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Re: Isometric rendering of AS19

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  • graeme19121984
    Bruce, Very nice :-) The perspective view from below shows a shape, to my eye, that would be at home amongst the large marine mammals in the bays, and offshore
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1, 2007
      Bruce,

      Very nice :-)

      The perspective view from below shows a shape, to my eye, that would
      be at home amongst the large marine mammals in the bays, and
      offshore around here :-) If the marine critters take any notice at
      all of such things then it also should not scare up the herds of
      stingrays in the shallows as I don't think any marine mammals here
      prey on them.

      Boat nuts all over are really going to benefit from what you have
      done over at Wikipedia. Thanks.

      Graeme

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
      >
      > http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/24/AS-19_iso.png
      >
      > Here is a 3D isometric rendering of an AS-19
      >
    • graeme19121984
      Just a thought: PCB cites here and there some drawbacks to those articulating types of leeboards. I ve wondered about irritation due to them working, broken
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 1, 2007
        Just a thought: PCB cites here and there some drawbacks to those
        articulating types of leeboards. I've wondered about irritation due
        to them working, broken winging, and banging. It occurs to me that
        when traversing deep water if these guards had a slot then these
        simple boards could be dropped in those to form a lee daggerboard.
        No more movement or noise, and they might be set lower to make up
        the lost performance that comes with being up against the hull. I
        guess it depends on how much they may actually annoy - I know some
        people don't like it.

        Graeme


        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
        >
        > http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/24/AS-19_iso.png
        >
        > Here is a 3D isometric rendering of an AS-19
        >
      • cabbie_caesar
        Graeme, In my experience there are no negatives with the leeboards as designed. Tacking the boards is a lot easier than tacking a jib. Banging does not
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 9, 2007
          Graeme,

          In my experience there are no negatives with the leeboards as
          designed. "Tacking" the boards is a lot easier than tacking a jib.
          Banging does not occur. While sailing broken wing the board merely
          skims on the surface.

          I have found that the boards make good fenders while at the pier.
          Paint them a complementary color as it masks the square boat shape.
          As the boards are not restrained by a slot I don't have to worry
          about springing something when bumping along the bottom. Use the
          rope hinge as PCB intended; the hinge twists tightening it's self
          when lowering the board. There are no downsides!

          cabbie


          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "graeme19121984" <graeme19121984@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Just a thought: PCB cites here and there some drawbacks to those
          > articulating types of leeboards. >
          > Graeme
          >
          >
          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@> wrote:
          > >
          > > http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/24/AS-19_iso.png
          > >
          > > Here is a 3D isometric rendering of an AS-19
          > >
          >
        • graeme19121984
          It s good to hear more in praise of this design, thanks cabbie. I recall PCB mentioning their usefulness as fenders ;-) Are the leeboards very heavy to haul up
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 10, 2007
            It's good to hear more in praise of this design, thanks cabbie. I
            recall PCB mentioning their usefulness as fenders ;-) Are the
            leeboards very heavy to haul up onto the guards and lower by the
            pendants? How much do you think that lift is? Is it easy enough for
            one arm only when under way sailing?

            Has your rudder taken much of a beating when drying out? I wonder
            how much weight it has to bear, and whether the endplate gets dinged?

            Cheers
            Graeme



            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "cabbie_caesar" <cabbie_caesar@...>
            wrote:
            > In my experience there are no negatives with the leeboards as
            > designed. "Tacking" the boards is a lot easier than tacking a
            jib....
          • cabbie_caesar
            Yes, the boards are somewhat heavy, but you don t haul the boards onto the guards when tacking; I just haul them clear of the water. My system could be
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 11, 2007
              Yes, the boards are somewhat heavy, but you don't haul the boards
              onto the guards when tacking; I just haul them clear of the water.
              My system could be improved by installing jam cleats to be used while
              sailing, reserving the thole pins for when you need to secure the
              boards while trailering.

              As for my rudder; that is one component that was built stout. I
              think the rudder post may be a section from a propeller shaft.
              Additionally, the rudder is heavily glassed - if the boat fell off
              the trailer at 50 I doubt the rudder would be damaged at all.

              cabbie


              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "graeme19121984" <graeme19121984@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > It's good to hear more in praise of this design>
              > Cheers
              > Graeme
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "cabbie_caesar" <cabbie_caesar@>
              > wrote:
              > > In my experience there are no negatives with the leeboards as
              > > designed. "Tacking" the boards is a lot easier than tacking a
              > jib....
              >
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