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Re: re Folding Schooner

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  • Nels
    ... Hi Kev, I couldn t get the second link to open that showed the second method. However I can t imagine me lifting and lowering the forward section without
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 15, 2007
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "lordborrolan" <lordborrolan@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Guy's, Just a thought, but how much weight is actually involved
      > with folding, some say loads, others say different, phk 58 (mostly
      > harmless photos of the folding schooner, on webshots) has a photo of
      > two people with a schooner on it's side and (I pressume) begining to
      > be folded, another site (www.hmshft.org) has a series of photos
      > showing a system of opening a schooner on its trailer, with a wacking
      > great pole, and rope around the main mast to lower it into position.
      > Mr. Bolger says that he opened and closed a schooner on his own, so
      > how much additional weight would be too much ???.

      Hi Kev,

      I couldn't get the second link to open that showed the second method.
      However I can't imagine me lifting and lowering the forward section
      without *some* sort of mechanical assistance. Besides being old, I am
      also lazy:-)

      At Paysons plans location he states the FS as designed requires 14
      sheets of plywood. Two 15.5' skiffs joined in the middle.

      http://www.instantboats.com/fschooner.htm

      You might get some idea of weights from looking at Jim Michalak's
      plans. Here is one example - a 15.5 X 5 ft. power skiff at 350 pounds.

      http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/af4/breve/index.htm

      The same sailing version only a bit longer is only 250 pounds.

      http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/af3/index.htm

      And another BW style Jon boat at 300 pounds, which might give an
      indication of the stern section.

      http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/campjon/index.htm

      If you joined the two cabins that would add some more weight - plus
      and additional layer of ply on the bottom - might perhaps suggest an
      "educated guess" of 450 pounds per section.

      Still - a 31 foot schooner coming in under 1000 pounds might be
      considered extremely light weight in most eyes?

      I will try to post a diagram of the winching arrangement that might
      work, guided with some assistance by a crew member.

      Could it also work with a single leeboard that Michalak uses on many
      of his sailboats up to 32 feet in length? Or the weighted daggerboard
      like the Single Handed Schooner?

      Or perhaps a swing keel like the I60? There is a guy in the UK who has
      designed a simple version therof. I will try to find the link.

      Nels
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