranti or okouma.

                Kirill

                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "GarthAB" <garth@...> wrote:
                >
                > I've built many boats with luan, and had mixed results with it --
                some
                > offcut pieces I left out in the rain and mud for years never
                > delaminated. But a pile of whole sheets I had stored in a barn got
                an
                > intermittent rain leak dripping on them -- and they delaminated and
                > blistered and nearly fell to pieces.
                >
                > However, none of my luan boats are falling apart yet, either
                because I
                > was lucky enough to have not used the bad stuff, or because glue,
                > epoxy, fiberglass, and paint protect it just enough.
                >
                > If only there was a way of telling the good luan from the bad -- but
                > both came from the same lumberyard, and had no markings, and all
                > looked more or less the same, so I just had to go on faith.
                >
                > My latest thinking, after having used it quite a lot, and even with
                > all my luan boats still intact -- is that luan isn't worth the risk.
                > It would be heartbreaking to see delamination ruin a boat I'd spent
                > many hours building.
                >
                > Garth
                >
                >
                > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "ksapelkin" <iiqtub5086@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hello,
                > >
                > > Just bought some 5.2 mm luan from Home Depot to construct a
                Gypsy.
                > > Now am having second thoughts. It feels pretty flimsy.
                > >
                > > I thought to encapsulate in epoxy and glass both sides of the
                hull,
                > > frames etc. Maybe 10 oz glass on the inside bottom and 4 oz on
                the
                > > sides and frames. Or 4 oz all over the inside.
                > >
                > > Is this plywood ok for this application?
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > >
                > > Kirill
                > >
                >
              • Bob Slimak
                Here s how I ve determined the good luan, but with the possibility of losing the cost of one sheet. When they have a stack of what looks good, meaning the
                Message 7 of 19 , Sep 9, 2007
                  Here's how I've determined the "good" luan, but with the possibility of losing the cost of one sheet. When they have a stack of what looks good, meaning the plys look good and the sheets are flat, I bought all the sheets I thought I would need. At home I cut a 3 X 3 inch square out of one corner of one sheet, then did the boil and bake test. Boil the sample for 30 minutes, then bake for 30 minutes. If it doesn't delaminate, it's good to go. If it delaminates, return the rest of the sheets. You're stuck with the one you cut the corner out of. Right now, at Menards, that would only be $9.95. Some people run it through a dishwasher instead of the boil and bake, but I didn't own a dishwasher at that time.
                  That being said, I have only used it for small boats that will be used only in calm conditions, such as my solo canoe, and a dingy. All the time spent to build a substantial cruising boat is not worth the chance of weakness unseen voids can cause. That's my feeling anyway.

                  Bob Slimak


                  ---------------------------------
                  Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel today!

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • ksapelkin
                  Never made it to the oven! About 5 minutes into the boil it just opened up like a flower. Home Depot said it was Moisture Resistant . Thanks a lot for the
                  Message 8 of 19 , Sep 9, 2007
                    Never made it to the oven!

                    About 5 minutes into the boil it just opened up like a flower.

                    Home Depot said it was "Moisture Resistant".

                    Thanks a lot for the tip.

                    Kirill

                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bob Slimak <otter55806@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Here's how I've determined the "good" luan, but with the
                    possibility of losing the cost of one sheet. When they have a stack
                    of what looks good, meaning the plys look good and the sheets are
                    flat, I bought all the sheets I thought I would need. At home I cut a
                    3 X 3 inch square out of one corner of one sheet, then did the boil
                    and bake test. Boil the sample for 30 minutes, then bake for 30
                    minutes. If it doesn't delaminate, it's good to go. If it
                    delaminates, return the rest of the sheets. You're stuck with the one
                    you cut the corner out of. Right now, at Menards, that would only be
                    $9.95. Some people run it through a dishwasher instead of the boil
                    and bake, but I didn't own a dishwasher at that time.
                    > That being said, I have only used it for small boats that will be
                    used only in calm conditions, such as my solo canoe, and a dingy.
                    All the time spent to build a substantial cruising boat is not worth
                    the chance of weakness unseen voids can cause. That's my feeling
                    anyway.
                    >
                    > Bob Slimak
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel
                    today!
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • mkriley48
                    if you do the boil test you need to put a strip under compression and tension to simulate the conditions in a boat. you will find almost none passes and
                    Message 9 of 19 , Sep 10, 2007
                      if you do the boil test you need to put a strip under compression and
                      tension <bent> to simulate the conditions in a boat. you will find
                      almost none passes and even if it does it still does not change the
                      properties of the wood, it is a member of the balsa family and rots
                      while you are looking at it.

                      mike



                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bob Slimak <otter55806@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Here's how I've determined the "good" luan, but with the possibility
                      of losing the cost of one sheet. When they have a stack of what looks
                      good, meaning the plys look good and the sheets are flat, I bought all
                      the sheets I thought I would need. At home I cut a 3 X 3 inch square
                      out of one corner of one sheet, then did the boil and bake test. Boil
                      the sample for 30 minutes, then bake for 30 minutes. If it doesn't
                      delaminate, it's good to go. If it delaminates, return the rest of
                      the sheets. You're stuck with the one you cut the corner out of.
                      Right now, at Menards, that would only be $9.95. Some people run it
                      through a dishwasher instead of the boil and bake, but I didn't own a
                      dishwasher at that time.
                      > That being said, I have only used it for small boats that will be
                      used only in calm conditions, such as my solo canoe, and a dingy. All
                      the time spent to build a substantial cruising boat is not worth the
                      chance of weakness unseen voids can cause. That's my feeling anyway.
                      >
                      > Bob Slimak
                      >
                      >
                      > ---------------------------------
                      > Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel today!
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Michael
                      I would not bother with Luan for anything exterior. Especially a boat. If you want a thin, well glued material available at your local Home Depot. Use their
                      Message 10 of 19 , Sep 10, 2007
                        I would not bother with Luan for anything exterior. Especially a boat.
                        If you want a thin, well glued material available at your local Home
                        Depot. Use their floor laminate material.
                        Using a Weenie Roller and West System or some other 2 part epoxy such as
                        MAS. Simply mix the material, add some Acitone to thin (wet out0 and
                        roll it on both sides and edges (after cutting to your needed size)
                        This will seal the grain fairly deep.
                        Ofcourse, it will need an extra coat after final construction.

                        This floor laminate sells for about $17.00 per sheet right now at our
                        local Home Depot.
                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "mkriley48" <mkriley@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > hi,
                        > I did boat repair for many years in florida and a very large portion
                        > of my income was derived from removing luan from boats. many times the
                        > stuff delaminiated so badly it it resembled the pages of a book. Also
                        > the wood itself is about the most rot prone going. It composts
                        > readily. all the oriental boats have to under go massive
                        > reconstruction due to plywood failure.
                        > a parting note is that home depot ALWAYS buys from the cheapest
                        vender.
                        > mike
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "ksapelkin" iiqtub5086@ wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hello,
                        > >
                        > > Just bought some 5.2 mm luan from Home Depot to construct a Gypsy.
                        > > Now am having second thoughts. It feels pretty flimsy.
                        > >
                        > > I thought to encapsulate in epoxy and glass both sides of the hull,
                        > > frames etc. Maybe 10 oz glass on the inside bottom and 4 oz on the
                        > > sides and frames. Or 4 oz all over the inside.
                        > >
                        > > Is this plywood ok for this application?
                        > >
                        > > Thanks,
                        > >
                        > > Kirill
                        > >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Kenneth Grome
                        ... This is correct, if it is good enough there is no reason why you should avoid it. ... Lauan is the same as Meranti. They are two different terms for the
                        Message 11 of 19 , Sep 11, 2007
                          > I thought that if luan was good enough
                          > then there would be no sense not to use it.

                          This is correct, if it is good enough there is no reason why you should
                          avoid it.


                          > Anyway, I won't use luan. Maybe meranti or
                          > okouma.


                          Lauan is the same as Meranti. They are two different terms for the same
                          wood.

                          Lauan/Meranti is a very good boat building material by the way. It is
                          usually the cheap Poplar core plies -- or the NON-waterproof glue --
                          that makes Lauan plywood from China a low quality boat building
                          material.

                          Some people here seem to be claiming that Meranti is no good for
                          building boats when in fact this is simply not true. Meranti is one of
                          the most desirable wood species available for boat building materials
                          these days. It is much more rot resistant than Okoume and much
                          stronger too.

                          You simply need to know what your plywood is REALLY made of -- all
                          plies, not just the face plies -- and especially the glue. This is why
                          testing is so important, and testing is simple.

                          Sincerely,
                          Ken Grome
                          Bagacay Boatworks
                          www.bagacayboatworks.com
                        • Ron Magen
                          What Ken said . . . However . . . Lauan is easier for me to get locally, and a good bit cheaper - not even counting SHIPPING. {A lot of people get too
                          Message 12 of 19 , Sep 11, 2007
                            What Ken said . . .

                            However . . . 'Lauan' is easier for me to get locally, and a good bit
                            cheaper - not even counting SHIPPING. {A lot of people get too 'target
                            focused' and forget about the cost of shipping - going up all the time -
                            and also the belief that they MUST use the 'high priced spread'}. But
                            I'm NOT stupid, or overly cheap, in my selection.

                            I've read all the 'horror stories' about the 'BigBoxStores' and
                            experienced a few of my own. These guys try to keep a 'price point' and
                            keep changing their suppliers, or quality of product, to maintain it.
                            Just recently I found that the local 'Lowes' no longer carries ANY
                            'Exterior' sheet goods. Even their 'Sheathing' is rated for 'Protected
                            areas Only' !!!

                            The 'point' for 5.2mm Lauan has been about $9.95 for many years. It may
                            even be a 'loss leader'. While it is very handy stuff, and I have made
                            'outdoor projects' from it - that last a long time if prepped properly -
                            it's NOT the stuff I use for boats. I get MY Lauan from a local
                            'hardwood' lumberyard. I SPECIFICALLY ask for 'WATERPROOF' 'EXTERIOR'
                            Lauan. The owner looks like a 'young 100' and *his* yard has been around
                            a LONG time. If I am 'nervous' about a certain piece, I'll test it - and
                            if it fails, back it goes, even the sheet with the 'test piece' cut out
                            !! This stuff does cost a bit more . . . $14.95 vs. the $9.95 - 'BFD'!!

                            Of course I could get 'Certified Meranti' from Harbor Sales in Maryland
                            . . . at a LOT higher price, plus shipping. Because nobody local carries
                            it, I am investigating doing all the paperwork to order some and have it
                            'delivered' through one of the local 'yards. So I DO keep my eyes & mind
                            open to 'new' materials.

                            Regards,
                            Ron Magen
                            Backyard Boatshop

                            > 2e. Re: 5.2 mm luan Gypsy
                            > Posted by: "Kenneth Grome" bagacayboatworks@... kennethgrome
                            > Date: Tue Sep 11, 2007 12:50 am ((PDT))
                            >
                            SNIP
                            >
                            > Lauan is the same as Meranti. They are two different terms for the
                            same
                            > wood.
                            >
                            > Lauan/Meranti is a very good boat building material by the way. It is
                            > usually the cheap Poplar core plies -- or the NON-waterproof glue --
                            > that makes Lauan plywood from China a low quality boat building
                            > material.
                            SNIP
                            > You simply need to know what your plywood is REALLY made of -- all
                            > plies, not just the face plies -- and especially the glue. This is
                            why
                            > testing is so important, and testing is simple.
                          • Clyde Wisner
                            Ron, I don,t know where you are located, but a lot of places sell and ship meranti. I ve used a fair amount of MDO from Harbor Sales, but I don t see meranti
                            Message 13 of 19 , Sep 11, 2007
                              Ron, I don,t know where you are located, but a lot of places sell and
                              ship meranti. I've used a fair amount of MDO from Harbor Sales, but I
                              don't see meranti on thier wbsite and even thier 2nd line okume isn't
                              cheap. They do deliver in the general area free, everyday, but not to
                              private homes. Clyde


                              Ron Magen wrote:

                              > What Ken said . . .
                              >
                              > However . . . 'Lauan' is easier for me to get locally, and a good bit
                              > cheaper - not even counting SHIPPING. {A lot of people get too 'target
                              > focused' and forget about the cost of shipping - going up all the time -
                              > and also the belief that they MUST use the 'high priced spread'}. But
                              > I'm NOT stupid, or overly cheap, in my selection.
                              >
                              > I've read all the 'horror stories' about the 'BigBoxStores' and
                              > experienced a few of my own. These guys try to keep a 'price point' and
                              > keep changing their suppliers, or quality of product, to maintain it.
                              > Just recently I found that the local 'Lowes' no longer carries ANY
                              > 'Exterior' sheet goods. Even their 'Sheathing' is rated for 'Protected
                              > areas Only' !!!
                              >
                              > The 'point' for 5.2mm Lauan has been about $9.95 for many years. It may
                              > even be a 'loss leader'. While it is very handy stuff, and I have made
                              > 'outdoor projects' from it - that last a long time if prepped properly -
                              > it's NOT the stuff I use for boats. I get MY Lauan from a local
                              > 'hardwood' lumberyard. I SPECIFICALLY ask for 'WATERPROOF' 'EXTERIOR'
                              > Lauan. The owner looks like a 'young 100' and *his* yard has been around
                              > a LONG time. If I am 'nervous' about a certain piece, I'll test it - and
                              > if it fails, back it goes, even the sheet with the 'test piece' cut out
                              > !! This stuff does cost a bit more . . . $14.95 vs. the $9.95 - 'BFD'!!
                              >
                              > Of course I could get 'Certified Meranti' from Harbor Sales in Maryland
                              > . . . at a LOT higher price, plus shipping. Because nobody local carries
                              > it, I am investigating doing all the paperwork to order some and have it
                              > 'delivered' through one of the local 'yards. So I DO keep my eyes & mind
                              > open to 'new' materials.
                              >
                              > Regards,
                              > Ron Magen
                              > Backyard Boatshop
                              >
                              > > 2e. R
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >




                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Bob Slimak
                              Mike, The potential rot problem is why I said I would not recommend wasting ones time using it on a substantial boat. My 11 solo canoe is still in great
                              Message 14 of 19 , Sep 11, 2007
                                Mike,
                                The potential rot problem is why I said I would not recommend wasting ones time using it on a substantial boat. My 11' solo canoe is still in great condition after 12 years. I don't know about the dinghy as it went with my Spray 28 when I sold it. If used for small cheap boats that do not stay in the water, and are small enough to be hung from the rafters in the garage, as mine is, they can last a long time. I would rather see someone build a small boat out of luan, rather than no boat at all because they can't afford Okume. And you are wrong about the delamination, as my boats and many others have proved. I did not use luan for building my bantam, because that IS a substantial boat that does spend a great deal of its time in the water, such as my three months in Florida this past winter, where, by the way, I used my 12 year old luan canoe as my boat to shore from the anchorages.

                                Bob Slimak
                                PS to all - Bob Hicks will be running my story about my Florida trip sometime this Fall in M.A.I.B's


                                ---------------------------------
                                Need a vacation? Get great deals to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Bruce Hallman
                                ... Exactly. Only I would add, I would rather see someone build several small cheap boats out of cheap luan before the go on to build that museum quality boat.
                                Message 15 of 19 , Sep 12, 2007
                                  On 9/11/07, Bob Slimak <otter55806@...> wrote:

                                  > I would rather see someone build a small boat out of luan,
                                  > rather than no boat at all because they can't afford Okume.

                                  Exactly.

                                  Only I would add, I would rather see someone build several small cheap
                                  boats out of cheap luan before the go on to build that museum quality
                                  boat.

                                  Luan is great wood to use to learn how to build boats. Personally, I
                                  think the first three boats you build should be quick cheap 'learning
                                  projects'. Save the expensive wood for boat #4.
                                • Bruce Hallman
                                  ... Actually, I think the first dozen boats you build should be small cardboard scale models. Then build a few disposable boats, as quickly as possible, using
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Sep 12, 2007
                                    > Luan is great wood to use to learn how to build boats. Personally, I
                                    > think the first three boats you build should be quick cheap 'learning
                                    > projects'. Save the expensive wood for boat #4.

                                    Actually, I think the first dozen boats you build should be small
                                    cardboard scale models. Then build a few disposable boats, as quickly
                                    as possible, using luan. They build the 'keeper' boat with prime
                                    materials.
                                  • Robert du Domaine
                                    There s possible wisdom in the middle way. That is fir ACX. I built a cheap and quick boat of that material in 1978 and at last word it was still going
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Sep 13, 2007
                                      There's possible wisdom in the middle way. That is fir ACX. I built a
                                      cheap and quick boat of that material in 1978 and at last word it was
                                      still going strong. Another I sealed the fir with S3 penetrating epoxy
                                      and it didn't check. I believe the fir is just a few dollars more than
                                      the questionable luan.
                                    • Kenneth Grome
                                      ... There is nothing questionable about Lauan as a boat building material, it performs very well in this role. Question the manufacturer or the reseller if
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Sep 13, 2007
                                        > I believe the fir is just a few dollars
                                        > more than the questionable luan.


                                        There is nothing questionable about Lauan as a boat building material,
                                        it performs very well in this role. Question the manufacturer or the
                                        reseller if you must, especially with regard to the GLUE used to hold
                                        the plies together, but understand that the Lauan itself is almost
                                        never the problem ...

                                        The use of non-WBP (Water and Boil Proof) glue is the main reason people
                                        whine about the failure of their Lauan plywood. If they would only
                                        test it instead of assuming the glue is WBP, they would not create
                                        these problems for themselves.

                                        By the way, I have read recent reports of exterior fir plywood
                                        delaminating because of the use of MR (Moisture Resistant) rather than
                                        WPB glues. It seems you should do your own testing on any plywood you
                                        buy these days ...

                                        Sincerely,
                                        Ken Grome
                                        Bagacay Boatworks
                                        www.bagacayboatworks.com
                                      • Bob Slimak
                                        Bruce, Exactly! That was my point about using it only to build small, cheap boats to be used in well protected waters. Once they find out they can build a
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Sep 13, 2007
                                          Bruce,

                                          Exactly! That was my point about using it only to build small, cheap
                                          boats to be used in well protected waters. Once they find out they can
                                          build a boat, and get hooked, they can worry about finding the money to
                                          build that cruiser.

                                          Bob Slimak

                                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > On 9/11/07, Bob Slimak <otter55806@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > > I would rather see someone build a small boat out of luan,
                                          > > rather than no boat at all because they can't afford Okume.
                                          >
                                          > Exactly.
                                          >
                                          > Only I would add, I would rather see someone build several small cheap
                                          > boats out of cheap luan before the go on to build that museum quality
                                          > boat.
                                          >
                                          > Luan is great wood to use to learn how to build boats. Personally, I
                                          > think the first three boats you build should be quick cheap 'learning
                                          > projects'. Save the expensive wood for boat #4.
                                          >
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