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Re: Thomaston Galley

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  • graeme19121984
    Hi Tyson, There s a picture of one sailing at page 82 of Dynamite Payson s first book, Instant Boats , and a bit of background info about there. At page 36
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 2, 2007
      Hi Tyson,

      There's a picture of one sailing at page 82 of Dynamite Payson's first
      book, "Instant Boats", and a bit of background info about there. At
      page 36 there's a photo of 3 models made by Dynamite of Surf, Teal, and
      TG lined up together. Lines and offsets are at Page 32.

      TG plans are sold by Dynamite as "non-instant" boat plans as it's built
      on a strongback etc.

      Graeme


      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, pgochnour@... wrote:
      > ...saw a photo of it once and something about it caught
    • pgochnour@aol.com
      Thanks for the information, gents...looked at the Boatbuilder web site but their index of back issues only goes through 2005...there s an old post on the
      Message 2 of 18 , Sep 3, 2007
        Thanks for the information, gents...looked at the Boatbuilder web site
        but their index of back issues only goes through 2005...there's an old post on
        the Bolger site from 1999, from someone named Monica who built a Thomsaton
        Galley but no details ..there isn't much information on Mr. Payson's site about
        the galley, other than that he sells plans for it for 35 bucks....I did find
        the photo I had seen...it's of a model of the thing on page 36 of my old copy of
        "Instant Boats," by Mr. Payson,and also, as one of you pointed out, the lines
        and offsets are in the same book.... have to conclude that the design was not
        very popular for one reason or another since evidently not many people have
        built it...too bad, cause it's a very interesting looking vessel...has a
        classical, old-world appearance to it...

        Tyson in Galveston


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      • John Freeman
        The Thomaston Galley was friend Bolger s attempt to design a small boat that would do everything well--sail, row, and motor. The unusual appearance was the
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 3, 2007
          The Thomaston Galley was friend Bolger's attempt to design a small boat that
          would do everything well--sail, row, and motor. The unusual appearance was
          the result of this process, and to everyone's surprise (including, I suspect
          Phil himself!) it seemed to work well at all three.

          Once upon a time, many years ago, I thought long and hard about building
          one, both because Bolger said it works well, and because I really liked the
          unusual looks of it. It didn't happen, like so many great ideas in life. I
          wish I had done it.

          --
          John Freeman
          Check us out at--
          http://2oldkiters.smugmug.com/


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • pgochnour@aol.com
          Question for John T ....how much did that Thomaston Galley weigh? Was it conventional construction or stitch and glue? Tyson in Galveston
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 3, 2007
            Question for John T ....how much did that Thomaston Galley weigh? Was it
            conventional construction or stitch and glue?

            Tyson in Galveston


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          • pgochnour@aol.com
            One more question about the T.G. ...any provision for floatation? water-tight compartments or ? Tyson in Galveston ************************************** Get a
            Message 5 of 18 , Sep 3, 2007
              One more question about the T.G. ...any provision for floatation?
              water-tight compartments or ?

              Tyson in Galveston


              **************************************
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              peek of the all-new AOL at http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


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            • Lincoln Ross
              If I recall correctly, my introduction to Phil Bolger s work was a glowing review of the Thomaston Galley in National Fisherman. My Dad s boss used to get this
              Message 6 of 18 , Sep 3, 2007
                If I recall correctly, my introduction to Phil Bolger's work was a
                glowing review of the Thomaston Galley in National Fisherman. My Dad's
                boss used to get this publication and would send it along specifically
                for me to read. Back then, they'd have lots of articles on interesting
                small boats. I specifically remember articles on Hereshoff's Rozinante
                and also one by someone who had made a crude little fiberglass sailing
                peapod.

                Payson's book, Go Build Your Own Boat, has 13 pages of discussion
                specifically about the Thomaston Galley, with offsets and plans. Might
                be enough info to build, although of course if you get the real plans
                they might have some extra information. (When I bought the Brick plans
                they had some extra options that I hadn't expected, like an alternate
                gaff rig.)

                I've seen a Thomaston Galley at the Snow Row in Hull. (And, yes, it was
                a pretty cold day in Hull.)

                Perhaps we don't see them because it's likely to be more work to build
                than an instant boat. Might work better and be worth it if you were
                going to use it a lot.

                Too angular to look old world to me. More like in your face. But that
                can be a good thing around yacht snobs, etc. Just don't enter very many
                handicap races with a Bolger boat against yacht snobs. As reported by a
                friend, they'll change the handicap on you until you can't win.

                >
                > Re: Thomaston Galley
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/55375;_ylc=X3oDMTJydmFqdXQ1BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzExOTQzNjkEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1NzkxBG1zZ0lkAzU1Mzc1BHNlYwNkbXNnBHNsawN2bXNnBHN0aW1lAzExODg4MjUwNzc->
                >
                >
                >
                > Posted by: "pgochnour@..." pgochnour@...
                > <mailto:pgochnour@...?Subject=%20Re%3A%20Thomaston%20Galley>
                > cabezadevacaelpato <http://profiles.yahoo.com/cabezadevacaelpato>
                >
                >
                > Mon Sep 3, 2007 3:26 am (PST)
                >
                > Thanks for the information, gents...looked at the Boatbuilder web site
                > but their index of back issues only goes through 2005...there'
                > s an old post on
                > the Bolger site from 1999, from someone named Monica who built a
                > Thomsaton
                > Galley but no details ..there isn't much information on Mr. Payson's
                > site about
                > the galley, other than that he sells plans for it for 35 bucks....I
                > did find
                > the photo I had seen...it's of a model of the thing on page 36 of my
                > old copy of
                > "Instant Boats," by Mr. Payson,and also, as one of you pointed out,
                > the lines
                > and offsets are in the same book.... have to conclude that the design
                > was not
                > very popular for one reason or another since evidently not many people
                > have
                > built it...too bad, cause it's a very interesting looking vessel...has a
                > classical, old-world appearance to it...
                >
                > Tyson in Galveston
              • Howard Stephenson
                There are decks fore and aft. The photo in Small Boats seems to show large cutouts in the aft-most bulkhead but you d be able to close it off completely and
                Message 7 of 18 , Sep 3, 2007
                  There are decks fore and aft. The photo in Small Boats seems to show
                  large cutouts in the aft-most bulkhead but you'd be able to close it
                  off completely and fill the space with plastic bottles or whatever for
                  floatation, or just leave it empty. You could do the same at the bow
                  too. There's a shallow watertight well for the outboard motor.

                  It's meant for plywood construction the old-fashioned way, with
                  transom, stem and bulkheads set up on a strongback, stringers and a
                  ply skin glued and nailed to the frame. (Another look at the plans
                  through the magnifying glass reveals that it was meant to be built
                  with solid timber planks for the sides. There's a drawing showing
                  optional plywood sides.)

                  It looks suitable for being built stitch-and-glue, if you know how to
                  derive the panel shapes from the offsets, or know someone who does.
                  Bruce Hallman would advocate building a little carboard model before
                  you start full-size. I don't know what it weighs; about the same as
                  any other 15'6" x 4'1" dinghy made of the same material, I guess.

                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, pgochnour@... wrote:
                  >
                  > One more question about the T.G. ...any provision for
                  floatation?
                  > water-tight compartments or ?
                • Bruce Hallman
                  Here are three quickie isometric renderings of the Thomaston Galley. http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/1322596188/
                  Message 8 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
                    Here are three quickie isometric renderings of the Thomaston Galley.

                    http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/1322596188/
                  • adventures_in_astrophotography
                    Hi Bruce, ... Nice renderings as usual. Bolger told me on the phone once that the sprit rig on his TG went well to windward, but was annoying, if not dangerous
                    Message 9 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
                      Hi Bruce,

                      > Here are three quickie isometric renderings of the Thomaston Galley.
                      >
                      > http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/1322596188/

                      Nice renderings as usual.

                      Bolger told me on the phone once that the sprit rig on his TG went
                      well to windward, but was annoying, if not dangerous to sail downwind
                      due to heavy rolling. He said that if I wanted to use such a sail in
                      Gypsy (the origin of the discussion was to put a rig in Gypsy that
                      would stow inside the boat - an idea PCB was in favor of), he could
                      only recommend it if used with a boom.

                      I think that if I were to build a Thomaston Galley (and I've wanted to
                      for a long time), I might try the original rig from Gypsy, or maybe a
                      balanced lug. Dealing with two snotters in a tippy small boat sounds
                      difficult to me. The mast position in TG would probably limit the
                      options for other rigs, however.

                      Better yet, leave off the rig altogether and row it. If that v-shaped
                      hull goes anything like my Michalak Robote, it should be a joy to row
                      and easy to make good time even in choppy water.

                      Jon Kolb
                      www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                    • John and Kathy Trussell
                      I never weighed it--maybe 140-150 lbs. Mine was built upside down over molds with a keel and cedar sides--bottom was clued and nailed to the keel,
                      Message 10 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
                        I never weighed it--maybe 140-150 lbs. Mine was built upside down over molds with a keel and cedar sides--bottom was clued and nailed to the keel, frames/transom and to the edge of the cedar sides--definitely not stitch and glue, but, with no chines, not very conventional.

                        I think one of Payson's books had expanded bottom plamks, and it might be possible to use this to build a stitch and glue Galley. However, I think you would still need to add and carve the ram or snout. I don't know if the stitch and glue version would self jig or not. Potential builders should note that the floor board consumes a sheet of plywood and requires the support of several floors. If I were to build another, I think building over a mold with plywood planking supported by a keel and chines would be the way to go.

                        JohnT
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: pgochnour@...
                        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, September 03, 2007 6:42 PM
                        Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Thomaston Galley


                        Question for John T ....how much did that Thomaston Galley weigh? Was it
                        conventional construction or stitch and glue?

                        Tyson in Galveston

                        **************************************
                        Get a sneak
                        peek of the all-new AOL at http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour

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                      • John Freeman
                        The TG was of conventional construction, but looks to me like it could be done stitch and glue if you have the expertise to draft the panels. No provision for
                        Message 11 of 18 , Sep 4, 2007
                          The TG was of conventional construction, but looks to me like it could be
                          done stitch and glue if you have the expertise to draft the panels. No
                          provision for flotation, but it could easily be accomplished--although is is
                          a wooden boat! Isn't that enough flotation? He gives the option of solid
                          wood or plywood for the hull.

                          Bolger says it weighs 140 pounds, stripped. His is the solid wood version.
                          Plywood might be a little lighter.

                          At the time he wrote the book (Small Boats) he had one, and Payson had one,
                          plus a handful of others. He said that he and Payson loved them.

                          --
                          John Freeman
                          Check us out at--
                          http://2oldkiters.smugmug.com/


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Bruce Hallman
                          The Thomaston Galley gets relatively little popular attention. To my eye, I am guessing it is not the best to windward. but looks like a great all around
                          Message 12 of 18 , Apr 22, 2008
                            The Thomaston Galley gets relatively little popular attention. To my
                            eye, I am guessing it is not the best to windward. but looks like a
                            great all around boat.

                            http://flickr.com/photos/hallman/2433524227/
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