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Re: [bolger] Re: Thomaston Galley

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  • Bruce Hallman
    Here are three quickie isometric renderings of the Thomaston Galley. http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/1322596188/
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
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      Here are three quickie isometric renderings of the Thomaston Galley.

      http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/1322596188/
    • adventures_in_astrophotography
      Hi Bruce, ... Nice renderings as usual. Bolger told me on the phone once that the sprit rig on his TG went well to windward, but was annoying, if not dangerous
      Message 2 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
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        Hi Bruce,

        > Here are three quickie isometric renderings of the Thomaston Galley.
        >
        > http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/1322596188/

        Nice renderings as usual.

        Bolger told me on the phone once that the sprit rig on his TG went
        well to windward, but was annoying, if not dangerous to sail downwind
        due to heavy rolling. He said that if I wanted to use such a sail in
        Gypsy (the origin of the discussion was to put a rig in Gypsy that
        would stow inside the boat - an idea PCB was in favor of), he could
        only recommend it if used with a boom.

        I think that if I were to build a Thomaston Galley (and I've wanted to
        for a long time), I might try the original rig from Gypsy, or maybe a
        balanced lug. Dealing with two snotters in a tippy small boat sounds
        difficult to me. The mast position in TG would probably limit the
        options for other rigs, however.

        Better yet, leave off the rig altogether and row it. If that v-shaped
        hull goes anything like my Michalak Robote, it should be a joy to row
        and easy to make good time even in choppy water.

        Jon Kolb
        www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
      • John and Kathy Trussell
        I never weighed it--maybe 140-150 lbs. Mine was built upside down over molds with a keel and cedar sides--bottom was clued and nailed to the keel,
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
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          I never weighed it--maybe 140-150 lbs. Mine was built upside down over molds with a keel and cedar sides--bottom was clued and nailed to the keel, frames/transom and to the edge of the cedar sides--definitely not stitch and glue, but, with no chines, not very conventional.

          I think one of Payson's books had expanded bottom plamks, and it might be possible to use this to build a stitch and glue Galley. However, I think you would still need to add and carve the ram or snout. I don't know if the stitch and glue version would self jig or not. Potential builders should note that the floor board consumes a sheet of plywood and requires the support of several floors. If I were to build another, I think building over a mold with plywood planking supported by a keel and chines would be the way to go.

          JohnT
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: pgochnour@...
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, September 03, 2007 6:42 PM
          Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Thomaston Galley


          Question for John T ....how much did that Thomaston Galley weigh? Was it
          conventional construction or stitch and glue?

          Tyson in Galveston

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        • John Freeman
          The TG was of conventional construction, but looks to me like it could be done stitch and glue if you have the expertise to draft the panels. No provision for
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
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            The TG was of conventional construction, but looks to me like it could be
            done stitch and glue if you have the expertise to draft the panels. No
            provision for flotation, but it could easily be accomplished--although is is
            a wooden boat! Isn't that enough flotation? He gives the option of solid
            wood or plywood for the hull.

            Bolger says it weighs 140 pounds, stripped. His is the solid wood version.
            Plywood might be a little lighter.

            At the time he wrote the book (Small Boats) he had one, and Payson had one,
            plus a handful of others. He said that he and Payson loved them.

            --
            John Freeman
            Check us out at--
            http://2oldkiters.smugmug.com/


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          • Bruce Hallman
            The Thomaston Galley gets relatively little popular attention. To my eye, I am guessing it is not the best to windward. but looks like a great all around
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 22, 2008
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              The Thomaston Galley gets relatively little popular attention. To my
              eye, I am guessing it is not the best to windward. but looks like a
              great all around boat.

              http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/2433524227/
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