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Re: [bolger] Re: Light Dory Type V

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  • Bruce Hallman
    ... Certainly all true, (and this is now splitting hairs), but I think I notice that during Phil Bolger s career that he has tended towards giving increased
    Message 1 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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      > Amen. Mine's the prettiest boat at the lake whenever she's there. A
      > joy to row, and even better with two of us.

      Certainly all true, (and this is now splitting hairs), but I think I
      notice that during Phil Bolger's career that he has tended towards
      giving increased buoyancy in the bow and stern of rowboats. I think
      his hypothesis is that there is trade off of 'fine entry lines' versus
      a gain from 'effective waterline length' which is slightly more
      desireable in rowboats. I bet that the 'perfect' rowboat in PCB's
      mind might have more fullness in the ends than a Light Dory V.

      Though, I cannot argue that those long sweeping lines are gorgeous,
      and might be spoiled if made more full in the ends.
    • Wesley Cox
      Good idea. I actually have a boat trailer with no boat on it that I could modify, and would have to modify for any curvy hull I would build next. I had
      Message 2 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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        Good idea. I actually have a boat trailer with no boat on it that I could modify, and would have to modify for any curvy hull I would build next. I had considered detaching the trailer from the hitch and pulling it with boat across the beach but the necessary tongue weight for driving would require a tongue extension to make it reasonable for hand carting, resulting in a big long heavy thing to maneuver across the sand. Thanks for the idea.


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: adventures_in_astrophotography
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 8:14 AM
        Subject: [bolger] Re: Light Dory Type V


        Hi Wesley,

        ...snip...
        Personally, I'm leaning toward a cart with 2 wheel barrow size
        pneumatic wheels (to not sink in the sand, hopefully) which attaches
        to the gunnels while the boat is still on the rack and a process I
        envision that would never require lifting more than half the weight
        of the boat.
        ...snip...

        I built a hand cart that looks like a small wooden trailer for my
        Long Light Dory. It's a bit heavy, since it has a 4x4 backbone, but
        it beats trailer launching for this sort of "in between" size boat.
        I carry the boat and cart to the lake on 2x6 crosswise bunks bolted
        to the deck of a 16' utility trailer, then roll the boat off using
        cheap ramps and right into the water. This also allows me to launch
        off the small beach area away from the impatient crowd in their huge
        plastic noisemakers. If you have other use for a utility trailer
        (and who doesn't) and a place to park it, I recommend looking into
        this approach. Besides, you can carry different boats you might
        build later with the same trailer.

        Jon Kolb
        www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • dave seeton
        For what its worth I built a 16 wooden trailer with two fixed wheel barrow tires to transport 16 wooden boat to launch site. In SC you don t have to lic. a
        Message 3 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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          For what its worth I built a 16' wooden trailer with two fixed wheel barrow tires to transport 16' wooden boat to launch site. In SC you don't have to lic. a trailer. And of course the launch site is only 2 1/2 miles from the house.
          Dave

          adventures_in_astrophotography <jon@...> wrote:
          Hi Wesley,

          ...snip...
          Personally, I'm leaning toward a cart with 2 wheel barrow size
          pneumatic wheels (to not sink in the sand, hopefully) which attaches
          to the gunnels while the boat is still on the rack and a process I
          envision that would never require lifting more than half the weight
          of the boat.
          ...snip...

          I built a hand cart that looks like a small wooden trailer for my
          Long Light Dory. It's a bit heavy, since it has a 4x4 backbone, but
          it beats trailer launching for this sort of "in between" size boat.
          I carry the boat and cart to the lake on 2x6 crosswise bunks bolted
          to the deck of a 16' utility trailer, then roll the boat off using
          cheap ramps and right into the water. This also allows me to launch
          off the small beach area away from the impatient crowd in their huge
          plastic noisemakers. If you have other use for a utility trailer
          (and who doesn't) and a place to park it, I recommend looking into
          this approach. Besides, you can carry different boats you might
          build later with the same trailer.

          Jon Kolb
          www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm






          ---------------------------------
          Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John and Kathy Trussell
          I used to think that the variations of the Light Dory were the prettiest boats that could be made from 4 sheets of plywood. At the risk of blasphemy, I think
          Message 4 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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            I used to think that the variations of the Light Dory were the prettiest boats that could be made from 4 sheets of plywood. At the risk of blasphemy, I think Ian Outred's Elf is at least its equal and may actually be prettier....

            JohnT
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Bruce Hallman
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 2:46 PM
            Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Light Dory Type V


            > Amen. Mine's the prettiest boat at the lake whenever she's there. A
            > joy to row, and even better with two of us.

            Certainly all true, (and this is now splitting hairs), but I think I
            notice that during Phil Bolger's career that he has tended towards
            giving increased buoyancy in the bow and stern of rowboats. I think
            his hypothesis is that there is trade off of 'fine entry lines' versus
            a gain from 'effective waterline length' which is slightly more
            desireable in rowboats. I bet that the 'perfect' rowboat in PCB's
            mind might have more fullness in the ends than a Light Dory V.

            Though, I cannot argue that those long sweeping lines are gorgeous,
            and might be spoiled if made more full in the ends.





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