Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Modify a Windsprint?

Expand Messages
  • Christopher Wetherill
    I am warming up to build a Windsprint this spring. I am considering giving it about 2 extra inches of freeboard. Some of the pictures I have seen look like
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      I am warming up to build a Windsprint this spring. I am considering
      giving it about 2 extra inches of freeboard. Some of the pictures I
      have seen look like the gunwale is perilously close to the water close
      hauled. I would appreciate opinions of this idea and the possibility
      of decking over the bow and stern.

      V/R
      Chris
    • GarthAB
      Hi Chris -- I built a Windsprint years ago as my very first boat. It goes together quickly, and you get a lot of boat for not that much work. I m not sure
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Chris --

        I built a Windsprint years ago as my very first boat. It goes together
        quickly, and you get a lot of boat for not that much work.

        I'm not sure about the freeboard part of your question -- but I would
        definitely recommend decking over the bow and stern areas and creating
        watertight storage compartments there, accessible by wooden hatches
        held down by bungee cords and sealed with weatherstripping -- or
        somehow adding significant amounts of flotation foam to the boat. When
        it goes over and fills with water, it takes a long time to bail it
        out. Thinking about making it self-rescue capable is a good exercise.
        It'll add complexity to a beautifully simple boat, but you'll be able
        to go more places with peace of mind.

        All best,
        Garth




        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Wetherill"
        <wetherillc@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am warming up to build a Windsprint this spring. I am considering
        > giving it about 2 extra inches of freeboard. Some of the pictures I
        > have seen look like the gunwale is perilously close to the water close
        > hauled. I would appreciate opinions of this idea and the possibility
        > of decking over the bow and stern.
        >
        > V/R
        > Chris
        >
      • 9buck crowley
        Chris Google search SWBANS. Go their site and look in the photos of events section they show a number of Windsprints with decks. Whether or not any have
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Chris

          Google search SWBANS. Go their site and look in the "photos of events"
          section they show a number of Windsprints with decks. Whether or not any
          have additional freeboard I don't know but they certainly have a lot of
          experience with this boat.

          Buck Crowley

          >From: "Christopher Wetherill" <wetherillc@...>
          >Reply-To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          >To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [bolger] Modify a Windsprint?
          >Date: Sun, 01 Apr 2007 17:14:27 -0000
          >
          >I am warming up to build a Windsprint this spring. I am considering
          >giving it about 2 extra inches of freeboard. Some of the pictures I
          >have seen look like the gunwale is perilously close to the water close
          >hauled. I would appreciate opinions of this idea and the possibility
          >of decking over the bow and stern.
          >
          >V/R
          >Chris
          >

          _________________________________________________________________
          Live Search Maps � find all the local information you need, right when you
          need it. http://maps.live.com/?icid=hmtag2&FORM=MGAC01
        • Matthew Lawson
          To give Windsprint more freeboard means major changes in the layout of the side panels on the sheets of plywood, turning an incredibly materials-efficient
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            To give Windsprint more freeboard means major changes in the layout of the
            side panels on the sheets of plywood, turning an incredibly
            materials-efficient design into a plywood hog (comparatively). If you are
            willing to do that, then you might think about other designs. Hiking out in
            a stiff breeze does a lot to retain freeboard, and if you have another body
            for ballast, you shouldn't have much problem. Putting the design in
            Hulls.exe with a 900 lb load, I think the model showed 8 inches of
            freeboard. That kind of load is almost inconceivable, given the space
            constraints in the boat.



            Decking bow and stern is not a bad idea, especially if you make sealable
            flotation chambers. If you are decking to have a deck, you could bring it
            along the length of the gunwales to give your keister a break when hiking.
            Also, if you did that, you would effectively gain another several inches of
            freeboard, because the gunwale would have to go well under before water
            pours over the deck. Of course, that's when you would want those big
            flotation chambers.



            --Matt Lawson

            Trenton, NJ



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Christopher Wetherill
            Matt, Here is my concern. Look at Patrick Crockkett s pictures here: http://home.nc.rr.com/pcrockett/boats.html The photo showing two adults and a child
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Matt,

              Here is my concern. Look at Patrick Crockkett's pictures here:
              http://home.nc.rr.com/pcrockett/boats.html The photo showing two
              adults and a child aboard running close hauled doesn't show a lot of
              reserve against heeling and "burying the rail". Coupled with the
              numerous descriptions of swamping of Windsprints, I was inspired to
              contemplate the behaviors that could result in me taking an unplanned
              swim.

              The precipitating event in the descriptions I have read is the boom
              going under water. This would drag the hull across the wind.
              Knockdown would be inevitable. My thinking is that if the draft and
              heel combine to put the gunwale under then the swim would be just as
              certain.

              My options are to build as drawn, build with extra freeboard, and
              build with deck and combing. Building with deck and combing would
              result in a cockpit with reduced width. Since I am almost 50, 6'
              220#, and have troublesome knees, This is not too appealing. I
              therefore limit the decking to the ends of the hull and consider the
              freeboard.

              Decking the ends would add at least one sheet. Increasing the width
              of the sides would add another. I am trying to decide if the time and
              materials difference is worthwhile.

              V/R
              Chris


              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Lawson" <mplawson@...> wrote:
              >
              > To give Windsprint more freeboard means major changes in the layout
              of the
              > side panels on the sheets of plywood, turning an incredibly
              > materials-efficient design into a plywood hog (comparatively).
            • Jon & Wanda(Tink)
              I would think it may raise the COG and cause more heeling. It may be better to add 4-6 in width at center of force spredding the bow a little as well as the
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                I would think it may raise the COG and cause more heeling. It may be
                better to add 4-6" in width at center of force spredding the bow a
                little as well as the stern then deck.

                Jon

                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Wetherill"
                <wetherillc@...> wrote:
                >
                > Matt,
                >
                > Here is my concern. Look at Patrick Crockkett's pictures here:
                > http://home.nc.rr.com/pcrockett/boats.html The photo showing two
                > adults and a child aboard running close hauled doesn't show a lot of
                > reserve against heeling and "burying the rail". Coupled with the
                > numerous descriptions of swamping of Windsprints, I was inspired to
                > contemplate the behaviors that could result in me taking an
                unplanned
                > swim.
                >
                > The precipitating event in the descriptions I have read is the boom
                > going under water. This would drag the hull across the wind.
                > Knockdown would be inevitable. My thinking is that if the draft and
                > heel combine to put the gunwale under then the swim would be just as
                > certain.
                >
                > My options are to build as drawn, build with extra freeboard, and
                > build with deck and combing. Building with deck and combing would
                > result in a cockpit with reduced width. Since I am almost 50, 6'
                > 220#, and have troublesome knees, This is not too appealing. I
                > therefore limit the decking to the ends of the hull and consider the
                > freeboard.
                >
                > Decking the ends would add at least one sheet. Increasing the width
                > of the sides would add another. I am trying to decide if the time
                and
                > materials difference is worthwhile.
                >
                > V/R
                > Chris
                >
                >
                > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Lawson" <mplawson@> wrote:
                > >
                > > To give Windsprint more freeboard means major changes in the
                layout
                > of the
                > > side panels on the sheets of plywood, turning an incredibly
                > > materials-efficient design into a plywood hog (comparatively).
              • Matthew Lawson
                Chris: I appreciate your concerns. Windsprint is really a very small boat. The pointy ends, though beautiful, make LOA deciptive, add no bouyancy, and
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 2, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Chris:

                  I appreciate your concerns. Windsprint is really a very small boat.
                  The pointy ends, though beautiful, make LOA deciptive, add no bouyancy,
                  and constrain interior space. Before I built I strongly considered a
                  stretched punt. After being out a few times, I wished I had done that
                  or scaled the design to 18'. Oh well. I'm pleased overall. And she
                  IS a beautiful boat.

                  I have not had a knockdown, but then I didn't go with the balance lug
                  as designed, which may make a difference. I've got sketches for my
                  sprit-boomed sprit sail in bolger2\files\windsprint stuff. The foot of
                  the sail is angled up, so I think I would sink the gunwale before I had
                  a knockdown on any point of sailing. Or maybe I'm chicken. Maybe this
                  summer, with warm water, all flotation, and my bailing bucket, I'll see
                  how far I can press it.

                  (Patrick: nice kayak! I've thought of building one next. Wait, Chris,
                  why don't you just leapfrog the Windsprint, build a CLC kayak, and get
                  the CLC outrigger and sea kayak sail kit. If you want to sprint on the
                  wind, I think that may be your best bet. Or a hobie cat. Or an ice
                  boat.)

                  --Matt

                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Wetherill" <wetherillc@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Matt,
                  >
                  > Here is my concern. Look at Patrick Crockkett's pictures here:
                  > http://home.nc.rr.com/pcrockett/boats.html The photo showing two
                  > adults and a child aboard running close hauled doesn't show a lot of
                  > reserve against heeling and "burying the rail". Coupled with the
                  > numerous descriptions of swamping of Windsprints, I was inspired to
                  > contemplate the behaviors that could result in me taking an unplanned
                  > swim.
                • Patrick Crockett
                  Chris: Lots of people make water-tight compartments fore and aft for flotation, and therefore deck over the bow and stern. I put a deck about 4 below the
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 2, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Chris:

                    Lots of people make water-tight compartments fore and aft for flotation,
                    and therefore deck over the bow and stern. I put a deck about 4" below
                    the gunwales forward (back to the mast step), making a place where I was
                    comfortable letting my daughter lounge from the time she was 4. Now that
                    she's 13, she kind of hangs over the edges when she lounges up there,
                    but it is still where she goes when she is not steering. I made an
                    after-deck from the rear thwart back, about 2" below the gunwales. I
                    throw stuff back there to get it out of the way -- water bottles,
                    cushions, stern painter, etc. I haven't yet bothered with the
                    water-tight compartment thing, I just stacked up some closed cell foam
                    and put plywood on top of that. Someday, I'll finish the boat.

                    Windsprint was specifically designed to fit into 4 sheets of plywood. If
                    you add freeboard, you'll have to buy another sheet. I don't think it
                    will be quite as pretty. OTOH, another 2 inches might have saved me from
                    a capsize last July 4th. Or not. I think that I have capsized more often
                    from dragging the boom in the water (close reaching) than from excessive
                    heel. Truly, the boat feels safest to me when close-hauled.

                    I have needed to strengthen the rudder stock, reinforce the daggerboard
                    trunk where it attaches to the side of the boat, and repair the mast
                    step when the mast chewed it up -- not sure if that was during a capsize
                    or when we broke the rudder and were flopping around in large waves with
                    a fair bit of wind (and a ferry waiting for us to get out of the way).

                    Some photos of my boat are in the photos section of the Bolger group:
                    http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/photos/browse/49d7?c=
                    and some others are at: http://www.patrickcrockett.com/boats/boats.html
                    One photo on the latter page looks like the gunwale is perilously close
                    to the water, but I'm pretty sure we didn't ship any water that trip. My
                    daughter was OK with tippy-ness at that age, but would have been pretty
                    worried about water coming in. Part of what makes it look perilous is
                    the fact that the bow wave lifts up almost to the gunwale -- note that
                    at the ends the water is not so tall.

                    BTW, when you buy (or build) a sail, be _sure_ to have the second reef
                    put in -- if you single-hand the boat in any breeze at all, you will be
                    glad to have it. And figure out a way to reef the sail while under way.
                    I also found that a 2-part sheet was very helpful (and an over-sized one
                    -- I have 1/2" soft yacht braid). I tie off to the rudder stock, run the
                    sheet to the end of the boom, along the boom, and back to my hand from a
                    block at mid-boom. Much more comfortable when the wind pipes up than the
                    designed 1-part sheet (end of the boom to the rudder to the hand).

                    Patrick


                    Christopher Wetherill wrote:
                    > I am warming up to build a Windsprint this spring. I am considering
                    > giving it about 2 extra inches of freeboard. Some of the pictures I
                    > have seen look like the gunwale is perilously close to the water close
                    > hauled. I would appreciate opinions of this idea and the possibility
                    > of decking over the bow and stern.
                    >
                    > V/R
                    > Chris
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Bolger rules!!!
                    > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
                    > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                    > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                    > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                    > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                    > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • graeme19121984
                    ... Chris, as you would then be into a six sheet boat have you thought of other instants of around that size, eg COLD-WATER SAILBOARD, or JINNI? Freeboard not
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 4, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Wetherill" <wetherillc@...>
                      wrote:
                      > Decking the ends would add at least one sheet. Increasing the width
                      > of the sides would add another. I am trying to decide if the time
                      >and materials difference is worthwhile.

                      Chris,

                      as you would then be into a six sheet boat have you thought of other
                      instants of around that size, eg COLD-WATER SAILBOARD, or JINNI?

                      Freeboard not greatly increased, but bottom beam is, so with transom
                      sterns these should stand up more to sail, and both have their own way
                      for easy recovery should capsise ever [guaranteed ;-)] happen. The
                      WINDSPRINT sail could be fitted to either with a little fiddling, if
                      wanted

                      Graeme
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.