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Re: Sailing the Bobcat

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  • Jamie Orr
    Hi Thierry, I must admit I hit the send button before I realized Rob was involved. I should pay more attention. I d say Bobcat is too small for you. Although
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 24, 2007
      Hi Thierry,

      I must admit I hit the send button before I realized Rob was
      involved. I should pay more attention.

      I'd say Bobcat is too small for you. Although the boat itself is a
      12 footer, the cockpit is definitely on the small side and wouldn't
      accommodate your family.

      I've forwarded your email to the owner of the boat I spoke of, he
      will be able to give you better information.

      BTW, I've seen Bill Garden's Tomcat up close, both on the water and
      in his shop, and it is a beautiful little boat. It sails very well
      too, as you'd expect. Much roomier than Bobcat, but five people is
      going to be a crowd in any 12 footer!

      Jamie

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Thierry" <thierry.msika@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie Orr" <jas_orr@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi,
      > >
      > > No, you're not wrong. We had three grown men in her, and we
      were
      > > sitting down on the floor boards -- we even had one corner left
      over
      > > for a fourth. We were comfortable but we weren't out there for
      a
      > > long time or in more than 10 knots of wind. However, I believe
      the
      > > other two guys day-sailed together quite regularly, and they
      didn't
      > > mention any problems. You could lower the coamings a bit and
      sit on
      > > the deck instead, like a conventional sailing dinghy.
      > >
      > > The owner is building a Chebacco now, which I think is the
      perfect
      > > solution, but then I'm hardly objective about that.
      > >
      > > In my opinion, if you want a sturdy, stable daysailer, with some
      > > character and reasonable performance, Bobcat is good choice.
      > > However if you want more than just adequate cockpit space, you
      > > should look around some more.
      > >
      > > I'm basing this on a single experience and my personal
      comparison to
      > > other boats I've sailed. You might want to get a second or
      third
      > > opinion.
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > >
      > > Jamie
      >
      > Jamie,
      >
      > I am not sure if this answer is directed to me or to Rob.
      >
      > Anyway, I usually sail alone but occasionally have my family with
      me
      > which can be up to 5 (lean) people.
      > I am looking for a daysailer to keep on a mooring from may to
      december.
      > I want the boat to be stable enough to be sailed by one person but
      big
      > enough to take more people and still fast enough.
      > I want a very good looking boat to grace the cove where I will have
      > the mooring and I thing the Bobcat is really good looking,
      certainly
      > nicer than the Beetle and almost as beautiful as the Tom Cat by
      > William Garden.
      > I want a short boat to pick up with my utility trailer at the end
      of
      > the season and to store easily.
      > I have made a couple of Teals and this is a great boat to row and
      keep
      > on a ramp but it's a bit scary as a daysailer, especially because
      it
      > has no side decks, no flotation and the standing lug rig I put on
      it
      > makes the boat unstable downwind (death roll). Though one Teal will
      > stay on the ramp to reach the New Boat at his mooring.
      >
      >
      > Cheers
      >
      > Thierry
      >
    • gilberj55
      ... Hello, As a family boat the bobcat may be a little small.I grew up sailing several different 14 foot gaff cat boat dinghys. All performed well. One in
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 24, 2007
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie Orr" <jas_orr@...> wrote:
        >
        Hello,
        As a family boat the bobcat may be a little small.I grew up sailing
        several different 14 foot gaff cat boat dinghys. All performed well.
        One in particular had a lot of buoyancy and did carry regularly 4-5
        adults or near-adults at a time, without being over burdened.

        I took care of a friends 15foot Wittholtz cat boat for a few weeks
        about 25 years ago and think that may be about as good as you can get
        for an easily sailed roomy small boat, capable of reasonable
        cruising. These boats are really pretty as well. I think plans are
        available from Woodenboat. They are I think a little more work to
        build, being what might be called traditional plywood construction
        rather than having full sized patterns and tack and tape, but I think
        these boats are great and definitely worth the effort.

        JG

        > Hi Thierry,
        >
        > I must admit I hit the send button before I realized Rob was
        > involved. I should pay more attention.
        >
        > I'd say Bobcat is too small for you. Although the boat itself is a
        > 12 footer, the cockpit is definitely on the small side and wouldn't
        > accommodate your family.
        >
        > I've forwarded your email to the owner of the boat I spoke of, he
        > will be able to give you better information.
        >
        > BTW, I've seen Bill Garden's Tomcat up close, both on the water and
        > in his shop, and it is a beautiful little boat. It sails very well
        > too, as you'd expect. Much roomier than Bobcat, but five people is
        > going to be a crowd in any 12 footer!
        >
        > Jamie
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Thierry" <thierry.msika@> wrote:
        > >
        > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie Orr" <jas_orr@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi,
        > > >
        > > > No, you're not wrong. We had three grown men in her, and we
        > were
        > > > sitting down on the floor boards -- we even had one corner left
        > over
        > > > for a fourth. We were comfortable but we weren't out there for
        > a
        > > > long time or in more than 10 knots of wind. However, I believe
        > the
        > > > other two guys day-sailed together quite regularly, and they
        > didn't
        > > > mention any problems. You could lower the coamings a bit and
        > sit on
        > > > the deck instead, like a conventional sailing dinghy.
        > > >
        > > > The owner is building a Chebacco now, which I think is the
        > perfect
        > > > solution, but then I'm hardly objective about that.
        > > >
        > > > In my opinion, if you want a sturdy, stable daysailer, with
        some
        > > > character and reasonable performance, Bobcat is good choice.
        > > > However if you want more than just adequate cockpit space, you
        > > > should look around some more.
        > > >
        > > > I'm basing this on a single experience and my personal
        > comparison to
        > > > other boats I've sailed. You might want to get a second or
        > third
        > > > opinion.
        > > >
        > > > Cheers,
        > > >
        > > > Jamie
        > >
        > > Jamie,
        > >
        > > I am not sure if this answer is directed to me or to Rob.
        > >
        > > Anyway, I usually sail alone but occasionally have my family with
        > me
        > > which can be up to 5 (lean) people.
        > > I am looking for a daysailer to keep on a mooring from may to
        > december.
        > > I want the boat to be stable enough to be sailed by one person
        but
        > big
        > > enough to take more people and still fast enough.
        > > I want a very good looking boat to grace the cove where I will
        have
        > > the mooring and I thing the Bobcat is really good looking,
        > certainly
        > > nicer than the Beetle and almost as beautiful as the Tom Cat by
        > > William Garden.
        > > I want a short boat to pick up with my utility trailer at the end
        > of
        > > the season and to store easily.
        > > I have made a couple of Teals and this is a great boat to row and
        > keep
        > > on a ramp but it's a bit scary as a daysailer, especially because
        > it
        > > has no side decks, no flotation and the standing lug rig I put on
        > it
        > > makes the boat unstable downwind (death roll). Though one Teal
        will
        > > stay on the ramp to reach the New Boat at his mooring.
        > >
        > >
        > > Cheers
        > >
        > > Thierry
        > >
        >
      • Thierry
        OK, I made my mind, if there is a Bobcat for sale I would be interested to know about it. Thanks all, Thierry
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 24, 2007
          OK,

          I made my mind,

          if there is a Bobcat for sale I would be interested to know about it.

          Thanks all,

          Thierry
        • txsailor37
          Hello... I finished a Bobcat and started sailing her last year. The boat sails very well, launches easily, and will hold 2 adults fairly comfortably and can
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 26, 2007
            Hello... I finished a Bobcat and started sailing her last year. The
            boat sails very well, launches easily, and will hold 2 adults fairly
            comfortably and can even have a kid along. The boat can take the
            weight of more people easily, you just run out of room to put them. I
            wrote a couple of articles for Duckworks Magazine, the second article
            was dedicated to the Bobcats sailing abilities. Here are the links to
            those articles.

            Part1: http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/06/projects/bobcat/index.htm
            Part2: http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/06/projects/bobcat2/index.htm

            If you have anymore questions feel free to Email me @
            txsailor37@...

            Bobby





            -- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Thierry" <thierry.msika@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello All,
            >
            > I am thinking of building the Bobcat this spring. I already found
            > quite a lot of information on the net about building the boat but
            not
            > enough about sailing a cat, especially the Cape Cod type cat.
            >
            > I'd like to hear about the sailing qualities and mostly the sailing
            > flaws of the boat, if any.
            >
            > Is there anything against the catboat going to windward, dipping its
            > long boom on a run, the rudder maybe being too short, etc...
            >
            > Has someone tried a different rig, e.g. junk rig or cat gaff yawl
            with
            > a little standing lug jigger sheeted on a boomkin to balance the
            boat
            > while reefed, etc...
            >
            > I am intending to sail the boat in the Bay of Lunenburg, Nova
            Scotia,
            > which is fairly protected but still part of the Atlantic Ocean.
            >
            > Thank you for your comments.
            >
            > Thierry
            >
          • Thierry
            Yes I have your articles bookmarked and I read them. Thank you for sharing. Do you find the boat safe enough with the little bit of flotation front and back? I
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 27, 2007
              Yes I have your articles bookmarked and I read them. Thank you for
              sharing.

              Do you find the boat safe enough with the little bit of flotation
              front and back?
              I am thinking of enclosing all the under deck areas, a bit like in the
              Fireball to keep a small cockpit and a lot of storage and buoyancy.
              Every compartment would have a hatch either in the side accessible
              from the cockpit or from the top in the deck for access and
              ventilation but I have to check if it would not add too much weight.
              A double bottom above the water line instead of floorboards is another
              consideration that would make the boat self draining at the mooring
              and on a run and add buoyancy. But this solution might reduce the
              cockpit depth too much.

              Thank you for your interest. I'll try to keep you posted when I start,
              probably not before May and in case I haven't found a used one in the
              mean time.

              Cheers

              Thierry
            • txsailor37
              I would think that an increase in flotation would be good. If I were to do it all over again, I would seriously consider making the rear area under the seat
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 28, 2007
                I would think that an increase in flotation would be good. If I were
                to do it all over again, I would seriously consider making the rear
                area under the "seat" a sealed compartment. That should give you
                plenty of positive bouyancy along with the foam up front. Better yet
                seal this compartment off as well seeing as to how it is totally
                inaccessible once the deck is put on. Having said all of that I have
                never worried about flotation for the boat. The boat is very stable,
                I sail in protected waters for the most part and always wear a life
                vest. In the event that the boat became swamped so bad that I could
                not bail it, and or sank I would just start swimming toward shore.

                Bobby


                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Thierry" <thierry.msika@...> wrote:
                >
                > Yes I have your articles bookmarked and I read them. Thank you for
                > sharing.
                >
                > Do you find the boat safe enough with the little bit of flotation
                > front and back?
                > I am thinking of enclosing all the under deck areas, a bit like in
                the
                > Fireball to keep a small cockpit and a lot of storage and buoyancy.
                > Every compartment would have a hatch either in the side accessible
                > from the cockpit or from the top in the deck for access and
                > ventilation but I have to check if it would not add too much
                weight.
                > A double bottom above the water line instead of floorboards is
                another
                > consideration that would make the boat self draining at the mooring
                > and on a run and add buoyancy. But this solution might reduce the
                > cockpit depth too much.
                >
                > Thank you for your interest. I'll try to keep you posted when I
                start,
                > probably not before May and in case I haven't found a used one in
                the
                > mean time.
                >
                > Cheers
                >
                > Thierry
                >
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