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Got plans...Can't read'em

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  • Bill Godwin
    Got the sneakeasy plans today. A little less than I was hoping. I understand that the scale is 3/4 -1 . Now I could pull the dimensions off of the blueprint
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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      Got the sneakeasy plans today. A little less than I was hoping. I
      understand that the scale is 3/4"-1'. Now I could pull the
      dimensions off of the blueprint with an accurate set of caliphers,
      yet I feel these numbers are the key. For example; I've figured out
      the numbers (kinda) along the bottom of the boat. 2.0.0 is 2'? for
      the last bow section it shows...2.8.1? this length is ???

      Showing the side alond the bottom for the slightly rockered bottom
      shows from a perfectly flat(?) 2.5.5 to 2.4.7 to 2.4.3 to 2.3.5 to
      the bow at 2.2.2? Now this HAS to be the rocker coming off the flat
      bottom plain.

      I guess?

      Any help ?

      Please?

      Thanks
      Bill
    • Harry James
      They are feet- inches and 1/8th s . If there is a plus or minus then it is a 1/16th in that direction on the end. The measurements should be from a baseline on
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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        They are feet- inches and 1/8th's . If there is a plus or minus then it
        is a 1/16th in that direction on the end. The measurements should be
        from a baseline on the panel, probably from the sheer on the sides, but
        I don't know without looking at the plans. I would suggest you get your
        hands on Payson's Instant boats. You make your station lines, usually
        every foot on the panel, (I use a sheet rock square) make the
        measurement on each station line, drive a nail into the mark, bend a
        flexible batten around the nails and draw your cutting line.

        HJ

        Bill Godwin wrote:
        > Got the sneakeasy plans today. A little less than I was hoping. I
        > understand that the scale is 3/4"-1'. Now I could pull the
        > dimensions off of the blueprint with an accurate set of caliphers,
        > yet I feel these numbers are the key. For example; I've figured out
        > the numbers (kinda) along the bottom of the boat. 2.0.0 is 2'? for
        > the last bow section it shows...2.8.1? this length is ???
        >
        > Showing the side alond the bottom for the slightly rockered bottom
        > shows from a perfectly flat(?) 2.5.5 to 2.4.7 to 2.4.3 to 2.3.5 to
        > the bow at 2.2.2? Now this HAS to be the rocker coming off the flat
        > bottom plain.
        >
        > I guess?
        >
        > Any help ?
        >
        > Please?
        >
        > Thanks
        > Bill
        >
        >
        >
        > Bolger rules!!!
        > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
        > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
        > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
        > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
        > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Bill Godwin
        Well there ya go. feet , inches and 8th s. Now its starting to come together. Thanks ever so much! Bill ... it ... but ... your ... usually
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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          Well there ya go. feet , inches and 8th's. Now its starting to come
          together. Thanks ever so much!

          Bill

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
          >
          > They are feet- inches and 1/8th's . If there is a plus or minus then
          it
          > is a 1/16th in that direction on the end. The measurements should be
          > from a baseline on the panel, probably from the sheer on the sides,
          but
          > I don't know without looking at the plans. I would suggest you get
          your
          > hands on Payson's Instant boats. You make your station lines,
          usually
          > every foot on the panel, (I use a sheet rock square) make the
          > measurement on each station line, drive a nail into the mark, bend a
          > flexible batten around the nails and draw your cutting line.
          >
          > HJ
        • Bill Godwin
          Oh , I ll pick up the books as well. Thanks!! ... then it ... be ... sides, but ... your ... usually ... a
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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            Oh , I'll pick up the books as well.

            Thanks!!

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
            >
            > They are feet- inches and 1/8th's . If there is a plus or minus
            then it
            > is a 1/16th in that direction on the end. The measurements should
            be
            > from a baseline on the panel, probably from the sheer on the
            sides, but
            > I don't know without looking at the plans. I would suggest you get
            your
            > hands on Payson's Instant boats. You make your station lines,
            usually
            > every foot on the panel, (I use a sheet rock square) make the
            > measurement on each station line, drive a nail into the mark, bend
            a
            > flexible batten around the nails and draw your cutting line.
            >
            > HJ

            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Jon & Wanda(Tink)
            In home building doing siding I teach the employes to do inches 1/8ths and use + or -. The ones that use + all the time have a good attitude the ones that use
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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              In home building doing siding I teach the employes to do inches
              1/8ths and use + or -. The ones that use + all the time have a good
              attitude the ones that use - have a bad. So you teach all to use +
              only and it actualy inproves there attitude. Just food for thought on
              life and the designer of what you are working on.

              Jon


              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@> wrote:
              > >
              > > They are feet- inches and 1/8th's . If there is a plus or minus
              > then it
              > > is a 1/16th in that direction on the end. The measurements should
              > be
              > > from a baseline on the panel, probably from the sheer on the
              > sides, but
              > > I don't know without looking at the plans. I would suggest you
              get
              > your
              > > hands on Payson's Instant boats. You make your station lines,
              > usually
              > > every foot on the panel, (I use a sheet rock square) make the
              > > measurement on each station line, drive a nail into the mark,
              bend
              > a
              > > flexible batten around the nails and draw your cutting line.
              > >
              > > HJ
              >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • catboat15@aol.com
              While you are out shopping get a couple of those triangular shaped scales to measure things on the drawings. There are two kinds of scales one known as
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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                While you are out shopping get a couple of those triangular shaped scales to
                measure things on the drawings. There are two kinds of scales one known as
                architects scales and the other as engineer scales.

                Most boat plans are drawn to some fractional scale such as 3/8 inch on the
                plan is equal to one foot on the boat so you would use the architects scale for
                that. The engineer's scale is in decimal divisions such as 20 divisions on
                the scale to one inch. If your plans are from Bolger or Payson there is
                usually a "table of offsets" on the plan and to get a start on the boat build a
                cardboard model using the plans and glue it together. that is always a big help
                in visualizing what a three dimensional boat looks like when you bend and
                fasten all the pieces together. Cardboard and scotch tape is a lot cheaper than
                marine ply and epoxy.

                What I did with my first Bolger Car Topper was to punch in the offsets from
                the table into a CAD program (So long ago it was a DOS program) and printed
                out the shapes using the offset points and made a 1/6 size boat out of hobby
                shop sheet balsa. that I sailed around in our pool.

                Bolger, Payson Car topper
                14-9 foot Swifty
                John Meacham




                ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Bill Godwin
                Great!! can t wait to understand this to the fullest. My plan has 3/4 =1 . ... on the ... architects scale for
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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                  Great!! can't wait to understand this to the fullest. My plan has
                  3/4"=1'.


                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, catboat15@... wrote:

                  > Most boat plans are drawn to some fractional scale such as 3/8 inch
                  on the
                  > plan is equal to one foot on the boat so you would use the
                  architects scale for
                  > that.
                • derbyrm
                  That s also a very convenient scale in that 1/16 on the plan equals 1 on the boat. Most scales are marked with 16ths. Roger
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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                    That's also a very convenient scale in that 1/16" on the plan equals 1" on the boat. Most scales are marked with 16ths.

                    Roger
                    derbyrm@...
                    http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Bill Godwin
                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sunday, June 17, 2007 5:11 PM
                    Subject: [bolger] Re: Got plans...Can't read'em


                    Great!! can't wait to understand this to the fullest. My plan has
                    3/4"=1'.

                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, catboat15@... wrote:

                    > Most boat plans are drawn to some fractional scale such as 3/8 inch
                    on the
                    > plan is equal to one foot on the boat so you would use the
                    architects scale for
                    > that.





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Harry James
                    Weston Farmer in his book From my Old Boatshop has a good chapter on model building in 3/4 in scale and all the benefits that accrue in that scale, it isn t
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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                      Weston Farmer in his book "From my Old Boatshop" has a good chapter on
                      model building in 3/4 in scale and all the benefits that accrue in that
                      scale, it isn't just the 1/16th to a foot. I was going to recommend
                      going to Bookfinder.com for a copy but I see that the two copies listed
                      are over $!00. Use plan B-- interlibrary loan.

                      HJ

                      derbyrm wrote:
                      > That's also a very convenient scale in that 1/16" on the plan equals 1" on the boat. Most scales are marked with 16ths.
                      >
                      > Roger
                      > derbyrm@...
                      > http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: Bill Godwin
                      > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Sunday, June 17, 2007 5:11 PM
                      > Subject: [bolger] Re: Got plans...Can't read'em
                      >
                      >
                      > Great!! can't wait to understand this to the fullest. My plan has
                      > 3/4"=1'.
                      >
                      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, catboat15@... wrote:
                      >
                      > > Most boat plans are drawn to some fractional scale such as 3/8 inch
                      > on the
                      > > plan is equal to one foot on the boat so you would use the
                      > architects scale for
                      > > that.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Bolger rules!!!
                      > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
                      > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                      > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                      > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                      > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                      > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Rick Bedard
                      As a kid in New England I was taught the feet-inches-eighths method of measuring and cutting lumber. If a plus sign followed the measurement it meant leave the
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 17, 2007
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                        As a kid in New England I was taught the feet-inches-eighths method of measuring and cutting lumber. If a plus sign followed the measurement it meant leave the pencil line showing on the finished piece when cutting the plank, a minus sign meant cut the pencil line off. No sign meant split the pencil line with the saw cut..

                        Rick


                        "Jon & Wanda(Tink)" <windyjon@...> wrote:
                        In home building doing siding I teach the employes to do inches
                        1/8ths and use + or -. The ones that use + all the time have a good
                        attitude the ones that use - have a bad. So you teach all to use +
                        only and it actualy inproves there attitude. Just food for thought on
                        life and the designer of what you are working on.

                        Jon

                        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > They are feet- inches and 1/8th's . If there is a plus or minus
                        > then it
                        > > is a 1/16th in that direction on the end. The measurements should
                        > be
                        > > from a baseline on the panel, probably from the sheer on the
                        > sides, but
                        > > I don't know without looking at the plans. I would suggest you
                        get
                        > your
                        > > hands on Payson's Instant boats. You make your station lines,
                        > usually
                        > > every foot on the panel, (I use a sheet rock square) make the
                        > > measurement on each station line, drive a nail into the mark,
                        bend
                        > a
                        > > flexible batten around the nails and draw your cutting line.
                        > >
                        > > HJ
                        >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >






                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Clyde Wisner
                        Given a set of offsets, you could draw the boat. Numbers you are not sure of on the plans should correspond to numbers or measurments in the offsets. There is
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 18, 2007
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                          Given a set of offsets, you could draw the boat. Numbers you are not
                          sure of on the plans should correspond to numbers or measurments in the
                          offsets. There is an interesting article in the latest(May/June)
                          WoodenBoat, about lofting 1/4 size and picking up the shapes you need.
                          Clyde PS,most of PCB's boats are hard chined and these are easier to
                          learn to loft.

                          Bill Godwin wrote:

                          > Great!! can't wait to understand this to the fullest. My plan has
                          > 3/4"=1'.
                          >
                          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
                          > catboat15@... wrote:
                          >
                          > > Most boat plans are drawn to some fractional scale such as 3/8 inch
                          > on the
                          > > plan is equal to one foot on the boat so you would use the
                          > architects scale for
                          > > that.
                          >
                          >




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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